Endpoint Security

IBM Adds New Features to MaaS360 with Watson UEM Product

IBM announced on Monday that it has added two new important features to its "MaaS360 with Watson" unified endpoint management (UEM) solution. UEM solutions allow enterprise IT teams to manage smartphones, tablets, laptops and IoT devices in their organization from a single management console. IBM has improved its MaaS360 with Watson UEM product with two capabilities the company says can be highly useful for IT departments: app intelligence and reporting, and security policy recommendations.

Business Dashboards for Apps is designed to provide administrators information on mobile applications and how they are used by employees. This can help them get a better understanding of which apps require attention and investment and which ones can be removed. IT teams can obtain information on the number of installs (by platform, manufacturer and ownership), usage (popularity and session length), performance (crashes and data usage), and trend information (crashes, network requests and data consumption over a period of six months).

Admins can also apply filters to make analysis easier and more useful. The second new feature, the Policy Recommendation Engine, helps IT teams by dynamically providing recommendations when configuring security policies. Recommendations are provided based on the organization's profile and common practices observed at similar companies in the MaaS360 community.

"Imagine a way to configure your policies with guidance that is dynamically presented every step of the way, catered to your organization and the size of your deployment. Whether you're new to the game -- or have been managing policies for years -- a little confidence in your configurations goes a long way," IBM Security's John Harrington Jr. said in a blog post. IBM also announced this week the launch of Guardium Analyzer, a new tool that uses a specialized data classification engine and data patterns to identify and classify GDPR-relevant information across cloud and on-premise systems.

The tool can also identify the databases most likely to fail a GDPR-focused audit, the company said. Related: IBM Helps Banks Prevent New Account Fraud Related: IBM Adds New Service to Cloud Identity Offering

Related: IBM Adds Intelligence to Incident Response, Threat Management

IBM Adds New Features to MaaS360 with Watson UEM Product

IBM announced on Monday that it has added two new important features to its “MaaS360 with Watson” unified endpoint management (UEM) solution. UEM solutions allow enterprise IT teams to manage smartphones, tablets, laptops and IoT devices in their organization from a single management console. IBM has improved its MaaS360 with Watson UEM product with two capabilities the company says can be highly useful for IT departments: app intelligence and reporting, and security policy recommendations.

Business Dashboards for Apps is designed to provide administrators information on mobile applications and how they are used by employees. This can help them get a better understanding of which apps require attention and investment and which ones can be removed. IT teams can obtain information on the number of installs (by platform, manufacturer and ownership), usage (popularity and session length), performance (crashes and data usage), and trend information (crashes, network requests and data consumption over a period of six months).

Admins can also apply filters to make analysis easier and more useful. The second new feature, the Policy Recommendation Engine, helps IT teams by dynamically providing recommendations when configuring security policies. Recommendations are provided based on the organization’s profile and common practices observed at similar companies in the MaaS360 community.

“Imagine a way to configure your policies with guidance that is dynamically presented every step of the way, catered to your organization and the size of your deployment. Whether you’re new to the game — or have been managing policies for years — a little confidence in your configurations goes a long way,” IBM Security’s John Harrington Jr. said in a blog post. IBM also announced this week the launch of Guardium Analyzer, a new tool that uses a specialized data classification engine and data patterns to identify and classify GDPR-relevant information across cloud and on-premise systems.

The tool can also identify the databases most likely to fail a GDPR-focused audit, the company said. Related: IBM Helps Banks Prevent New Account Fraud Related: IBM Adds New Service to Cloud Identity Offering

Related: IBM Adds Intelligence to Incident Response, Threat Management

Apple Boosts Security in iOS 12, macOS Mojave

At its Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) 2018 this week, Apple shared information on the security improvements that iOS 12 and macOS Mojave are set to bring when they arrive this fall.

While previewing the next platform iterations at the event, Apple revealed features that will change the overall user experience on both mobile and desktop devices, but also presented enhancements that should improve the overall privacy and security of its users.

One of the main changes impacts the Safari browser on both iOS and macOS, which will soon deliver improved Intelligent Tracking Prevention capabilities, preventing social media buttons (such as "Like" and "Share") from tracking users without permission.

"Safari now also presents simplified system information when users browse the web, preventing them from being tracked based on their system configuration," the iPhone maker says.

Other features the company previewed for the upcoming platform iterations include end-to-end encryption for Facetime group calls and password managers integrated into macOS and iOS, to help users employ stronger passwords, store them securely, and automatically enter them when needed.

"Safari now also automatically creates, autofills and stores strong passwords when users create new online accounts and flags reused passwords so users can change them," Apple said.

On macOS Mojave, new data protections will require applications to ask for user permission before using the camera and microphone or before accessing personal data such as mail history and messages database, the tech giant also says. This should prevent malicious software from spying on users.

To further strengthen user privacy, Apple also appears set to roll out a USB Restricted Mode in iOS 12, a feature that was initially noticed in iOS 11.3 beta, but later removed, only to be introduced in iOS 11.4 beta again.

With this new feature, an iPhone connected via USB to a computer (or to an USB accessory) will ask for the passcode every week, or it will lock down the Lightning port in charge only mode, thus preventing access to the data.

"To improve security, for a locked iOS device to communicate with USB accessories you must connect an accessory via lightning connector to the device while unlocked--or enter your device passcode while connected--at least once a week," Apple described the feature in iOS 11.3 beta.

As ElcomSoft's Oleg Afonin pointed out last month, this means that law enforcement agencies attempting to retrieve data from a suspect's iPhone will only have a small window of opportunity before the device locks down. The same applies to thieves and anyone else targeting that data.

The new feature appears as a reaction to a clash with the FBI a couple of years ago over the unlocking of the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone.

The legal battle eventually sparked a debate between supporters of backdoors in user products to facilitate criminal and national security investigations, and those who want data to be properly protected.

Later this month, as part of iOS 12 public beta, users will also take advantage of increased control over notifications, and will get detailed information on the time spent on the phone, courtesy of a new Screen Time feature.

There's also an App Limits feature to limit the time spent in an app, which gives parents more control over their children's use of a mobile device.

Related: Apple Touts Privacy Features of New Operating Systems

Related: Apple Patches Dozens of Flaws in macOS, iOS, Safari