Nightclub Security

Reference Library – Nightclub Security

Stormy Daniels' Entourage Accused of Abhorrent Behavior at Iconic Gay Nightclub

David Cooley, owner of West Hollywood's The Abbey, says that at the end of Stormy Daniels Day the porn star's security detail allegedly walked out on their tab, confiscated cell phones and shoved media. Stormy Daniels' security detail blew through The Abbey Food & Bar and whipped up quite a "disaster" of a tornado, this according to West Hollywood's most famous nightlife mogul. Abbey owner David Cooley posted on his personal Facebook account on Thursday night, claiming that Daniels' bodyguards were rude to patrons, shoved media and walked out on their bill without even tipping Abbey servers. (His comments were also shared on the Abbey's official Facebook account, seen below.) Daniels' appearance at the Robertson Boulevard's infamous LGBTQ watering hole capped off a big day for the porn star in the 90069.

At 4 p.m., Daniels appeared at adult retail store Chi Chi LaRue's alongside her attorney Michael Avenatti, West Hollywood Mayor John J. Duran and WeHo City Council members during an official proclamation ceremony designating May 23 as Stormy Daniels Day. She also received a key to the city.

Three hours later, Daniels returned to Chi Chi LaRue's to sign autographs before heading to The Abbey where she was to make another appearance which was originally supposed to last 30 minutes. According to a nightclub rep, Daniels stayed two hours during which she danced with drag queens, gogo dancers and "even made out with a random girl." But the night didn't end well, per Cooley. He posted a thank you to everyone who came out to his bar to see her, and then he unloaded on the unprofessionalism of her detail.

The Abbey CEO and founder posted, "Stormy was a delightful guest and we would have her back any time. Her security detail was a disaster. They were rude to many of our guests, they were aggressive with several of our staff, they were shoving press outside and being generally rude," he wrote. "They also walked out on their bill and didn't tip their server.

This is not the behavior that we tolerate at [The Abbey]." Cooley also claims that Daniels' security confiscated cell phones from patrons. "We've heard from many of you that they were taking your cell phones away. If your cell phone was taken by her security detail, please file a report with the West Hollywood Sheriffs immediately."

The Hollywood Reporter has reached out to West Hollywood police and a rep for Daniels for comment.

Robert Nikolovski acquitted over Fever nightclub brawl with Finks bikie Troy Fornaciari

Robert Nikolovski acquitted over Fever nightclub brawl with Finks bikie

  • Top, left: Jurors found Robert Nikolovski not guilty of affray. Bottom, left:Troy Fornaciari. .Right: CCTV stills show Nikolovski, in the ripped shirt, punching Troy Fornaciari.

    Top, left: Jurors found Robert Nikolovski not guilty of affray.

    Bottom, left:Troy Fornaciari. .Right: CCTV stills show Nikolovski, in the ripped shirt, punching Troy Fornaciari.

  • The accused: Jurors found Robert Nikolovski not guilty of affray after a two-day hearing.

    The accused: Jurors found Robert Nikolovski not guilty of affray after a two-day hearing.

  • The 'victim': Troy Fornaciari as he looks today. He had barely any facial tattoos in 2014, as depicted on the CCTV footage.

    The 'victim': Troy Fornaciari as he looks today.

    He had barely any facial tattoos in 2014, as depicted on the CCTV footage.

  • The scene: CCTV stills show Nikolovski, in the ripped shirt, punching Troy Fornaciari.

    The scene: CCTV stills show Nikolovski, in the ripped shirt, punching Troy Fornaciari.

  • The scene: CCTV stills show Nikolovski, in the ripped shirt, punching Troy Fornaciari.

    The scene: CCTV stills show Nikolovski, in the ripped shirt, punching Troy Fornaciari.

  • The scene: CCTV stills show Nikolovski, in the ripped shirt, punching Troy Fornaciari.

    The scene: CCTV stills show Nikolovski, in the ripped shirt, punching Troy Fornaciari.

  • Troy Fornaciari swore under oath this wasn't him on the right. Ian Palamara also swore under oath it wasn't him on the left, talking on the phone.

    Troy Fornaciari swore under oath this wasn't him on the right.

    Ian Palamara also swore under oath it wasn't him on the left, talking on the phone.

  • Troy Fornaciari swore under oath this wasn't him on the right. Ian Palamara also swore under oath it wasn't him on the left, talking on the phone.

    Troy Fornaciari swore under oath this wasn't him on the right.

    Ian Palamara also swore under oath it wasn't him on the left, talking on the phone.

Illawarra man Robert 'Boxer' Nikolovski has been acquitted of an affray charge over a violent brawl outside Fever nightclub involving ex-Rebel-turned-Finks bikie president Troy Fornaciari.
A NSW District Court jury sat through two days worth of evidence from witnesses including club security guards working on the night, however took a matter of minutes to find Nikolovski not guilty of the charge on Wednesday afternoon after his lawyers argued he had been acting in self defence. The court heard Nikolovski and Fornaciari were both at the nightclub with separate parties in the early hours of September 13, 2014 when Fornaciari allegedly violently assaulted one of Nikolovski's friends inside the toilet block after making a pass at the man's girlfriend.

One of the security guards told the court he arrived at the toilets to find Nikolovski holding an aggressive Fornaciari back and trying to calm him down.

CCTV footage shows Robert Nikolovski (black, ripped shirt) punching Troy Fornaciari

At the request of bouncers, Nikolovski then walked Fornaciari down a set of stairs and out into the rear carpark while telling him it was time to leave.
"Rob was saying 'come on Troy, let's just go, you've had a good night'," one of Nikolovski's friends told the court. "Troy was telling Rob to come around the corner so he could fight him."

The man said Fornaciari then grabbed Nikolovski's shirt, which had belonged to his late brother Goran, and ripped it slightly.
"Rob said 'can you please not rip my shirt because it's my brothers', but Troy grabbed it him in the same position and ripped it again," the man said.
CCTV footage shows Nikolovski punch Fornaciari three times, leaving him dazed on the footpath for about five minutes before he got up and walked around the corner to a waiting car, apparently uninjured.

An opposite angle showing Rob Nikolovski punching Troy Fornaciari

Meantime, Fornaciari refused to answer most questions asked of him during his brief but explosive testimony on Tuesday.

He refused to confirm he was involved in the fight or even at Fever that night, despite multiple people putting him at the scene and CCTV footage recording his actions inside and outside the club.

The 5 San Francisco police shootings that put the city in the spotlight

A series of fatal police shootings in San Francisco over the past several years have raised enduring concerns about how officers are trained and held accountable. The shootings prompted the U.S. Department of Justice to study the city police force and recommend a slate of reforms, an effort that continues.

The incidents spurred policy changes that emphasize de-escalating perilous encounters and preserving life. And they forced the resignation of a police chief. But none of the shootings led San Francisco District Attorney George Gascon to file criminal charges against officers.

On Thursday, he said there was insufficient evidence for charges against officers who killed Mario Woods in the Bayview neighborhood in December 2015 and Luis Gongora Pat in the Mission District in April 2016. The following are five notable cases:

Alex Nieto

Alejandro "Alex" Nieto was fatally shot March 21, 2014 in San Francisco's Bernal Heights Park after police said he pointed a Taser at officers, who mistook the shock device for a pistol. The four officers -- who fired at least 48 bullets, striking Nieto 10 to 15 times -- responded to the park after receiving reports from fearful witnesses of a man, armed with a gun, acting erratically.

The officers, Lt. Jason Sawyer and Officers Roger Morse, Richard Schiff and Nathan Chew, were cleared by the district attorney's office, which found the officers reasonably confused the weapons. Supporters and friends of Nieto, a 28-year-old Mission District resident and City College student, disputed that he could have pulled and pointed a Taser at officers.

They said Nieto had the stun gun because he was working as a nightclub security guard. The shooting sparked widespread protests, and Nieto's parents sued the city, but a federal jury cleared the officers in March 2016.

The 5 San Francisco police shootings that put the city in the spotlight

Amilcar Perez-Lopez On Feb.

26, 2015, two plainclothes officers responded to reports of a man chasing another man with a knife on Folsom Street in the Mission. The question that emerged was whether Perez-Lopez was shot while threatening the other man and the officers, or while trying to run away. When Officer Craig Tiffe grabbed Perez-Lopez -- a 21-year-old recent immigrant from Guatemala -- and tried to pin him to the ground, he was "violently resisting," Tiffe's partner, Eric Reboli, told investigators.

Prosecutors said Reboli "saw a flash of a very large silver knife" and thought his partner had been stabbed. Reboli said he shot Perez-Lopez five times to protect himself and his partner, while Tiffe said he shot him once to protect the other man in the altercation. Pressure to charge the officers mounted from community advocates, who held weekly vigils outside Mission Police Station.

The advocates said officers needlessly fired at Perez-Lopez, who was intoxicated, after the city medical examiner determined that all six bullets struck him from the back and side. The young man's supporters said he spoke Spanish and must not have realized the men were cops. Both officers, who said they had announced themselves as cops, were cleared of charges two years after the shooting.

Perez-Lopez's parents filed a federal lawsuit against the city. The case settled for an undisclosed amount.

The 5 San Francisco police shootings that put the city in the spotlight

Mario Woods On Dec.

2, 2015, police responded at 4:20 p.m. to reports of a stabbing in the Bayview. Officers encountered Woods, 26, who was still holding the knife, and they quickly surrounded him. What unfolded next was captured on video by witnesses and posted to social media, prompting outrage and protests.

Nearly a dozen officers formed a semi-circle around Woods, who had his back to a wall, and after giving him orders to drop the weapon they attempted to subdue him with pepper spray and by shooting him with projectile rounds, according to the city district attorney's office. Woods slumped down, investigators said, but was able to shuffle to his right along the wall while still holding the knife. Officer Charles August cut in front of him and opened fire when Woods, knife at his side, continued to advance to within about 10 feet of the officer despite orders to stop.

In total, five officers fired 26 rounds and struck Woods 20 times in a flurry. August told investigators he had warned Woods to drop the knife, and that Woods responded, "You're gonna have to do it." and began walking faster toward him. August said he needed to protect bystanders at a bus stop behind him.

Two days after the incident, after the cell-phone videos emerged, Suhr addressed an emotional town hall meeting, presenting an enlarged frame from the video that he said showed Woods pointing his blade at August before the officers opened fire. The district attorney's investigation contradicted that claim. Nevertheless, it found the officers were within their rights to shoot Woods.

Police watchdogs and Woods' relatives and supporters have long asserted that the officers used faulty tactics, and excessive force, against a man who posed no threat when he was shot. Former Mayor Ed Lee asked the U.S. Department of Justice to review the Police Department following the shooting.

The 5 San Francisco police shootings that put the city in the spotlight

Luis Gongora

On April 7, 2016, officers responded to reports of a man with a large kitchen knife acting erratically on SHotwell Street in San Francisco's Mission District. Despite a new police policy focused on de-escalating tense encounters, three officers took just 30 seconds to exit their vehicles and approach Gongora Pat, 45. Gongora Pat initially dropped the knife but picked it back up, said a report by the district attorney's office.

The officers commanded him again to drop the weapon in English and Spanish before Officer Michael Mellone shot him with bean bag rounds, officials said. That's when Gongora Pat jumped up, knife in hand, and charged at Sgt. Nathaniel Steger, according to the district attorney's report.

Steger and Mellone opened fire, hitting Gongora Pat six times, including a fatal shot to the head, the report said. Gongora Pat was pronounced dead at the scene. The medical examiner's report found he was under the influence of methamphetamine at a level "high enough to kill or hospitalize a non-habitual user."

Surveillance video from a camera near the scene didn't show the moment when Gongora Pat was shot. However, the video raised questions about the officers' tactics following the new de-escalation policies that emphasized creating time and distance. The killing re-ignited protests around San Francisco and prompted five people to go on a hunger strike while calling for Police Chief Greg Suhr to resign.

The 5 San Francisco police shootings that put the city in the spotlight

Jessica Williams

Amid ongoing controversy over the city's police shootings, the killing of Williams on May 19, 2016 was a breaking point, prompting the resignation of then-Chief Greg Suhr. Williams, a 29-year-old homeless woman, was sitting in a stolen Honda Accord on a dead-end street in the Bayview neighborhood when two officers tapped on the window of her car. Startled, she drove away and rammed into a parked utility car, according to the district attorney's office.

Sgt. Justin Erb ran to the driver's side of the vehicle to arrest Williams, who allegedly put the car into reverse and attempted to speed off again. Prosecutors concluded that Williams, who was unarmed, was driving in Erb's direction when he fired a single shot into her chest.

Suhr resigned within hours as the shooting renewed questions about whether the department had lost the confidence of minority communities after other shootings, as well as revelations that a number of officers had exchanged bigoted text messages. The sergeant who shot Williams was cleared in October 2017 by Gascon's office, which cited "insufficient evidence." San Francisco Public Defender Jeff Adachi expressed outrage. "I'm flabbergasted that the DA is saying it is OK to shoot at a person who appears to have been fleeing in a car," he said. "How can you justify shooting a person when you easily could have stepped out of the way?"

The city Police Commission amended the department's use-of-force policy in December 2016, barring officers in most cases from firing on moving vehicles.

Sarah Ravani and Evan Sernoffsky are San Francisco Chronicle staff writers.

Email: [email protected], [email protected] Twitter: @SarRavani, @EvanSernoffsky