protection

Civil Protection Department acquires six new specialised vehicles

The department now operates 12 vehicles in total, five of which were purchased earlier this year at a cost of EUR2,650,000.

Civil Protection Department acquires six new specialised vehiclesThe Civil Protection Department has today showcased six new vehicles it has acquired, which are equipped with the latest technology, including breathing apparatus and hydraulic rescue equipment. The department now operates a total of 12 vehicles , five of which were purchased in September at a cost of EUR2,650,000.

Two of the new vehicles will be replacing two older Eurofire fire engines, each being able to carry 2,500 litres of water and to pump 2,000 litres a minute, while another of the vehicles, known as Eurocity, can carry 2,000 litres of water and pump 1,600 litres per minute. The remaining three vehicles consist in two Hi-Volume Water Carriers, which can carry 12,000 litres of water and pump 10,000 litres a minute, and an Incident Support Unit, meant for major incidents, which can be loaded with large equipment which cannot be transported by smaller vehicles, and can hold within it spare air cylinders, water pumps, a generator, and flood lights for night-time operations.

National security minister Michael Farrugia , attending an event in Valletta displaying the new vehicles, thanked Civil Protection personnel for their work, as he explained that an activity by he department in aid of the Malta Community Chest Fund is taking place throughout the day. “We will this year have changed eleven civil protection vehicles,” Farrugia said, “And we will be acquiring drones which will be used to help the department’s officials in deciding how best to act in cases of major accidents.” Farrugia also made reference to the department’s canine unit, K-9, thanking those who trained the dogs.

He also announced that two new vehicles, which were being built in Turkey and had could carry 10,000 litres of water, 1,500 litres of foam and 250kg of dry power, while having an output of 3, 500 litres of water, were close to completion.

The vehicles will also be capable of dealing with industrial fires.

The department and the Civil Protection Union, together with a number of NGOs, have also organised an activity, including shows by the K-9 unit, a simulation of a traffic accident and a demonstration on the use of fire extinguishers, in aid of the Malta Community Chest Fund.

Civil Protection Department acquires six new specialised vehicles

The department now operates 12 vehicles in total, five of which were purchased earlier this year at a cost of EUR2,650,000.

Civil Protection Department acquires six new specialised vehiclesThe Civil Protection Department has today showcased six new vehicles it has acquired, which are equipped with the latest technology, including breathing apparatus and hydraulic rescue equipment. The department now operates a total of 12 vehicles , five of which were purchased in September at a cost of EUR2,650,000.

Two of the new vehicles will be replacing two older Eurofire fire engines, each being able to carry 2,500 litres of water and to pump 2,000 litres a minute, while another of the vehicles, known as Eurocity, can carry 2,000 litres of water and pump 1,600 litres per minute. The remaining three vehicles consist in two Hi-Volume Water Carriers, which can carry 12,000 litres of water and pump 10,000 litres a minute, and an Incident Support Unit, meant for major incidents, which can be loaded with large equipment which cannot be transported by smaller vehicles, and can hold within it spare air cylinders, water pumps, a generator, and flood lights for night-time operations.

National security minister Michael Farrugia , attending an event in Valletta displaying the new vehicles, thanked Civil Protection personnel for their work, as he explained that an activity by he department in aid of the Malta Community Chest Fund is taking place throughout the day. “We will this year have changed eleven civil protection vehicles,” Farrugia said, “And we will be acquiring drones which will be used to help the department’s officials in deciding how best to act in cases of major accidents.” Farrugia also made reference to the department’s canine unit, K-9, thanking those who trained the dogs.

He also announced that two new vehicles, which were being built in Turkey and had could carry 10,000 litres of water, 1,500 litres of foam and 250kg of dry power, while having an output of 3, 500 litres of water, were close to completion.

The vehicles will also be capable of dealing with industrial fires.

The department and the Civil Protection Union, together with a number of NGOs, have also organised an activity, including shows by the K-9 unit, a simulation of a traffic accident and a demonstration on the use of fire extinguishers, in aid of the Malta Community Chest Fund.

IndyCar plans shield cockpit protection test at Phoenix in February

IndyCar is aiming to trial its shield cockpit protection system at February’s open test at Phoenix. The series had initially planned to run a version before the end of 2017[1] but has revised its timeframe in order to test a more developed prototype in ’18. The plan is for a single Dallara IR12 to be fitted with the new system at Phoenix, with the current monocoque able to accommodate the shield without extensive modifications.

IndyCar’s president of competition and operations Jay Frye said IndyCar had tested the ‘windshield’ device behind the scenes in recent months. “We have an open test at Phoenix in the first part of February in 2018 and our goal is to have some sort of application that we feel really good about and is very far along on a car at Phoenix,” he said. “There’s been a lot of simulation, windtunnel work, modelling, a lot of everything, but we’re yet to actually get it on a car.

“We’ve had it on a car statically but we haven’t tested it on a car at speed or at a racetrack so we’re working diligently to get it on one car to run at the open test. “It will be good, people will be able to see the aesthetics of it, people will be able to see the performance of it, what gains there is or what it actually does to the performance of the car.” IndyCar plans shield cockpit protection test at Phoenix in February

Frye added that a close relationship with Dallara meant it could plan for a future application with the new-for-2018 universal aerokit. “One of the things [that helps] is moving the air intake from the top to the bottom, that doesn’t affect [the car] anymore so that helps,” he said. “We’re excited about where we’re at and we look forward to getting a car at the track.”

Andrea Toso, Head of R&D and US Racing business leader for Dallara, said IndyCar had taken inspiration from the F-16 fighter jet in its cockpit protection system design. “I would say that we’ve been able to accommodate for everybody and everything,” said Toso. “First, the car has no halo.

I think soon IndyCar will test some sort of structural windscreen, which comes from military aeroplanes like on an F-16 jet fighter cockpit.

“I think IndyCar will do some destructive testing, and they will modify one of the existing monocoques with a structural frame to keep the screen in place.”

References

  1. ^ end of 2017 (www.autosport.com)