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Watch: Fire, security and fire escape doors are you putting lives at risk?

ABLOY UK Six out of 10 people don t know how to identify a fire door, according to research by Fire Door Safety Week. To mark the event, which took place in September, Abloy UK created a video explaining why complying with fire door regulations is so important and not just for legal reasons. You can watch the video which also touches on fire escape doors and security doors, below.

Abloy UK manufactures electric and mechanical security locking solutions.

embedded content Related Topics Majority of renters left in dark on basic fire safety measures Residential landlords still haven t learned Grenfell lessons especially in social housing, survey reveals A rogue s gallery of fire doors unworthy of the name (and perfectly good ones rendered useless)

Global anti-drone market to be worth $1,205 million by 2025

A study, published by Transparency Market Research (TMR), predicts the anti-drone market worldwide to be worth $1,205 million by 2025. Players, big and small, joining the global anti-drone market suggests a dynamic and competitive industry in the coming years, according to the report. The emergence of start-ups with innovative technologies and approaches is expected to disrupt the market and intensify competition among manufacturers of anti-drones in the future.

A report by TMR evaluated the global anti-drone market to be worth $214.7 million in 2016. The market is expected to grow with a 19.9% compound annual growth rate between 2017 and 2025. Government and military dominate the end-user segments with the military predicted to grow rapidly among all end-use segments, followed by the government. In terms of anti-drone technologies, neutralizing systems held the leading share in the market in 2016. North America is expected to display the leading growth over the forecast period. Firms operating in the global anti-drone market include Blighter Surveillance Systems, Dedrone Detect, Droneshield, Boeing, Lockheed Martin Corporation, SAAB and Theiss UAV Solutions. Free Download: The security drones report 2017 The global security drones market will be worth $10.5bn ( 8bn) by 2020 . This report commissioned by Aviat Drones examines the prevalence, growth prospects , applications and regulatory challenges of drones and anti-drone tech in the global security market. Find out how you can benefit from this lucrative market .

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Verint wins Frost & Sullivan accolade

Verint wins award and is named physical security intelligence solutions company of the year by Frost & Sullivan. The New York company Verint wins the award which recognises leadership, technology innovation and commitment to customer success. For the award Frost & Sullivan evaluated important factors, including visionary innovation and performance, and customer impact, which includes visionary strategies, financial performance and customer experience.

Danielle VanZandt, industry analyst at Frost & Sullivan said: As organisations continue to demand converged business intelligence, IT and security platforms, Verint serves as a trusted partner to its customers by helping connect their physical and cyber security operations. Through the firm s independent research, Verint s technology was found to be pivotal in helping customers leverage large data volumes in a more effective manner to help them respond faster and more efficiently to situations. Physical security intelligence platforms and services from Verint uses an open architecture that integrates diverse cyber and physical security sub-systems and applies intelligent analytics across many domains. The Verint Situational Awareness Platform aims to modernise security functions within an enterprise by automating critical duties and gathering and applying valuable intelligence to enhance efficiency. embedded content Free Download: Securing the UK s borders. Getting national security and Brexit right first time is crucial , we do not want to get this wrong. This report considers the implications of leaving the EU for the management of the UK s borders and making it as easy as possible for international business to thrive and legitimate movement to occur in a post-Brexit UK.

Click here to download now Related Topics The Top 5 Trends in Global Security According to Frost & Sullivan Siemens Building Technologies Scoops Frost & Sullivan Award Research: Security as a Key Enabler of Smart Cities

Majority of renters left in dark on basic fire safety measures

New research has shown three months after the Grenfell Tower disaster that the majority of tenants still feel left in the dark when it comes to fire safety. The study of more than 1,000 tenants in August 2017, commissioned by the British Woodworking Federation and released to mark Fire Door Safety Week, showed 55% of tenants do not feel fully prepared on what to do in the event of a fire. It also showed some 40% of renters said there was not a clear fire escape route displayed in their building.

More than a third of tenants (39%) said they had seen fire doors propped open as well. Renters also complained about damage to their building s fire doors 21% and just under a fifth (18%) said they reported a safety infringement or concern to their landlord but a quarter waited weeks for a response. Landlords Research also revealed that 10% of social landlords and 23% of private landlords had been in contact with tenants since the Grenfell disaster to discuss fire safety measures. As a result of the disaster, a quarter of adults surveyed feel more nervous/anxious about living in a rented apartment since the tragedy and the issues it exposed with regard to fire safety. Free toolkit A free toolkit of resources has been put together by the British Woodworking Federation (BWF) to provide information and fire safety advice, including a downloadable Responsible Person poster. Further information for fire, health and safety professionals can be found at firedoorsafetyweek.co.uk/advice/ Hannah Mansell, a spokesperson for Fire Door Safety Week, as well as BWF technical manager, chair of the Passive Fire Protection Forum and a trustee of the Children s Burns Trust, said: This new research shows that landlords and building owners still have a long way to go meet their fire safety responsibilities. It is astounding to learn that in the last three months so little has been done to address the concerns of tenants and residents. Many people do not realise that the real job of a fire door is to hold back fire, smoke and toxic gases, delaying the spread around a building and keeping the vital means of escape route clear. They only work properly if they are specified, manufactured, installed and maintained correctly, and of course, closed when a fire breaks out.

This is especially important in high rise buildings, houses of multiple occupancy and other types of shared sleeping accommodation. Checking fire doors should be part of a regular fire risk assessment. This should examine all aspects of fire safety management, including active and passive fire protection measures, signage, means of escape and the specific fire plan procedures. There needs to be crystal clarity about the Responsible Person and a total transformation of attitude towards fire safety of tenants in rented accommodation. Our focus for Fire Door Safety Week in this pivotal year is to ensure all landlords and tenants have the knowledge and resources they need to stay safe. Life-changing role of fire doors Dany Cotton, London Fire Commissioner who oversaw the fire and rescue service s response at Grenfell Tower, said: London Fire Brigade fully supports Fire Door Safety Week. This is an important campaign which drives home the potentially life-saving role that fire doors play in buildings, especially residential buildings such as tower blocks. It is extremely concerning that the lives of the public and our firefighters are still being put at risk by poorly maintained fire doors and people acting irresponsibly by removing self closers or by keeping doors wedged open. Good fire doors help stop fires from spreading.

Fires that spread put more lives at risk and I would urge everyone to check that their fire doors are properly maintained and kept shut. Remember they don t just protect you, but everybody in the building. Paul Fuller CBE, chief fire officer of Bedfordshire Fire and Rescue Service and chairman of the Fire Sector Federation, said: It is simple. Proper fire doors save lives, but only if they are correctly made and installed, and certainly not if they are wedged open or in disrepair. Too often our officers walk into a building and see fire doors in an appalling state. We do what we can to advise and enforce the responsibilities of a building owner, but it is time for the Responsible Person to really step up. That s why we are supporting Fire Door Safety Week there can be no excuse, all the resources you need to promote door safety are there on the website and free to download. National campaign Fire Door Safety Week, a national campaign now in its fifth year, is run by the BWF, the BWF-Certifire Scheme and the Fire Door Inspection Scheme, in partnership with the Government s Fire Kills campaign. It aims to raise awareness about the role of fire doors in preventing life changing injuries and the legal responsibilities of managing fire door safety.

Fire Door Safety Week 2017 took place from 25th September 1st October. This article originally appeared on IFSEC Global s sister site in health & safety, SHP Online Free Download: A Technical Guide to Fire Detection and Alarm Systems Fire legislation, which is written for the purpose of life safety, requires duty holders in non-domestic premises to assess fire risks and put in place arrangements for the prevention of fire and to protect people from fire when it occurs. This guide provides an overview of the need to know information for fire detection and alarm systems and your legal requirements, key actions, key terms and more.

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Why Do We Need Surveillance Cameras in Public Places …

With the ever-advancing technology field come conflicting opinions about what should and should not be used. One of the pieces of technology that causes a bit of controversy is surveillance cameras that are placed in public. Although some believe that they should not be used, they can be an important part of society and can be quite helpful.

Why Do We Need Surveillance Cameras In Public Places ...

Surveillance cameras are for safety. credit: Ingram Publishing/Ingram Publishing/Getty Images

Public Safety

Surveillance cameras can be used to keep an eye out for any crimes that are in progress or that can be stopped before they even start. If a suspicious person or item is in the area, the proper authorities can be informed before any crime can be committed or damage can be done. In addition, the area can be cleared of any people as a precautionary measure.

Can Help Catch a Criminal

If a crime is committed and there is a surveillance camera, there is a good chance that the authorities will be able to get a viable image of the criminal. The camera footage can be used to put the image on posters and aired on television where someone might be able to recognize who the person is. Without the surveillance camera, it may be more difficult to get a detailed description of the perpetrator.

Sense of Security

For some people, knowing that surveillance cameras are in certain areas can help create a sense of security. No one wants to fear having to go into an area or feel as though she is not safe. Some may believe that there may be less of a chance that a crime will be committed if there are cameras in the area watching over them.

Crime Prevention

Some businesses and authorities may place cameras in areas in hope that it will prevent crimes from being committed in the first place. If a person knows that there is a surveillance camera in a specific area, he may be less willing to commit a crime at that location for fear of being caught. Some cities are even putting, or have already put, surveillance cameras on stoplights in hopes that it will prevent people from speeding or committing other traffic offenses.

Evidence

In court, the footage from the surveillance camera that captured a crime can be used as evidence against the accused. Without the footage, there may be little to no evidence to go on and the criminal could go free.

In some cases, the footage may also help prove the innocence of someone who was accused of a crime, but did not commit it.

Grenfell inquiry begins: The numbers that lay bare the funding crisis hampering high-rise improvements

The government has ordered councils to review and upgrade fire safety in social housing across England and Wales. After decades of neglect, however, the bill for remedying myriad shortcomings is astronomical and many councils are nearly technically insolvent. The public inquiry into the Grenfell Tower fire opens today.

It s the start of a very long process, with the interim report due to be published in Easter. The inquiry s remit encompasses the cause and spread of the fire, high-rise regulations, and the actions of the local authority, Kensington and Chelsea Council. Residents and victims will watch retired judge Sir Martin Moore-Bick give a 45-minute statement. The fire, which killed at least 80 people in June, has pushed the fire safety debate beyond the fire-safety sector and into the national media. Long frustrated with being stonewalled by government, suddenly leading figures in the industry were thrust in front of TV cameras. The debate focused on cladding initially but has widened to almost every aspect of fire safety. So horrendous was the Grenfell tragedy that people are finally taking fire safety seriously in a way that never happened after Lakanal. That central and local government are finally taking the issue seriously is no cause to celebrate it shouldn t have taken such loss of life to jolt people into action. And where there s a will there isn t always a way where money is involved as our infographic below shows.

Free Download: The key to mitigating cybersecurity risks Exploiting IoT technology without creating cybersecurity vulnerabilities is one of the defining challenges in today s security landscape.

This report will help you to see why third parties should adhere to secure by design principles and why the necessary convergence of IT and security departments demands a holistic approach .

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DJI offers bug bounty to techies who can find software flaws in its drones

Drone security All-conquering drone manufacturer DJI is offering cash rewards to techies who can find security flaws in its software. The bug bounty program promises cash rewards of between $100 and $30,000 for anyone who can uncover privacy threats, safety issues, app crashes and any other vulnerabilities. The move comes about a month after reports emerged that the US Army was abandoning use of drone tech developed by DJI a Chinese-owned firm over cybersecurity fears.

A US Army memo obtained by UAS News said that due to increased awareness of cyber vulnerabilities associated with DJI products, it is directed that the US Army halt use of all DJI products. Many other tech companies have previously offered bounties for the same reason, with Apple offering up to $200,000 for hackers and researchers who identify security flaws in its products last year. Partnerships With an eye on winning back the favour of the US Army and securing government contracts, DJI is also forging partnerships with security researchers and has introduced a new internal approval process designed to uncover security problems before software is released to market. Founded in 2006, DJI has gained near total dominance of the drone market at all price points (apart from sub $500), partly thanks to aggressive price cutting. When DJI dropped its prices by up to 70% in less than a year it drove its nearest rival, 3D Robotics, out of business. The company, which is best known for its Phantom drones and the more recent Mavic Pro, also has has 1,500 people working on research and development, according to Colin Snow, founder of Skylogic Research, a drone research firm. Nobody else has that. DJI also benefited hugely from its partnerships with Sony for camera components and Apple, to get its products on the shelves of Apple stores. Global drone sales by units grew by 60% last year to 2.2 million, while revenues rose 36% to $4.5 billion, according to research firm Gartner.

Free Download: The security drones report 2017 The global security drones market will be worth $10.5bn ( 8bn) by 2020 . This report commissioned by Aviat Drones examines the prevalence, growth prospects , applications and regulatory challenges of drones and anti-drone tech in the global security market. Find out how you can benefit from this lucrative market .

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Fixed cameras will account for less than 50% of surveillance footage in five years time

Bjorn Skou Eilertsen, CTO of Milestone Systems, was thinking big in the Security Management Theatre on day three of IFSEC International. Speaking on the topic of how hardware-accelerated video content analysis and the internet of things will transform surveillance , he reflected on the changes disrupting the industry now and the paradigm shift still to come. With 90% of the world s data created in the last two years, the term big data doesn t even begin to encapsulate the magnitude of the data revolution, he argues.

Is big data even enough now? Gigantic data might be better, said Eilertsen. Despite the ubiquity of fixed CCTV cameras, they account for a shrinking share of surveillance footage as mobiles, body-worn cameras and drones proliferate. We believe that in less than five years from now, more than 50% of streams managed by video management systems will not be from fixed cameras, he predicted. Aggregation, automation and augmentation A trinity of aggregation, automation and augmentation will equip the industry to accommodate the burgeoning volume of data, said Eilertsen, who joined Milestone in 2013 having worked for both IBM and Microsoft. Aggregation happens all around you, he explained. Only a few years ago it would be a fixed camera, fixed sensors, very rule-based. But now there are 285 million surveillance cameras in operation. That s only a fraction, because everything is being captured on mobile.

With neural networks we can start predicting behaviour. Bjorn Skou Eilertsen, CTO, Milestone Systems How do we automate these things? This is where our vision of intelligent data plays a role. Deep learning plays a role. Augmentation: how do we put these things together? So a vast amount of information is being gathered. This is why a lot is going to happen on the service side. People think it will be on the edge, out there on a single device. Eilertsen pointed out that Data is already being aggregated from multiple sources in an automated process deployed on assembly lines in manufacturing plants.

Aggregating forms patterns, but it s so much information petabyte after petabyte of video and sensor information. What will we do with it? Who is going to look at the patterns and figure out what the intelligence is? That is where the important changes are coming in terms of AI, deep learning and neural networks. For simple systems with only a few components, it s fairly easy to make rule-based analytics and go with the flow. However: When you start aggregating data so big and complicated that humans simply cannot operate them, that s where automation and augmentation come in. Neural networks The shackles are now off thanks to quantum leaps in technology. This has been difficult to do for a long time because conventional CPUs cannot compute fast enough. That s changing now with the introduction of the GPU, said Eilertsen.

The GPU is a multicore computer. It changes the way we can make models, neural networks. It makes a lot of different ways of working the data. The days of having one company try and do everything is over in my opinion. Bjorn Skou Eilertsen, CTO, Milestone Systems He refers to a prototype that can show 1,500 surveillance cameras, to full HD quality, continuously recording, including motion detection. For those who can t do the maths, that s 45,000 frames a second. It is very, very difficult to do on regular computer hardware. He says there is a big shift away from conventional, rule-based analytics to systems managed by neural networks. Neural networks, deep learning algorithms and artificial intelligence are not based on fixed outcomes.

The problem about today s analytics is it s a predetermined outcome. With neural networks we can start predicting behaviour, he says. However, human operators will still have a role to play. How do we make machine intelligence combine with human intelligence? The point is to enable people to make faster and better decisions. He says this new paradigm has huge potential in the field of body-worn video for law enforcement. You can take all the aggregated media from years back, days back, minutes back, and time-lapse it. They identify all different objects and put them into a sequence, so a one-hour video can be reviewed in one minute. That s a really good example of how we start adding human interaction based on machine learning.

It really makes it a lot easier to work with these systems. Collaboration Collaboration with partners has long been part of Milestone s modus operandi, but its importance is growing further still. The aggregation, automation and augmentation will transform the entire industry, says Eilertsen. But it s impossible to do alone. For a very long time it s been everyone on their own trying to make their own analytics a little bit better than the rest. But it s really holding back innovation. What Milestone and the Milestone community is really about is enabling everyone to participate. If he s correct about the industry s direction of travel then the changes ahead are nothing short of revolutionary. The days of having one company try and do everything is over in my opinion.

We all need to collectively move forward. I think in five years when we look back at the industry, we ll have two ways of looking at it. One person will say: Why did we miss it, why didn t we see what was happening? The other, more interesting way is: How did we use our imagination, how did we change the rules, set the agenda and change the industry? We need to think as a community. We need to start innovating together, and we can move a lot faster. Free download: The video surveillance report 2017 Sponsored by IDIS The Video Surveillance Report 2017 covers all things video surveillance based on a poll of hundreds of security professionals.

Specifically looking at topics such as open platforms, 4K, low-light cameras, video analytics, warranties and this year due to the growing threat posed, the cybersecurity landscape.

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Help us lobby the EU to make our buildings safer: Fire Safe Europe

Fire Safe Europe is urging people to sign a petition imploring the EU to take concerted action to remedy shortcomings in building regulations, their enforcement and fire safety practices. Why is this important? Fire kills 11 people every day in the European Union (EU).

Apart from major tragedies, like the Grenfell Tower fire in London, we don t often hear about them. Yet there are 5,000 fire incidents each day in the EU, and they affect communities deeply. Lives are lost, people are injured, jobs, businesses, firefighters, and the environment are affected. We assume that new buildings are more fire safe, but they are increasingly highly insulated and airtight, with more combustibles, which makes fires grow faster than ever before and become more hazardous. Whereas in the 1950s, it took about 25 minutes for a room to be engulfed in flames, now it takes 3-5 minutes. Fires affect EU citizens, and you have an opportunity now to ask the EU to improve fire safety in buildings. Why do we need to act now? After the Grenfell Tower tragedy, the European Parliament has taken the initiative to start a debate on fire safety in buildings. This debate will happen on Wednesday 13 September 2017: This is your chance to ask for fire safety in buildings to be improved.

Sign today , and help us make our buildings safer for all. A little more information We are Fire Safe Europe, a European alliance which aims to raise the profile of fire safety in buildings and we are asking the European Institutions to: Make changes to ensure that tests to evaluate the performance of facades in a fire are based on real life situations where fires can be large scale. Introduce requirements to test the toxic smoke from construction products, and to label those products with their results so that builders and consumers can make informed choices. Develop a European Fire Safety Strategy: Many EU policies impact fire safety, a focussed strategy would enable the EU to have a coordinated approach to fire safety in buildings. Building fires affect people: there are at least 5,000 fire incidents each day in the EU. Each year in Europe, approximately 70,000 people are admitted to hospitals with severe fire related injuries. Worldwide, children make up 30% of injuries and fatalities caused by fire. Firefighters are especially heavily impacted. Building fires affect the environment: Fires cause massive amounts of air pollution.

They deplete materials and increase carbon emissions, a major challenge for sustainable resource management. Building fires have a cost: ‘ 126 billion is eaten up by fire damage each year. For European countries, it is 1% of their GDP. Fire can lead to major infrastructure, data and stock loss, less productivity, staff unemployment, and even bankruptcy. About Fire Safe Europe Fire Safe Europe (FSEU) is a broad and unique cross-sectorial alliance of fire experts, fire fighters, European associations, and international companies, including construction manufacturers and material suppliers of insulation, cable, concrete, ceiling, and fire protection equipment. FSEU s mission is to improve fire safety in buildings for European citizens. Free Download: The key to mitigating cybersecurity risks Exploiting IoT technology without creating cybersecurity vulnerabilities is one of the defining challenges in today s security landscape.

This report will help you to see why third parties should adhere to secure by design principles and why the necessary convergence of IT and security departments demands a holistic approach .

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They d never seen a black firefighter before

Interview LFB staff take part in the Pride in London parade 2016 (photo: Katy Blackwood, under CC.4.0) Black and minority ethnic (BAME) firefighters only make up 3.8% of employees in England s fire service, yet account for 14.6% of the total population, according to Home Office figures. The service is also male-dominated, with just 5% of firefighters in England and 6.5% UK-wide being female. A black firefighter has recounted how upon joining the London fire brigade (LFB) in 1990, people were patting me on the shoulder and clapping when they saw him emerging from a fire engine because they d never seen a black firefighter before.

If that sounds friendly enough, then Michael or Micky Nicholas also experienced discriminatory language and behaviour in his formative days at the LFB. I didn t have a particularly nice time when I first joined, he admits. Last year, Theresa May, then Home Secretary, criticised fire and rescue services for being 96% white and 95% male and for its culture of bullying and harassment . But speaking to the Guardian, Nicholas, 53, implies that things have improved somewhat when he says: Many years ago I couldn t even think of encouraging my kids to being in what I saw as a fairly negative environment for black people and for women. Now, certainly in the London Fire Brigade, I would support that dare I say encourage it. Nicholas is secretary of the Fire Brigades Union s (FBU) black and ethnic minority members section and involved in drawing up the LFB s 10-year inclusion strategy, which aims to increase the number of BAME recruits from 13% to 25% and of operational female recruits from 7% to 18% by 2026. Read the full interview on the Guardian.