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BT Redcare gives installers chance to tickets to shows at iconic venues

BT Redcare is giving its installers the chance to win tickets to top events at iconic venues around the UK. Installers registering Classic and GSM installations between now and 31 March 2018 can be entered into a monthly draw, from which two winners will receive tickets to events at the O2, Wembley, Liverpool Echo Arena, Twickenham and more. BT Redcare is also offering alarm receiving centres discounts on its products throughout the same period.

For the next six months the company has slashed the price on its Classic and GSM products. Contact your ARC to find out more. Register your Classic and GSM installations here. Terms and conditions apply. BT Redcare says you can direct any queries to your account manager or by email to [email protected] Free Download: The key to mitigating cybersecurity risks Exploiting IoT technology without creating cybersecurity vulnerabilities is one of the defining challenges in today s security landscape. This report will help you to see why third parties should adhere to secure by design principles and why the necessary convergence of IT and security departments demands a holistic approach .

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E-learning and counter-terror training are increasingly popular, survey reveals

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT More than half of security professionals cited counter terror as an area they d like to train up in, according to a survey about training needs in the industry. Asked which topics they are most keen to upskill in, respondents most commonly said security management (63%), followed by security consultancy (61%), counter-terrorism (55%) and crisis management (47%). The survey, which was conducted by the Linx International Group, also reveals that continuous professional development (76%) is the biggest motive for undertaking training, followed by certification/training (71%) and personal development (64%).

Just over half (51%) of all respondents who are employed in a range of sectors, both public and private paid for training themselves, while 45% were funded by their organisation and 4% were financed by other means. Most security professionals said training had a meaningful benefit to themselves, their organisation and the security industry as a whole but the biggest benefit was to their own career prospects (81% recognised the benefits versus 74% for the industry as a whole and 68% for their organisation). Classroom-based training remains the most popular teaching method, e-learning is growing more popular. Some 60% of respondents having already taken part in some form of e-learning and 70% likely to do so in the future. A majority of respondents also expect their participation in distance learning, blended learning and training led by a virtual instructor, to rise. There is a clear trend towards upskilling and individuals taking responsibility for their own career development, as well as demand from industry for better qualified, certified and accredited professionals, said Ken Livingstone, group training director of the Linx International Group, which provides security, risk management and training services. This is evident through our support of the CTSP a professional register of Certified Technical Security Professionals with applications for Registration already in the hundreds within the first month of its launch. Linx International Group surveyed 1,000 respondents from around the world, with UK and Ireland accounting or 49.46%, followed by Africa (19%), mainland Europe (13%), Middle East (8%), Asia (5%), US and Central America (4%) and Australasia (1%). The research was conducted by the Linx International Group on behalf of its group companies: Linx Consultancy, ARC Training, Perpetuity Academy and Tavcom Training.

Free Download: The key to mitigating cybersecurity risks Exploiting IoT technology without creating cybersecurity vulnerabilities is one of the defining challenges in today s security landscape.

This report will help you to see why third parties should adhere to secure by design principles and why the necessary convergence of IT and security departments demands a holistic approach .

Download now Related Topics Security to be tightened at Christmas markets amid fears of Berlin-style attack At least 50 reported dead and 400 injured in Las Vegas shooting Finalists announced for the Security & Fire Excellence Awards 2017

Watch: The funding crisis hampering fire safety upgrades in UK tower blocks

Free Download: A Technical Guide to Fire Precautions and Fire Protection Current fire-safety legislation adopts a risk-based approach to fire safety in community, industrial and business premises.

This download covers legal requirements for responsible persons under the FSO, courtesy of BIFM and USHA approved UK providers of health, safety and environmental information.

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Security to be tightened at Christmas markets amid fears of Berlin-style attack

COUNTER TERROR Security will be bolstered at forthcoming Christmas markets around the UK as councils aim to prevent a repeat of the Berlin attack that left 12 dead and 56 injured last year. Concrete bollards, armed police and random bag searches are among the measures being considered by police and local councils. The Local Government Association is reported to have urged councils to adhere to government guidance on protecting crowded places from attack.

Some Christmas market organisers are working with police to provide anti-terror training to staff as part of Project Griffin, a counter-terrorism initiative aimed at businesses. Depending on the terror threat level currently severe (an attack is highly likely) at the time, armed officers could be stationed around markets perimeter. Councils are stressing, however, that an armed police presence does not necessarily mean that an attack is imminent. Demand for concrete bollards has surged in the last two years following a series of attacks including incidents in Nice, Berlin and London Bridge where terrorists have weaponised vehicles in order to inflict mass casualties. Physical barriers were installed on three of London s bridges in the wake of June s terror attack at London Bridge and Borough Market. A Southampton city council spokesman has confirmed that concrete bollards will be installed ahead of 11 November when the city s own Christmas market opens. However, temporary outdoor events like Christmas markets and street festivals also require temporary solutions and the market is responding. ATG Access, for instance, has launched a lightweight road block system that can be deployed quickly and withstand the force of a 2,500kg vehicle traveling at 30 miles per hour. Avon Barrier Corporation, another UK firm, is even considering how to provide protection from gunfire.

Speaking to Arab News in August, Paul Jeffrey, the company s managing director, said: We are also looking at advertising boarding, so you incorporate some kind of ballistic protection within an advertising boarding so people run and hide. I am working on some very big projects that include that sort of thing. In London, the Metropolitan Police Service has said that additional safety measures around Christmas markets like Hyde Park s Winter Wonderland are likely. The public may see additional protective security measures and barriers at events this year, in response to a number of vehicle-based terrorist attacks we have sadly seen both here in the UK and abroad, said a force spokesman. There could also be increased security checks at some events and venues so we advise the public to arrive in plenty of time to allow for this. Guidance for mitigating security vulnerabilities around major public transport hubs, recently issued by the Department for Transport to local authorities, also incorporated recommendations about deterring attackers using vehicles as a weapon . German Christmas markets have proliferated in the UK in the last two decades and are regularly packed with people, day and night. Free Download: Securing the UK s borders. Getting national security and Brexit right first time is crucial , we do not want to get this wrong.

This report considers the implications of leaving the EU for the management of the UK s borders and making it as easy as possible for international business to thrive and legitimate movement to occur in a post-Brexit UK.

Click here to download now Related Topics At least 50 reported dead and 400 injured in Las Vegas shooting Finalists announced for the Security & Fire Excellence Awards 2017 How evolving terror tactics have driven advances in perimeter security

S2 Security launches cloud-based S2 Cumulus

System monitoring S2 Security has launched a cloud-based service for management and monitoring of S2 products as well as critical communication between people, devices and third-party systems. S2 Cumulus features system health monitoring, software license management, remote software updates and automatic alerts to changes in system status. S2 Secuity, a specialist in enterprise physical security solutions says the cloud gives it scope to develop services like virtual credential acquisition and management, video stream sharing, remote mustering and communication with third-party systems.

Integrators, who can organise and view critical information about registered S2 systems from a centralised dashboard, can be notified of changes in system status via email or text message alerts, thereby detecting and resolving problems faster. Software updates and licence management/renewals can be performed remotely thus lowering costs related to onsite visits. S2 Cumulus supports S2 NetBox series access control and event monitoring systems, S2 NetVR series video management systems and the S2 Magic Monitor unified client.

All S2 product lines will become compatible by the end of 2018. Cumulus represents an enormous advantage for S2 system owners, said John L Moss, CEO of the S2 Security. We ve created the backbone for providing new cloud services to our integrators, our end users and our end users people.

Related Topics OPTEX revamps VX Shield (VXS) outdoor intrusion sensor New cloud surveillance brand will revolutionise fight against fraudulent slip, trip and fall claims, says founder Online training tool launched for fire-door inspectors

Online training tool launched for fire-door inspectors

Fire door safety week A free online tool that provides Europe s first competency framework for fire door inspectors has been launched by the Fire Door Inspection Scheme (FDIS). Developed in time for Fire Door Safety Week (25 September-1 October 2017), it also features an introduction to the FDIS Diploma in Fire Doors. The service, which is relevant to anyone responsible for specifying, selling, installing or maintaining any aspect of fire doors, is a more comprehensive follow-up to a half-day bite size training course launched by FDIS earlier this year.

FDIS, Europe s first fire door inspection scheme, says it developed the courses to meet growing demand for training in the legal and practical dimensions of fire door inspection. The lack of basic knowledge about fire doors is a real challenge to all parts of the industry, and we felt this was something simple that we could do to help, said Kevin Hulin, FDIS manager. There are now 30 inspectors operating throughout the UK accredited through the FDIS process and we have had more than 1,100 people sign up to study the diploma. This new course is an introduction to the diploma, tailored for the generalist who needs to know the basics and also needs to be able to recognise when to bring in an expert. I hope it will also encourage them to continue their studies further, and support the challenge laid down by the Fire Door Safety Week team to make our building stock that bit safer. You can get a free seven-day trial of the tool here. Fire professionals can also earn a diploma in Fire Doors via FDIS online learning centre and become certificated fire door inspectors through independent assessments by Exova Warringtonfire. Launched in 2012 FDIS was a joint venture between the BWF-Certifire Scheme and Guild of Architectural Ironmongers. IFSEC Global is proud to support Fire Door Safety Week, which runs from 25 September to 1 October.

You can pledge your support for the campaign here, and by tweeting under the hashtag #FireDoorSafetyWeek and sharing or using the wealth of resources found in the campaign s toolkit.

Related Topics Equifax will be first of many victims of Apache Struts vulnerability, says cyber specialist Shocking levels of neglect and complacency among responsible persons reported by fire installers GDPR gives CCTV operators chance to tackle negative image head-on , says white paper

Equifax will be first of many victims of Apache Struts vulnerability, says cyber specialist

PATCHING PROBLEMS Equifax is probably just the first known victim of a software vulnerability that could take years to remedy, a top cyber expert has warned. Credit monitoring company Equifax recently revealed that hackers gained access to names, social security numbers, dates of birth, addresses and driver s license numbers of 143 million Americans between mid-May and July of this year. Credit card numbers for about 209,000 US consumers were also accessed.

Traced to a vulnerability in a web app framework called Apache Struts CVE-2017-5638, the Equifax breach is the biggest-ever theft of social security numbers, eclipsing the 2015 hack at health insurer Anthem Inc that exposed the personal data of 80 million people. While it isn t the biggest data breach in history Yahoo claims that mantle it could be the most damaging, because the data stolen is routinely used to verify people s identity by banks and other institutions. A patch for Apache Struts, a commonly used open source component used by companies to absorb and process data, was apparently available at the time of the breach. We should expect a long tail of incidents and breaches in the months and potentially years to come. Jeff Luszcz, vice president, product management, Flexera Unpatched systems According to Flexera Vulnerability Review 2017, patches were available at the time of disclosure for 81% of the vulnerabilities in 2016. The WannaCry attacks in May also exploited unpatched systems, which hackers can do faster than organisations can patch them up. Equifax is probably just the first known victim, said Jeff Luszcz, vice president of product management at Flexera, which provides tracking for open source components, vulnerability intelligence and tools to simplify remediation. Once a case like this hits the news, it ignites the fire in the cybercrime community and hackers start poking around for new opportunities. We should expect a long tail of incidents and breaches in the months and potentially years to come, as we still see attacks targeting Heartbleed, a vulnerability more than three years old.

Offering tips on how organisations can protect themselves, Kasper Lindgaard, senior director of secunia research at Flexera, said: Patching this type of vulnerability is certainly not as simple as patching a desktop application. When it comes to vulnerabilities affecting the software supply chain, it s important to align software design and engineering, operational and security requirements. This isn t an easy task. However, the time frames of initial disclosure of the vulnerability and its patch on March 7 up to two months before the first reported unauthorised access at Equifax, and the further delay of the actual detection of the breach on July 29 currently indicates that the vulnerability was not handled with the priority that it should have. This is a common issue across industries that business leaders need to address rather sooner than later. Free Download: the CyberSecurity Crashcourse Are you even aware if you have been the victim of a cybersecurity breach? This report will help you to find out and protect yourself, Eric Hansleman from 451 Research presents a rapid-fire overview of cybersecurity , because a firewall just won t do, you need multi-layered defences to truly protect your data.

Click here to download now Related Topics Shocking levels of neglect and complacency among responsible persons reported by fire installers GDPR gives CCTV operators chance to tackle negative image head-on , says white paper HID Global to buy Mercury Security Products from ACRE LLC

GDPR gives CCTV operators chance to tackle negative image head-on , says white paper

DATA PROTECTION A white paper exploring the implications for CCTV of the forthcoming GDPR has been published by cloud-based surveillance company Cloudview. The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into force across the EU including the UK from 25 May 2018. The upper limit of possible penalties has been raised considerably: organisations found in breach of the law could be fined amounts up to 79 times greater than those levied under the existing data protection regime.

When installing a new system or upgrading an old system, any CCTV user or service provider will be expected to identify security risks and how those risks are to be addressed. Excerpt from Watching the Watchers Watching the Watchers: CCTV, the GDPR and the third wave of Data Privacy Regulation charts the history of data protection law, examines the changes introduced by the GDPR, identifies a shift from compliance to accountability , offers advice to CCTV operators and asks whether the new law might present an opportunity as well as a legal and administrative burden. Indeed, the white paper s introduction offers a positive take on a law that is causing great anxiety for organisations in most sectors: The CCTV industry has, almost from its inception, been portrayed in popular culture as the unofficial face of unaccountable surveillance overreach and invasion of privacy, it says. This position has been cemented by a popular perception of a lack of transparency and public engagement on the part of its users. More recently, it has become the unwilling poster child for the hazards of engaging with the Internet of Things. The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) thus provides a welcome opportunity for the CCTV industry and its users to tackle this negative image head-on. The paper has been written by Andrew Charlesworth, a reader in IT and Law and director of the Centre for IT and Law at the University of Bristol (CITL). Cloudview which commissioned the report, provides a service that mobilises cloud computing and IoT technology to centralise and store visual data from CCTV systems, meaning the data can be analysed like any other form of big data. Connected to analogue or IP cameras, Cloudview securely transports visual data to cloud servers that the company says are secure and resilient.

Once stored, it can be instantly accessed, used and managed from anywhere on any device. Free Download: the CyberSecurity Crashcourse Are you even aware if you have been the victim of a cybersecurity breach? This report will help you to find out and protect yourself, Eric Hansleman from 451 Research presents a rapid-fire overview of cybersecurity , because a firewall just won t do, you need multi-layered defences to truly protect your data.

Click here to download now Related Topics

Women in Security Awards 2017: Winners announced

Picture above, left to right: Richard Jenkins (NSI), Michelle Bailey (Active Response ) Keeley Watson (Wilson James), Samantha Bamford (Pelco by Schneider), Siobhan Plunkett (GSLS), Roy Cooper (Professional Security magazine) Samantha Bamford from Pelco by Schneider, Michelle Bailey from Active Response, Siobhan Plunkett from GSLS and Keeley Watson from Wilson James have triumphed in the Women in Security Awards 2017. Hosted by the National Security Inspectorate (NSI) and organised by Professional Security Magazine, the ceremony took place on 14 September aboard the Harmony cruise boat of Bateaux London on the River Thames. The awards were founded six years ago by Una Riley, CEO of iAudit Consultants, to recognise the outstanding achievements of women working in the security sector.

Here is confirmation of the victors, chosen from among more than 150 nominations, across four categories: Technical Samantha Bamford, Pelco by Schneider Contribution to industry Michelle Bailey, Active Response (NSI Guarding Gold-approved) Best manager Siobhan Plunkett, GSLS Frontline Keeley Watson, Wilson James (NSI Guarding Gold-approved) Left to right: Richard Jenkins (NSI), Dianne Gettinby (NSI), Javeria Ayaz Malik (ActionAid International), Roy Cooper (Professional Security magazine) Some 120 guests attended the black tie event, which featured a welcome address from NSI CEO Richard Jenkins and a four-course dinner. And Javeria Ayaz Malik, international security advisor and head of the staff security department at ActionAid International, delivered an address on coordinating the organisation s safety and security policy and establishing external relationships with global security networks. Roy Cooper, publisher of Professional Security Magazine, and Una Riley introduced the awards. It was a pleasure to host these awards and see so many people gather to celebrate achievements of women within our industry, said Richard Jenkins. The evening was a huge success and we were delighted with the number of nominations received. The security sector has a wealth of varied and fulfilling roles, including product development, technical support, managerial and frontline and it s encouraging to see more and more women choosing careers which have been traditionally male dominated. I congratulate last night s winners and finalists on their outstanding achievements and contribution and have no doubt they will help to inspire other women to take forward their careers in the security sector. NSI certifies security companies by auditing their compliance with relevant British and European standards, codes of practice and certification schemes. The IFSEC International team Free Download: The key to mitigating cybersecurity risks Exploiting IoT technology without creating cybersecurity vulnerabilities is one of the defining challenges in today s security landscape.

This report will help you to see why third parties should adhere to secure by design principles and why the necessary convergence of IT and security departments demands a holistic approach .

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Three data breaches that should alarm the healthcare industry

Recent data breaches from the past several years seem to be following a trend. More and more target health service providers, and it s little wonder why. Few industries regularly hold as much sensitive data as the health industry.

Everyone including researchers, insurance providers and doctors keeps not only sensitive health information, but also billing data and unique identifiers, such as social security numbers. While plenty of legislation aims to provide extra protections for patient data, the fact is that anywhere there are humans, there will be errors. What happens in the doctor s office may not be as confidential as we all hope. Here are three of the most recent data breaches in the health industry. Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield This disaster was one of the biggest data breaches of 2016. The health insurance company is one of the top Medicare providers and partners, and in July, it announced a breach of Medicare members data. Over 18,000 Medicare recipients received notification that their data was no longer secure. Retirees and the elderly have always been a favorite target for spammers and fraudsters. This breach increases their risk significantly.

According to Anthem, the attack came through one of their vendors, LaunchPoint Ventures. Indiana Medicaid Due to an oversight, Indiana s Health Coverage Program left an active hyperlink open that gave direct access to Medicaid recipients information. This data breach revealed full names, addresses, Medicaid ID numbers, doctor information, patient numbers and more. The state of Indiana had over one million people enrolled in their Medicaid programme this April, and the information was available starting in February of this year. The hyperlink was available to the public, so it s difficult to say who had access to the information. Fortunately, Indiana s Health Coverage Program believes the breach has caused no damage to patients. They have offered all notified individuals a free year of credit protection, however, just to be safe. Washington State University This April, Washington State University discovered that a hard drive containing sensitive information concerning survey participants had been stolen. The hard drive was kept in a locked safe, but the safe itself was stolen from storage and has not been found.

Approximately one million individuals may be compromised by this breach. Most survey participants provided names and social security numbers, which are a valuable prize for identity fraudsters. Some participants health data may also be jeopardized. Although there is no sign of the stolen hard drive or its protective safe, WSU has notified all parties put at risk by the breach. Like Indiana s Medicaid programme, WSU has offered a year of free credit monitoring for every notified individual. The university is also taking measures to upgrade and strengthen security procedures to ensure this kind of incident does not happen again. Unfortunately, these three examples are only the tip of the iceberg. New reports and notifications keep hitting the news. Even doctors aren t safe from ransomware.

Ultimately, there is little patients can do to protect themselves, and the burden of responsibility falls heavily on the healthcare industry itself. Free Download: the CyberSecurity Crashcourse Are you even aware if you have been the victim of a cybersecurity breach? This report will help you to find out and protect yourself, Eric Hansleman from 451 Research presents a rapid-fire overview of cybersecurity , because a firewall just won t do, you need multi-layered defences to truly protect your data.

Click here to download now Related Topics Healthcare fire safety: The innovation that outperforms conventional smoke detectors on false alarms and early detection Architect says sprinkler installation at Glasgow Hospital was used as an excuse to flout other buildings standards NHS cyber-attack: cybersecurity experts reflect on the lessons