interview

London 2012, the ATP Tour and the Kings of Leon incident: Fire safety at the O2 Arena

Paul Andrews, project manager at AEG Europe, has played a major role in the fire safety operation at the O2 Arena in London. Below he gives a detailed account of the fire protection/safety systems and fire-engineered strategy at the erstwhile Millennium Dome, including measures implemented for concerts, the 2012 Olympic Games and the ATP tennis tour. IFSEC Global: Hi, Paul.

Please tell us a bit about your role at the O2 Paul Andrews: I ve been working at The O2 since its opening in 2007. For the first four years I worked in the in the building services team. My job was to maintain the fire alarm system and coordinate the maintenance of the other fire protection systems across the venue. Unfortunately the venue had a serious fire incident in December of 2010. The Kings of Leon were due to play a number of concerts, but on the first morning, whilst the production team were loading-in the stage, a tour bus caught fire in the arena s service yard. The fire was extinguished by the London Fire Brigade. Their swift actions, coupled with the efforts on the in-house teams, meant that the incident only lasted for a matter of hours on that fateful day. Essentially the band still could have played that night, but the mutual decision was for the show not to take place. Off of the back of that and due to other restructuring taking place, the business created an enhanced role in the health and safety team, the role of fire safety manager, and since 2011 I ve been in that role for AEG.

Both the building services and health and safety teams are part of the facilities department. The O2 concourse (photo: Liam Daly under CC 2.0) CW: What was the thinking behind this restructuring? PA: I don t know how well you know the changes in fire legislation over the last 10 years but, basically, in 2005 there was a change in UK fire legislation. The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 (RRO) was created and enforced in 2006. For premises like The O 2, prior to 2006 the London Fire Brigade would carry out an annual audit and issue a fire certificate to say everything s OK . With the introduction of the new legislation this responsibility was placed back on the businesses and the employees (competent people) who work at the premises. The implementation of the new legislation roughly coincided with the opening The O2. IG: It s quite an unusual structure you have to protect PA: The building formerly the Millennium Dome initially opened in 2000 for the Millennium Experience. It was only open for a year to celebrate the coming of the third millennium, but even today there are lots of bits about the building, infrastructure-wise, that we ve inherited from the legacy of The Dome .

The building sits on the Greenwich Peninsula at the edge of South East London. Its western edge is passed by the Prime Meridian, which is the birthplace of time. The O2 has 12 iconic yellow support masts that jut out from the fabric to represent the 12 months of the year and the 12 hours on a clock face The building is constructed out of tensioned fabric over a skeleton of steel. Of the many large domes worldwide which share this construction scheme, the Millennium Dome is one of the largest. Symbolism was key to the design of the dome and there are many symbolic pieces of the structure. It has 12 iconic yellow support masts that jut out from the fabric that represent the 12 months of the year and the 12 hours on a clock face. This is an attempt to pay homage to the role of Greenwich mean time and the prime meridian. The circular dome shape also has a diameter of 365 metres to represent the days of the year. The centre of the dome is a full 52 metres tall to represent the 52 weeks in each year.

Prince s 2007 performance at the O2 IG: Can you give us an overview of fire safety tech and procedures in what is such an unusual building? PA: From a fire safety point of view, due to the bespoke design and construction, compliance with normal building regulations wasn t exactly possible. So we have what s known as a fire-engineered strategy. It s a unique combination of comprehensive fire protection and detection systems, plus a strict set of fire safety management rules that have to be adhered to. The venue has a number of perspex shutters that raise automatically when the fire alarm goes off and essentially they re our final fire exits The biggest challenge in terms of fire is because we are an enclosed environment, if we were to have a fire, how do we vent the smoke from The O2? One of the legacy items from the dome design is right on top of the roof. We have a number of smoke vents which open when the fire alarm is activated to assist with smoke ventilation. In each one of the structural yellow support masts there s a large smoke extract fan. These systems assist with the problem of venting the smoke out of the space if there is an incident.

Around the perimeter of the building we also have some unique assets from the history of the dome. The venue has a number of perspex shutters that raise automatically when the fire alarm goes off and essentially they re our final fire exits. So they re just some of the main quirky things that we ve inherited from the old design of the Millennium Dome and that we have to maintain even now almost 20 years later. Inside the arena we ve got pretty much the full complement of fire safety arrangements: a comprehensive, networked fire alarm system throughout the whole venue with a PAVA, audible warning system. There are certain areas of the fire alarm system where we ve got an aspirating type of smoke detection, called VESDAs very early smoke detection apparatus. That includes inside the auditorium itself at high level. We ve got a couple of areas inside the arena that have sprinkler coverage. One of those areas is the loading bay where we had the fire; the second area is the American Express invites lounge. All kitchen canopies at the venue incorporate a UV filtration system, which use UVC rays to break down grease particles in extracted cooking smoke/air Around the perimeter of The O2 Arena is The Avenue , which is where all the bars and restaurants are still inside the building!.

All of the buildings there have sprinklers throughout. Due to the higher risks associated with these premises higher fire risk because of the kitchens and cooking activities sprinklers are included to mitigate that risk. As you can imagine we ve got fire extinguishers in all areas of the site. All the restaurants units on The Avenue and the catering kitchens in the arena have a special arrangement in terms of extraction, which is quite unique as well. All of the kitchen canopies at the venue incorporate a UV filtration system, which use UVC rays to break down the grease particles in extracted cooking smoke/air. IG: Is that common in restaurants in general? PA: In some, but not others, but again, it s one of the stipulations of our fire engineering strategy at the O2. All 27 plus restaurants and bars have to follow our fire safety requirements inside The O2. Prospective tenants may or may not have done it in their other restaurant franchises across the country but they had to comply here.

Entrance to Cineworld (photo: Zeisterre under CC by SA-3.0) IG: What about firefighter access and evacuation routes? PA: There are four main firefighting staircases in the arena. During an evacuation spectators would use one of these four protected staircases each, which also consist of a firefighting lift. The O2 also has its own private fire hydrant water main onsite. In terms of fire brigade access, having the luxury of those perspex shutters at regular frequencies around the perimeter means they can access where need be in the event of an emergency. They re big enough to get a fire engine inside. So there s a clear route round the arena itself and around the perimeter of the venue. So they can utilise those fire hydrants and everything else. IG: Have any particular events posed the biggest challenges?

PA: The biggest event that I ve been lucky to part of to date was the Olympic Games in 2012, The O2 (was called the North Greenwich Arena for the duration of the Olympics) hosted the gymnastics and the finals of the basketball and the Paralympic basketball events as well. For some of larger events like the Olympics, organisers can erect temporary structures to support the main event in the arena. In previous years, for the Brit Awards for example- they will build a marquee structure for an after show party. Similarly for the world finals of the ATP tennis tour; hospitality structures & practice tennis courts and more are housed in temporary structures. Each and every time, as per the requirements of our fire engineered strategy, a fire detection system will installed throughout all of those marquees. We work with an external fire design consultant to scrutinise all of the construction materials that are used to make sure that fire size/fire loading limits of the existing smoke ventilation systems are complied with and not exceeded. It is very common for special effects to be part of the production for an incoming arena event. Whether its pyrotechnics, lasers, water effects all is demonstrated to the licensing team at Greenwich council. CW: Do you have to work closely with LFB?

PA: Yes. Because of our fire engineered strategy and these rules and requirements that we have to enforce, the LFB have also enforced what s known as an alterations notice on the venue. That s not a bad thing, like the HSE handing out an improvement or enforcement notice. An alterations notice means that if any physical or non-physical change to the existing fire precautions is planned, we have to notify the London Fire Brigade of how we plan to manage the risk. We may also notify our insurers, Greenwich building control and the Greenwich licensing team. Visit FIREX International for cutting-edge solutions, essential knowledge and the ability to grow your business by getting direct access to the whole fire safety industry. It is the perfect place to get your product in front of thousands of buyers, across a multitude of featured areas.

From the brand new Drone Zone, the ARC Village, ASFP Passive Protection Zone, the Engineers of Tomorrow competition and more, it s all under one roof so you ll never miss a beat.

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Dell EMC Q&A: open platforms, body-worn cameras and end-to-end security solutions

Part of the group most famous for manufacturing desktop PCs, Dell EMC specialises in hybrid cloud and big-data solutions, built on converged infrastructure, servers, storage and cybersecurity technologies for enterprise customers. SecuritySolutionsWatch.com spoke to the brand s recently appointed general manager for surveillance and security, Ken Mills. We are delighted to provide an excerpt below.

Ken Mills, Dell EMC SecuritySolutionsWatch.com: Thank you for joining us again today Ken at this momentous time in the history of Dell EMC. Before drilling down a bit into all that s new: congratulations on your appointment as general manager for surveillance and security! Please give us an overview of the Dell EMC surveillance solutions portfolio. Ken Mills: Dell EMC is focused on delivering the best-in-class solutions for the surveillance market in networking, compute, storage, virtualisation, security, client and cloud. We are also focused on building joint solutions with our OEM customers/partners to bring even more value to our end users. Our customers are truly the future-makers, and we are enabling them to innovate faster, build stronger and scale smarter. Stay tuned for a number of announcements for the surveillance market from Dell EMC and our customers. SSW: Are there product announcements on the horizon from Dell EMC too? KM: It is an exciting time to be at Dell EMC right now.

Dell Technologies is now number one in everything, all in one place, and we are bringing this world-class portfolio to the surveillance market. Never before, have our customers and partners been able to modernise their surveillance infrastructure with an end-to-end portfolio like we have at Dell EMC. We are leveraging the same industry-recognised surveillance lab to expand our validated solutions to include the entire Dell EMC portfolio. This is a huge step forward for the industry where for the first time, our customers and partners can purchase with confidence all of their surveillance infrastructure needs from one place: Dell EMC. Read the full interview on SecuritySolutionsWatch.com Check out the latest solutions from Dell Video Surveillance Solutions by Dell EMC OEM at IFSEC International, 20-22 June 2017, London ExCeL. You can find them on stand G250. Get your free badge now. Visit Europe s leading security event in June 2017 Visit IFSEC International for exclusive access to every security product on the market, live product demonstrations and networking with thousands of security professionals. From access control and video surveillance to smart buildings, cyber, border control and so much more.

It is the perfect way to keep up to date, protect your business and enhance your career in the security industry.

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Applying deep learning to cyber security: Q&A with Deep Instinct CEO Guy Caspi

Applying Deep Learning To Cyber Security: Q&A With Deep Instinct CEO Guy Caspi

Deep Instinct is the first company to apply deep learning to cyber security. Guy Caspi, the Israel-founded company s CEO, spoke to SecuritySolutionsWatch.com about the complexities of deep learning and how Deep Instinct spotted a gap in the ballooning market for combating cyber security threats. This interview was originally published on SecuritySolutionsWatch.com.

SecuritySolutionsWatch.com: Before discussing today s cyber security threat environment and Deep Instinct solutions in greater detail, please tell us about your background and company history? Guy Caspi: I ve utilised my advanced degrees in Mathematics, Machine Learning and Business to apply mathematics and machine learning in a technology elite unit of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF), as well as in financial institutions and intelligence organizations around the world. Over the past two decades, I ve led some of the largest government cyber and big data projects in Israel and other countries. Founded in 2014, and out of stealth mode since November 2015, Deep Instinct is the first company to apply deep learning to cyber security. With offices in Tel Aviv, Israel and in North America, we now have 65 employees. Our company has a winning combination of people who have the academic knowledge and credentials, paired with unique experiences in cyber security gained through years in the intelligence and elite units that focused on cyber- attacks. We adopt the mindset of hackers in order to be prepared for all vulnerabilities. In addition, Deep Instinct s dedicated deep learning research group is headed by one of the leading researchers in the field of computational intelligence. Moreover, the company has a highly-experienced management team that leverages its cyber security and academic backgrounds to carry out a successful product that offers an effective solution to address a critical need in the industry.

SecuritySolutionsWatch.com: Your site claims that Deep Instinct is The first company to apply deep learning to cyber security . Please give us an overview of how Deep Instinct works. GC: Deep Instinct s core technology is deep learning, which is an advanced branch of artificial intelligence (AI). Deep learning is inspired by the brain s ability to learn: once a brain learns to identify an object, its identification becomes second nature. Similarly, as Deep Instinct s artificial brain learns to detect any type of cyber threat, its prediction capabilities become instinctive. Deep learning has exhibited groundbreaking results when applied to computer vision, speech, and text understanding and we are the first company to apply it to the cyber security domain. In cyber security, there a big need for solutions that can protect against brand new (zero-day) threats in real-time a critical issue that causes great vulnerabilities to almost every business. Deep learning is complex and its application has a very high barrier entry because the neural networks are comprised of tens of hundreds of layers and the mathematics required to create such layers is extremely difficult. Even once this hurdle is passed, the implementation of running massive data sets using GPUs (Graphic User Interface) is not an easy feat.

Moreover, creating a deep learning-based technology that can run as an on-device client requires great expertise that raises the bar even higher. The few companies that have demonstrated these capabilities have mostly been acquired by giants, such as Google, Facebook and Salesforce. Furthermore, Deep Instinct does not use open source deep learning libraries but instead, has created its own. SecuritySolutionsWatch.com: What are the major benefits with respect to detection, prevention, accuracy, ease of deployment and other features. Guy Caspi: Deep Instinct offers a unique solution of prevention, which includes blocking malware before it is activated and can cause harm. Many new solutions on the market can only offer detection and prevention once the business has been infected, but we can detect and prevent before any damage occurs. By way of analogy, if a business were a person and the malicious attack were poison, other cyber security vendors need the person to first touch the poisonous object to then they can act and prevent the poison from spreading throughout the body. From Deep Instinct s perspective, we can tell the person not to touch the poisonous object in the first place because we immediately identified it as harmful. Moreover, Deep Instinct focuses on unknown threats and APT (Advanced Persistent Threat) attacks whether they are in a file-less manner or already existing in the system.

Instead of waiting for the next unexpected attack, the next unknown attack is identified and blocked in real-time before any harm can occur. The ability to offer immediate prevention extends beyond a network or Internet connection by covering the device even when it is not connected to them. Furthermore, our detection rates are substantially higher that existing solutions on the market. This unprecedented accuracy in predicting unknown cyber threats is enabled by the application of proprietary deep learning algorithms. Deep learning s capabilities of identifying malware from any data source results in comprehensive protection on any device, platform, and operating system, filling in gaps by providing complete solutions. Finally, deployment is fast and seamless and the solution s operations do not affect the user experience. Click here to read the full interview on SecuritySolutionsWatch.com Download: The Video Surveillance Report 2016 This exclusive report covers the security needs of surveillance systems as shaped by the physical environment including: What do security professionals think about plug-and-play systems Challenges like low-light conditions or large spaces and the threats posed in various sectors Which cutting-edge features such as mobile access, PTZ smart controls or 4K resolution are most important to security professionals What are the most important factors driving upgrades and would end users consider an upgrade to HD analogue Download the full report here.

The 5 most-read articles of 2016 aimed at installers and integrators of security and fire systems

The 5 Most-read Articles Of 2016 Aimed At Installers And Integrators Of Security And Fire Systems

Below are the news stories, features and how-to guides aimed at installers and integrators of fire and security products that top our most-read rankings for 2016. With the Home Automation House debuting at IFSEC this year and the connected home dominating CES 2016, IFSEC Global expanded considerably its coverage of this topic this year. The presence in our top five of three stories on home automation, an increasingly popular alternative revenue stream for installers of commercial security installations, suggests this was wise.

Number four on the list in particular shows just how strong the appetite is among installers for diversifying into this field. Elsewhere in the top five is a debate about the role of the installer. This also very much reflects the zeitgeist with the rise of the internet of things, end-to-end solutions and remote maintenance, as well as he ongoing migration to IP driving fundamental changes in the nature of security installation and maintenance today.

5. Debate: installer or engineer? how the security installer s role is changing We asked a number of security professionals for their views on the changing nature of security installations and the implications for how the trade defines itself. Two self-described engineers (as opposed to installers), a former SSAIB inspector and the MD of CSL DualCom also considered how the modern installer/engineer (delete as preferred) needs to adapt to an increasingly IT-driven industry. Shared 136 times on LinkedIn (at the time of writing) it was very much a debate that readers wanted their peers to see too.

4.

92% of security installers/integrators see home automation as a future revenue generator An overwhelming majority of security installers and integrators told IFSEC Global that they saw home automation as a potential growth area. A survey of hundreds of your peers suggested that the smart home was seen as a prime opportunity for diversification. Insights like this really vindicated the inclusion for the first time of a Home Automation House at IFSEC International (check out the interview below with Merit LILIN in said mock smart home). We also polled installers on which home automation technologies they would be particularly interested in/actively selling and installing. embedded content 3.

Recruitment crisis in fire and security: there s no new faces entering the industry It s arguably the most pressing problem in the fire and security sector and one that afflicts UK engineering as a whole. The Fire Industry Association (FIA) penned this piece highlighting the dearth of qualified engineers, including comments from Brett Ennals, a recruitment consultant for Cento, which specialises in fire and security recruitment. Echoing concerns expressed by many owners of installation firms at the SSAIB/BT Redcare Installer Forum in May, Ennals said: A lot of people have disappeared from the fire industry or they ve retired, and there s been no new blood, no new faces coming into the industry.

2. Loxone smart home Q&A: controlling lights with your phone isn t smart In September we interviewed Loxone s UK managing director, Philipp Schuster, about barriers to mass adoption, the growth curve in various countries and the benefits and challenges of entering the market for commercial security installers. It was a fascinating interview that also touched on the very definition of smart, which Philipp felt was overused and should be defined more narrowly than simply being able to operate lights from your smartphone. Founded in Austria in 2009, Loxone sells smart home systems to homeowners and housing developers predominantly across mainland Europe, though it also has a presence in the US.

1. Smart-home innovations on show at CES 2016 The enormous global appeal of CES, the consumer electronics show, no doubt propelled this article to the top of the pile. It s also certain based on our research that the IFSEC Global audience is hungry for information on the latest innovations and trends anything to get an edge on the competition. Among the products on show at CES 2016 was Samsung s intelligent Family Hub refrigerator, a spherical, rolling camera (see image below) and a wireless smart home solution from Tyco. Watch out for an even greater volume of coverage for CES 2017. We also have big plans for covering the growing commercial opportunities in the borders security and critical national infrastructure markets as IFSEC International gears up to launch Borders & Infrastructure for its 2017 edition.

In the meantime, have a great Christmas and New Year Download: The Video Surveillance Report 2016 This exclusive report covers the security needs of surveillance systems as shaped by the physical environment including: What do security professionals think about plug-and-play systems Challenges like low-light conditions or large spaces and the threats posed in various sectors Which cutting-edge features such as mobile access, PTZ smart controls or 4K resolution are most important to security professionals What are the most important factors driving upgrades and would end users consider an upgrade to HD analogue Download the full report here.

BAFE CEO highlights fire monitoring deficiencies at CSL Insurers Forum

Video In the video below BAFE CEO Stephen Adams offers his thoughts on the state of UK fire monitoring, expressing concerns about growing fire losses and responses to incidents at HMOs, care homes and empty buildings. In the interview, which was shown at the latest CSL Insurers Forum, Adams covered these areas: How he would compare fire monitoring to security monitoring How a drop in buildings monitored for fire activations has affected auto deployment How better fire monitoring could help responses when a building is empty What industry and insurers can do to improve fire installations and monitoring embedded content CSL s 10th Annual Insurers Forum in association with Vodafone enjoyed a record attendance of more than 60 senior insurers and fire and security consultants from leading companies at IFSEC International s HQ in Blackfriars, central London. Expert speakers discussed cyber security, home automation, M2M/IoT solutions and other industry trends.

Speakers included: Jason Girardier of Control4 discussed smart home automation and how it can help compliance of insured clients. Stephen Ridley of Hiscox (Aston Scott partnership) spoke about the need for greater awareness of cyber threats and offered ways for businesses to reduce their risks Entrepreneur Simon Gordon outlined the purpose of innovative CCTV-image-sharing resource Facewatch which he pioneered how it reduces crime and what it means for insurers Chantel Smith of Inner Range Europe presented their latest product including the standards it complies with, cyber threats and the ideology of a cloud-based alarm system Ray Kay of Vodafone discussed their investment in UK infrastructure, Vodafone s ongoing partnership with CSL and the importance of wireless technology Simon Banks of CSL focused on the value of partnerships within the security industry, investing in innovation, progressive trends and bridging the skills gap CSL is shortly publishing a booklet with more information about the Insurers Forum. To request your copy please click here . Free download covering legal requirements for responsible persons under the FSO, courtesy of the IOSH, BIFM and USHA approved UK provider of health, safety and environmental information. Key features: A full breakdown of the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 The key actions when dealing with fire precautions & protection A complete guide to maintaining procedures and requirements within your organisation.

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LA hospital ransomware payout shows astronomical cost of neglecting cyber threat

LA Hospital Ransomware Payout Shows Astronomical Cost Of Neglecting Cyber Threat

Interest in cyber security has rocketed in the last few years amid a torrent of hacks of major companies and government systems. From small businesses to the biggest corporate brands, no one is safe it seems, although the last few years have seen hospitals become a favourite target for hackers. This year a hospital s systems were even taken hostage by ransomware.

This is something we expected to see based on attacks on financial systems, Mike Ahmadi, global director of critical systems security for the Synopsys Software Integrity Group, told me. The reality is people don t just walk into banks anymore to rob them; they d rather just do it the comfort of their home whilst eating Cheetos. Ahmadi , a member of the US Department of Homeland Security Industrial Control Systems Joint Working Group and part of the advisory board for the US Secret Service Electronic Crimes Task Force, says one thing is for sure when it comes to cyber security trends: We re going to start to see a lot more malicious activity . One reasons why t s so easy to break into a system today is the power of the computer is so insane that passwords aren t even a challenge Ahmadi has been in the industry for a few years. He started in the medical industry and has since worked in industrial control systems, the automotive industry and recently started working with the International Atomic Energy Administration (IAEA), helping them figure out cyber security issues for nuclear facilities. One thing that has struck him during his career is a growth in awareness of the discipline. When I started working in cyber security in 2007 full-time and people asked what I did, he recalls, I would say cyber security and they didn t have a clue what that meant. Today when I say I work in cyber security, everyone knows what I m talking about. Additional opportunities As traditional crime rates continue to fall across the Western World (in contrast, it seems to the fear of crime), cybercrime seems to be heading in the other direction, while the internet of things is multiplying the vectors of possible attack.

The continued growth of technology and continued increase of power and computational power is going to create additional opportunities for hackers to break into systems. So why do the criminals seem to have the upper hand in what used to be called cyberspace, even as some traditional crimes, like burglary or armed robbery, are much less practical and worthwhile than they used to be? One of the main reasons it s so easy to break into a system today is the power of the computer is so insane that passwords aren t even a challenge, says Ahmadi. Nevertheless, growing awareness does not necessarily equate to taking the problem seriously. The software industry are really pushing back on any attempts to regulate them against cyber security issues, explains Ahmadi. If governments don t start mandating some sort of real responsibility for software companies, where many of the serious issues actually lie, I believe we may be facing a black-swan event. He believes we are getting closer to such a black-swan event a term popularised by Nicholas Nassim Taleb that means an event that is low probability, high impact and extremely difficult to predict. There will be at least one very big event that will be devastating. As much as I hope this doesn t happen, all the data seems to be pointing in that direction .

We ve done tests at some places where we ve seen you can take down an entire network of infusion pumps by just sending a couple of bad packets to the network. In early 2015, an LA hospital s entire internal computer system went down for more than a week by ransomware, which encrypted patient records and set the ransom for unlocking them at 9,000 bitcoins (almost $3.7m). It meant that the hospital was unable to access patient s records, having to revert to paper registrations and medical records and sending A&E patients to different hospitals as emergency rooms were unable to function properly. Though the systems affected were not actual medical devices, Ahmadi believes hackers were capable of doing so. We ve done tests at some places where we ve seen you can take down an entire network of infusion pumps by just sending a couple of bad packets to the network. Indicators Drawing an analogy with society s response to environmental crises, he says: We all knew pollution was getting bad, we knew about it for a long time, but by the time we started to do something on a global basis, it had grown to be huge problem. He continues: The thing that is interesting about black-swan events is that they re usually preceded by a bunch of indicators that something like this is coming we ve seen what s happening with security but the amount of action that people in the government are taking to solve the problem is nowhere near how bad the problems are getting . Ahmadi believes this is not entirely a technological problem; rather it s more of a policy and people problem. People don t want to spend the time or money, or make the change.

Unfortunately, it takes a major incident for real action to be taken. Organisations tend to be reactive rather than proactive. I was working with a major medical device manufacturer when their insulin pumps were hacked and because they faced such a huge PR issue and backlash about what happened, they put a lot of time, effort and money into fixing their problem and have now got to a point where there systems are really solid. Unfornately, the risk of anything happening in a single instance is so low it breeds complacency, even if the chances of things happening across thousands of instances is actually very high. Because we haven t had a black swan event yet, people always look at the numbers and risks and it looks like a fairly safe risk for them to take. They look at it and think: what are the odds of it happening? If you look at the numbers, the risk can be construed as being small.

I understand they re playing the odds, but if it happens, the consequences could be really huge.

Download: The Video Surveillance Report 2016 This exclusive report covers the security needs of surveillance systems as shaped by the physical environment including: What do security professionals think about plug-and-play systems Challenges like low-light conditions or large spaces and the threats posed in various sectors Which cutting-edge features such as mobile access, PTZ smart controls or 4K resolution are most important to security professionals What are the most important factors driving upgrades and would end users consider an upgrade to HD analogue Download the full report here.

My life as an apprentice security installer: Padraig Lennon, NM Fire & Security

My Life As An Apprentice Security Installer: Padraig Lennon, NM Fire & Security

Apprentice security installer Padraig Lennon won his heat at IFSEC International 2015 s Engineers of Tomorrow competition. Lennon, who went on to claim third place when the winners were announced at the Fire and Security Awards, works for County Down-based firm NM Fire & Security. Operating throughout Northern Ireland, NM Fire & Security is an NSI-accredited installer of CCTV, access control, intruder alarms, fire alarms and automatic gates.

Padraig kindly answered our questions about the Engineers of Tomorrow competition, about his role as a trainee installer of security systems and his career plans. IFSEC Global: How is your apprenticeship going? Is it an effective way to get into the security industry in your experience and why? Padraig Lennon: My apprenticeship is going very well. It is a good way to get into the security industry because you are getting the hands-on experience and getting the academic side, getting to learn the different standards, then putting these to good use when working on site. IG: What does your role at the company include? What kind of systems are you installing etc? PL: At the minute I m a junior engineer. Every day there is something different.

I m getting to work in teams and also on my own. My work varies between install, maintenance and fault calls. I work with a variety of different panels, day in day out, from the likes of Galaxy, Risco and Pyronix. Throughout my apprenticeship my company has let me work as a multi-disciplined engineer, which has given me the chance to work with intruder alarms, CCTV, access control, fire alarms and gate automation. This has been a major help in my progression throughout my apprenticeship. IG: How do you feel you personally benefitted from the Engineers of Tomorrow competition (could be in terms of confidence, career, skills etc)? PL: The Engineers of Tomorrow competition benefitted me in terms of gaining experience at such a high level show as IFSEC. It was like a real-life scenario, so this has helped me in my day-to-day job on site, going through specifications and making sure things are going to be installed in accordance to the correct standards. It has given me the communication skills also to cooperate with different people when on site and helped me in the early stages of my career.

Jonathan-English, H&J Martin (left) and Padraig Lennon, NM Fire & Security took third place overall in the Engineers of Tomorrow competition IG: What advice would you give to entrants for the 2017 competition? PL: I would tell them to control any nerves they may have, take the whole experience on board and enjoy such a major event in the security industry. Take in all the information provided to you and just do your best. Whatever you do, the Engineers of Tomorrow competition will definitely benefit you in your apprenticeship or your path to becoming a qualified engineer. IG: Where do you see your career in the security industry taking you in five years time? PL: In five years time I would like to see myself as a senior engineer, constantly trying to better myself by attending different training courses, keeping myself up to date with the forever-evolving security industry. Download: The Video Surveillance Report 2016 This exclusive report covers the security needs of surveillance systems as shaped by the physical environment including: What do security professionals think about plug-and-play systems Challenges like low-light conditions or large spaces and the threats posed in various sectors Which cutting-edge features such as mobile access, PTZ smart controls or 4K resolution are most important to security professionals What are the most important factors driving upgrades and would end users consider an upgrade to HD analogue Download the full report here.

“60% of US enterprise-level organisations lack encryption strategies”: Q&A with Extenua CEO Steve Visconti

“60% Of US Enterprise-level Organisations Lack Encryption Strategies”: Q&A With Extenua CEO Steve Visconti

Steve Visconti, president and CEO at US-based cloud security provider Extenua, talks cyber security in our latest Q&A snapshot from the US market. Originally published on SecuritySolutionsWatch.com, this interview covers the company s Cloud2Drive and SilverSHield solutions, as well as its role in IoT, mobile access and BYOD. SecuritySolutionsWatch.com: Yahoo, DropBox, LinkedIn the daily headlines unfortunately remind us just how vulnerable we are in today constant threat environment and the bad guys come in many forms: foreign governments, sophisticated hacker groups, and insiders among others.

What is your perspective, Steve, regarding the unique value proposition that Extenua brings to the table in today s IoT, mobility and BYOD environment? Steve Visconti: Cyber attacks have risen into the many millions of attacks per year, yet security continues to be perfunctory to the organization s overall data strategy. It is astonishing to me that some analysts estimate that 60% of U.S. enterprise organization DO NOT have encryption strategies applied across their organization. Hackers and their tools are very sophisticated including some with automation and its coming from many fronts you just listed. This is precisely why an organization or enterprise must have the most secure and hardened environments possible. Hackers and bad actors will eventually probe and eventually move on to the easier targets. Don t be that easy target when tools like Cloud2Drive are so easy to implement and non-disruptive. Cyberattacks have risen into the many millions of attacks per year, yet security continues to be perfunctory to the organizations overall data strategy.

It is astonishing to me that some analysts estimate that 60% of U.S. enterprise organization DO NOT have encryption strategies applied across their organization. Hackers and their tools are very sophisticated including some with automation and its coming from many fronts you just listed. This is precisely why an organization or enterprise must have the most secure and hardened environments possible. Hackers and bad actors will eventually probe and eventually move on to the easier targets. Don t be that easy target when tools like Cloud2Drive are so easy to implement and non-disruptive. Click here for the complete interview with Steve Visconti on SecuritySolutionsWatch.

Download: The Video Surveillance Report 2016 This exclusive report covers the security needs of surveillance systems as shaped by the physical environment including: What do security professionals think about plug-and-play systems Challenges like low-light conditions or large spaces and the threats posed in various sectors Which cutting-edge features such as mobile access, PTZ smart controls or 4K resolution are most important to security professionals What are the most important factors driving upgrades and would end users consider an upgrade to HD analogue Download the full report here.

BIM, Brexit and the ongoing fight for harmonisation: Q&A with Euralarm president Enzo Peduzzi

BIM, Brexit And The Ongoing Fight For Harmonisation: Q&A With Euralarm President Enzo Peduzzi

IFSEC Global speaks to Enzo Peduzzi about Euralarm s manifesto for change, with standards harmonisation the key to driving innovation, exports and customer satisfaction across Europe. The pan-European body s president also reflects on the impact of Brexit and two technological trends that are shaping the industry. IFSEC Global: What are Euralarm s priorities right now?

Enzo Peduzzi: Our priorities are outlined in our Manifesto for a Safer and more Secure Europe, which we published last year. It translates our internal strategy into actions and activities for our stakeholders, the European Commission or CEN-CENELEC. It outlines what we want to achieve in the next 2-3 years: as a European trade association we need to have a look at the development of our business in the long term. One of our top priorities right now is on an impact assessment the European Commission has recently put out on their proposals for a pan-European certification of security products. Because testing is usually done sequentially, pan-European certification would speed up the availability on the market of new, technologically innovative products In the strategic paper Security industrial policy Action plan for an innovative and competitive security industry , the European Commission called for a harmonisation in the certification of security products as a means to reach a pan-European market for the security industry and remove the fragmentation caused by the different types of voluntary national marks, with multiple tests of products. It takes some time it is a political process but the enquiry is out. Euralarm has responded to the enquiry and hopefully, at the beginning of 2017, we will see a legislative proposal, from the Commission to the European parliament, which will help the European security industry to be more competitive on the global market. Congratulated by outgoing president Marc Chabaud (right), Enzo Peduzzi is appointed Euralarm president in May 2015 IG: What benefits will the pan-European certification have? EP: There is a cost benefit as we do not have to repeat testing in different countries.

But the biggest benefit is the reduction in the time it takes to commercially roll out these products. Because the testing is usually done sequentially you do it one country, then start the next country so this would speed up the availability on the market of new, technologically innovative products. IG: Why don t manufacturers test products simultaneously in different jurisdictions to accelerate things? EP: Because the risk is high. If something happens in one country then you need to stop the testing in the next country. It is sequential for practical reasons. This will be the first step in the harmonisation of the security market. IG Is it frustrating that regulatory changes like this, which are clearly beneficial for both the industry and consumers, take so long to achieve? EP: It is a political process.

It is important for the industry and consumers, but if a crisis like the immigration issue comes to Europe, then for the European Commission and parliament it is not first priority any more, so we must be realistic. We have seen especially in our field of fire-safety and security that the standardisation process is quite difficult and cumbersome IG: Have you met much resistance from certain national bodies who are protective of their domestic market? EP: Not everybody has understood the importance of a truly European market yet. If the European security industry, especially the medium-sized manufacturer, which often have innovative products, want to be successful in the global marketplace, a strong pan-European home market is essential. So this will really help countries like the United Kingdom, Italy or Spain, which have a lot of small but innovative product manufacturers. We will have more technologically innovative products on the market, which helps the customer at the end. IG: What are your organisation s biggest achievements in recent years? EP: The first step is the Pan-European standard for the certification of service providers, which has just been voted through. There was a lot of work involved from Euralarm Members.

EN-Standard 16763 will really help service providers access a pan-European market. An other point is the standardisation process in Europe. Here we have seen especially in our field of fire-safety and security that the standardisation process is quite difficult and cumbersome. In 2014 we published a briefing document in which we highlighted a couple of issues in the standardisaton framework itself. This document stirred up quite a bit of powder in CEN-CENELEC and the national standardisation bodies, because we really were calling for action. This paper helped Euralarm to get in close contact with CCMC (CEN-CENELEC Management Centre) and we are now discussing on a regular basis the issues and find step-by step solutions to the most pressing issues. In parallel, the European Commission s recent Joint Standardisation Initiative , the JIS, has taken up these issues and started discussing them on a European level, so we are quite happy that we were not so wrong with our assessment. The JIS initiative should progress quickly. By the end of the year, apparently, the EC wants to table its joint proposals with the industry, but we will see.

We are cooperating and hope the timing can be kept. Standards have a hard time keeping up with technology change and that is why we asked for a speeding up of the standardisation process in Europe IG: Is Brexit having much of an impact on what you do at Euralarm? EP: At the moment, no. We are in close contact with our British members, the FIA and BSIA. They are very active and doing a good job in the United Kingdom, but are also active in Europe with Euralarm. We have assessed the situation together and, at least for the next 1-2 years, we do not foresee big changes . We have to see how Brexit negotiations progress, but if the United Kingdom s industry wants to export in Europe after that, then they have to comply with European standards and regulations. The standards work with CEN-CENELEC is not related to the EU. It includes countries not in the EU like Turkey, Norway, Switzerland.

For the United Kingdom to keep on working on European standardisation, it will probably require the change of some wording in the mandate for CEN-CENELEC, but not a major transformation. IG: How hard is it ensuring that standards keep pace with rapidly evolving technology? EP: Standards have a hard time keeping up with technology change. And that is why we asked for a speeding up of the standardisation process in Europe. We have seen two major technological changes. One is BIM building information modelling which has different level of maturity in different counties. The United Kingdom is one of the most advanced, while Germany for example is a bit further behind. BIM really has the potential to change the building industry of which our industry is part of it. We really need to keep up with that.

The other change is the internet of things, where everything is communicating. What happens with a small installer who installs a security control panel in my apartment, but the panel is not a piece of hardware anymore but software in the cloud ? We held a symposium on those topics last year, together with our general assembly in Lisbon. We had a good discussion with experts and our members. We will continue to monitor this subject, oversee the influences for standardisation and give our members suggestions and help over how they might prepare in future. IG: Anything else? EP: Our Manifesto for a Safer and more Secure Europe also covers qualifications and education in our industry. This is not our first priority, but we are aware we need to make an effort to educate people in the industry. Because everybody is competing for the talent and we need to offer young people interesting career paths in our industry.

We have started some concrete actions, but it will take time to find the right positions, because on a European level, education is very fragmented and complicated. It is different from country to country and city to city, but we need to get a grip on it and come up with some interesting ideas for the future. Free download covering legal requirements for responsible persons under the FSO, courtesy of the IOSH, BIFM and USHA approved UK provider of health, safety and environmental information.

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Helium molecules and quantum physics: the future of surveillance storage, according to Seagate

Helium Molecules And Quantum Physics: The Future Of Surveillance Storage, According To Seagate

Unable to offer visual demonstrations, CCTV storage might seem prosaic and unglamorous compared to security hardware like 4K or thermal cameras or video analytics software. And yet, there s a strong argument that some of the industry s most exciting innovations are happening in this field. Given the ever-growing storage needs of modern CCTV systems, it s a case of needs must.

Veracity CEO Alastair McLeod recently pitched COLDSTORE, the company s sequential data storage system, to IFSEC Global readers. Now we bring you an equally fascinating Q&A with another giant of the industry, Seagate. Andrew Palmer, UK surveillance manager at the American data storage company, talks to IFSEC Global about the company s latest products, working with installers, the use of helium molecules to cram more data into the same drive, and even how quantum physics is now informing the innovation process. Seagate Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD 8TB.jpg IFSEC Global: Just to kick off, Andrew, have you got any new products out at the moment? Andrew Palmer: Since last year we ve launched the 8 terabyte version of our surveillance hard drive, which is the world s biggest surveillance hard drive that can be used in a RAID system. IG: What is RAID? AP: Very simply, rather than storing all the data in one location, it s a box that stores bits of data across five disks. So if one disk drive fails you have backup somewhere else. That ties nicely into our data integrity story.

Our drives are RAID-ready the only surveillance drives that are The drives are based on an enterprise-class platform, so it s the same drive that goes into Google. We can ensure the drive is robustly built for this highly intensive, enterprise environment. IG: Any other interesting products or services? With Rescue services, if the data goes wrong because of fire, flood, vandalism, accidental deletion we can get the data back around 96% of the time AP: Finally, we have Rescue Services, a value-added service you can add to the hard drive. You pay extra of course, but once you pay that one-off payment that s it. Rescue is all covered. What it means is that if the data goes wrong because of fire, flood, vandalism, accidental deletion we can get the data back around 96% of the time. That s good for an installer. It s something they can add to a maintenance contract, to sell as a service add a bit of value.

And differentiation when it s often hard to differentiate between one brand and another. embedded content IG: Any other help for installers and other partners? AP: We felt the traffic on Seagate s main website was very IT-biased. They weren t really answering the questions this physical security community was asking us. So we built SeagateSecurity.com, where we have all our data, our data books and sheets, lots of imagery and banners for websites the stuff you might need if you re in marketing. So whether you are specifying a system as a consultant or someone in marketing trying to sell something, you have all you need. Finally, we have lots of articles and features in there that you can deploy on your own website and promote your own SEO optimisation. In our 10 terabyte desktop and enterprise drives we are using helium inside a hermetically sealed box. Helium molecules are much smaller than air molecules, so less friction, less vibration IG: Higher resolutions and demand for data analytics means surveillance systems are incredibly storage needs AP: Here s the thing.

A camera has a lens. In one end goes light that converts to ones and zeros, which pump down the cable to an NVR or DVR, which lay it into the hard drive. Then on the other side you get some sort of video imagery on a screen with a control panel. That all relies on a hard drive. If a hard drive goes wrong for any reason, all the other stuff you ve invested in is redundant. So as an installer or integrator you ve failed the system. So we would say that although people might view the hard drive as a commodity item they can buy from eBay, you should put the same hard drive in that goes into a desktop PC. We would say the hard drive is the system. Then we come to data integrity, reliability, that sort of stuff.

That s what we re trying to educate the market to think about. As the industry progresses, we see a lot more uses for surveillance footage not just as security, but for this thing called big data. Although I don t think we re quite there yet, eventually they will start to make use of this stuff and add value to it. Of course another thing as well is that if you look at networked cameras sharing the same network as a phone system, a computer system, the enterprise planning system, the manufacturing system. Suddenly your customer is no longer the facility guy or security guy; it s the IT manager, who saying woah: this is my system, back up! So I think Seagate are well used to that environment. We re good partners to help with that conversation. Of course, what it does then is move the system from just a cost so I can just bid a pound lower to get the job to actually being an asset with a return. You can use that data, sell it on, broker it.

I think we re well placed to take advantage of that. IG: Is innovation particularly important in surveillance storage given the soaring rise in data demands? AP: The problem is the hard drive itself can only be a 3.5 inch disk platter. You can only get so many platters into a box that sticks into a standard size socket. So how do you cram more data on there? If you think about a laptop with 320GB, we re already selling 10 terabyte hard drives. We re already at the atomic level; data behaves differently. Quantum physics comes into it. Not to be too technical, but it changes behaviour.

So the innovation is that deep so we lay data onto a hard drive in many ways. In our 10 terabyte desktop and enterprise drives we are using helium inside a hermetically sealed box. Helium molecules are much smaller than air molecules, so less friction, less vibration. So you can move the platters closer together and therefore cram one more platter into the space. Because its thinner with less air resistance, it takes less power to run. IG: Can I just walk you back to a comment you made about quantum mechanics. There was something in the media recently about the prospect of a quantum computer that overturned the fundamental binary basis of computers A hard drive platter is very shiny, perfectly smooth on the top. On it are concentric grooves. On each groove, if I took a piece of paper, there are 1,200 grooves in that sort of space.

So you re talking extremely tiny tolerations. So think about manufacturing: you have this thing that flicks over spinning discs. That ticking noise you hear in the computer. That is an arm flying over the platter, reading and writing data to the platter. So it s got to go from zero to the place it will store data; it s got to settle and to start writing. And that groove is one 1200 th of that. That s the level of engineering we re at. That s why I say atomic level. And when you get down to the quantum level, atoms behave in ways that are unpredictable.

Download: The Video Surveillance Report 2016 This exclusive report covers the security needs of surveillance systems as shaped by the physical environment including: What do security professionals think about plug-and-play systems Challenges like low-light conditions or large spaces and the threats posed in various sectors Which cutting-edge features such as mobile access, PTZ smart controls or 4K resolution are most important to security professionals What are the most important factors driving upgrades and would end users consider an upgrade to HD analogue Download the full report here.