infrastructure

Genetec announces product line-up

IFSEC 2017 During IFSEC in June, Genetec will be exhibiting Security Center 5.6, with new HTML5 web client, as well as previewing access control-as-a-service and new applications for retail and law enforcement. Montreal-based Genetec, which provides open architecture security and public safety solutions, will be at stand F500 at IFSEC taking place at ExCeL in London from 20-22 June. On its stand the company will demonstrate and preview its latest technologies that help integrators as well as end-users protect, improve and implement security measures within their environments.

Genetec will demonstrate Security Center 5.6, the latest version of the company s unified, open architecture IP security platform. Visitors will also be able to learn about Genetec Retail Sense, an analytics application for retail marketing and operations, as well as Genetec Clearance, which is a collaborative case management offering for law enforcement and security professionals. In addition a wide range of supported video, access control, and storage hardware and software systems from the Genetec ecosystem of partners will also be demonstrated. Synergis Genetec plans to offer a preview of its upcoming Synergis access-control-as-a-service, which can minimise reliance on corporate IT, eliminating the need for servers on premises and other costly IT equipment. Connected to Microsoft Azure, the technology can be deployed quickly and readily and can also be scaled as companies grow, providing maximum security for customer data. Genetec will also sponsor a new, speaking series called Borders & Infrastructure Theatre, to address the specific needs for managing large-scale multi-stakeholder security issues, like border control, critical national infrastructure, law enforcement and transport security. Andrew Elvish, vice president of marketing at Genetec says: Visitors to our stand at IFSEC this year will see that despite the extraordinary technology on display, Genetec s focus remains squarely on protecting the everyday. This latest version of Security Center includes advanced authentication, authorisation and encryption standards plus a new HTML5 web client with an enhanced mapping interface, new access control and video device integrations, as well as the ability to use number plates as access control credentials with the new AutoVu SharpV camera. Genetec recently released the latest version of off-street parking enforcement software Free-Flow.

The company has also been confirmed as sponsor of the Borders & Infrastructure Expo, which makes its debut within IFSEC this year. Check out the latest solutions from Genetec at IFSEC International, 20-22 June 2017, London ExCeL. You can find Genetec on stand F500.

Get your free badge now. Visit Europe s only large-scale security event in 2017 Taking place in London, 20 22 June 2017, IFSEC International gives you exclusive hands-on access to over 10,000 security solutions, live product demonstrations, and networking with over 27,000 security professionals. Covering every aspect of security, from access control and video surveillance to smart buildings, cyber, border control and so much more.

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2000ft drone-busting invisible fence erected by Guernsey prison

Anti-drone tech Les Nicolles prison on Guernsey in the Channel Islands has become the first in the world to use an invisible shield to foil drones programmed to smuggle in drugs, weapons and mobile phones. The fence s technology works by jamming electronic transmissions that return the drone to its sender preventing its delivery of contraband. Sensors act as disruptors to jam the drone by blocking radio frequencies.

Sky Fence has been developed by Nottingham-based firm Drone Defence and Eclipse Digital Solutions with installation costs upwards of 100,000. Drone Defence founder and CEO Richard Gill said: It disrupts the control network between the flyer and the drone. The drone then activates return to home mode and it will then fly back to the position where it had signal with its flyer. Someone described it as the final piece in a prison s security puzzle. I think it could have a significant worldwide impact. Gill said the technology neither hacks nor damages the drones. The technology can combat the increasing number of unmanned aerial vehicles that are being dispatched to jails to drop off illicit goods that are fuelling growing violence and disorder among inmates. Les Nicolles prison is a mixed category jail with 139 inmates. Prison governor David Matthews said: This is the first time this technology has been used in any prison anywhere in the world.

I would like to see it adopted in other UK prisons because it has become a significant problem there. Drones can carry weapons, contraband, mobile phones and drugs. This is about prevention. The Drone Zone one again returns to IFSEC International in June for its 2017 edition. Brought to you in partnership with The UK Drone Show, the Drone Zone will feature demonstrations of drone and anti-drone technology from Yuneec, Dedrone, Hitachi and Magos. The Drone Zone will form part of Borders & Infrastructure Expo, a brand new show within IFSEC dedicated to the protection of borders and critical national infrastructure. Get your free badge for IFSEC 2017 now. Join other high-end security professionals at the launch of Borders & Infrastructure Expo In conjunction with Europe s most renowned security event , IFSEC International, B&I is addressing your critical needs for large scale security projects affecting national security, integrated systems, border protection and much more. You will have access to test the latest security innovations in; Physical & perimeter, Barriers & bollards, Command & control, Emergency response, Cyber solutions, Drones & UAVs, Transport security and much more.

Click here to register your place now to join us at London Excel on 20 22 June 2017.

BSIA responds to cash courier shooting in London

Walthamstow shooting The trade body representing the private security industry in the UK has issued the following statement relating to the recent shooting of a cash-in-transit courier in Walthamstow, north-east London. The cash-in-transit courier was injured from the shooting ambush. James Kelly, chief executive of the British Security Industry Association (BSIA) said in a statement: Every day, cash-in-transit couriers perform a vital public service, transporting cash around the country and supporting banks, retailers and businesses by facilitating millions of financial transactions across the UK.

However, in doing so, they place themselves at risk of extreme violence, as today s incident sadly reminds us. Kelly goes on to point out that the number of attacks on cash-in-transit couriers remains at an all-time low. There were 76 injuries to cash-in-transit crew members, police and the wider public in 2016. However, the risk of violence and injury remains a very real threat to couriers. This is something that the private security industry together with its partners in police and government is continually working to reduce through initiatives like SaferCash, which shares intelligence about attacks and suspicious incidents between couriers and the police, continued Kelly. Our thoughts are with the injured courier and his family who have made a very personal sacrifice for the sake of our nation s economic security and we wish him a full and speedy recovery. The BSIA is a longstanding and valued partner of, and exhibitor at, IFSEC International, Europe s biggest fire and security trade show taking place 20-22 June 2017, London ExCeL. Get your free badge now. Take your security knowledge to the next level at IFSEC International 2017 Experts from across all areas of the industry will attend to share their expertise on critical topics on 20 22 June 2017.

Choose from over 80 hours of seminars to attend across four theatres, the Panasonic Security Management Theatre, TDSI Tavcom Training Theatre, Smart Theatre, Genetec Borders & Infrastructure Theatre.

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GAO WEST NILE VIRUS OUTBREAK.

Lessons for Public Health …

Transcription

1 GAO United States General Accounting Office Report to Congressional Requesters September 2000 WEST NILE VIRUS OUTBREAK Lessons for Public Health Preparedness GAO/HEHS

Urban resilience: maintaining the flow of assets, information and people in megacities

Take a snapshot of a city on an ordinary day and you ll see people commuting from place to place, rubbish being collected, students attending class, electricity emerging at the flick of a switch and countless other activities, most invisible to even the most focused observer. In many ways, cities are all about the flow of assets, information and people. A lot of people.

Today, more than half of the world s population lives in an urban area. In a little over 30 years, this will rise to two thirds, and it s predicted that, as early 2030, our planet will have 41 megacities with well over 10 million inhabitants each. This is great news. After all, a successful city attracts businesses, fosters innovation and provides incredible opportunities for its citizens. But how do we construct and manage cities so that everything, and everyone, flows smoothly today and in the future? In short, how can we ensure that our cities will continue to succeed as they grow? After all, a city that works is a city you want to be in. A key indicator of success is a city s urban resilience. We know that the ability to get back to normal as quickly as possible following an incident, unplanned event or emergency is essential as it makes citizens feel safe and allows businesses to continue to thrive.

Gone are the days when urban safety was the sole responsibility of law enforcement And since cities are seen as hubs of commerce and leisure, heightened levels of crime or even the fear of crime can fundamentally undermine the quality of urban life for citizens. The challenge then is how to put systems and processes in place that keep our cities safe while allowing them to adapt and grow as populations increase and technology advances. How do we keep our cities resilient even as their make-up changes? Open communication and connection Increasingly, the resilience of cities depends on the open communication and connection between a wide variety of systems and organisations. Gone are the days when urban safety was the sole responsibility of law enforcement. Businesses, traffic control, public works, schools, transit authorities, hospital administrations and so on all have important roles to play and can add meaningful often vital input into any emergency response plan. For example, the earthquake and Tsunami that struck Japan in 2011 destroyed one of the country s main highways. Within six days of the disaster, as part of that country s emergency plan, it was completely repaired, including its road lane markings. This facilitated the movement of supplies and work crews into, and citizens out of, the affected area, thereby increasing their resilience.

Different agencies can end up working in silos, ultimately leading to breakdowns in communication While road markings might not be at the top of anyone s to-do list following a natural disaster, the Japanese government and other organisations were able to determine the best course of action required to address very real but not obvious problems through advanced communication and preparation. In many cities, however, and for a variety of reasons, we see stakeholders who are not collaborating with one another. Business leaders, city planners, municipal infrastructure leaders, fire departments and law enforcement can end up working in silos, ultimately leading to breakdowns in communication, missed opportunities and lapses in city security. This is felt most acutely during an emergency when silos turn into blind-spots and a lack of cooperation can create opportunities for criminal activity, making a city and its people more vulnerable. Bring stakeholders together Fortunately, we have also seen that, when we break down these silos and share information, great things can happen. As we ve seen in Detroit, a city can almost instantly lower its crime rate by connecting HD video from gas stations and convenience stores with law enforcement. This seemingly straightforward move has the added benefit of increasing public safety while helping local businesses thrive. As a result, a resilient city that embraces these new technologies, can yield stronger and safer communities where citizens want to reside and do business. Our task is to establish strong foundations that support and maintain the efficient flow of people, assets and ideas in our cities.

These foundations must allow our city and community stakeholders to communicate effectively both now and in the future. Because, when given the opportunity to share technology, resources and information, cities can significantly improve the way they meet challenges and solve problems making an ordinary everyday possible via extraordinary technologies and collaboration. Genetec is the official sponsor of Borders & Infastructure Expo, which debuts at IFSEC 2017 in June. Genetec are also exhibiting on stand F500 at the show, which takes place 20-22 June 2017, London ExCeL. Get your free badge now. Join other high-end security professionals at the launch of Borders & Infrastructure Expo In conjunction with Europe s most renowned security event , IFSEC International, B&I is addressing your critical needs for large scale security projects affecting national security, integrated systems, border protection and much more. You will have access to test the latest security innovations in; Physical & perimeter, Barriers & bollards, Command & control, Emergency response, Cyber solutions, Drones & UAVs, Transport security and much more.

Click here to register your place now to join us at London Excel on 20 22 June 2017.

Kitemark standard would be a progressive step towards strengthening IoT security

Symantec internet Security threat Report The recent Internet Security Threats Report from Symantec highlights that last year cyber attackers have been fishing for gold in all areas and frequently finding success, as seen by the sheer regularity of breach reports in 2016. While malicious emails and ransomware continued to wreak havoc on businesses and consumers alike, the study again highlighted new threats coming into the spotlight thanks to the increase in usage of connected devices. In an era where data is becoming the new currency, all personal and professional data needs to be properly protected especially with GDPR regulations fast approaching.

As more businesses take advantage of the benefits the internet of things (IoT) can bring to their business, they also need to utilise technologies available to them such as machine learning to help analyse and help detect and improve weaknesses in a network and spot abnormal activity when it occurs. We can expect various forms of attacks to continue to increase. There is no excuse not to be prepared. As we continue to see the exponential growth of connected devices, we will continue to see security issues that we hadn t even considered before, such as the Mirai botnet of 2016. Lessons will clearly be learned such as avoiding hard coding IP addresses, use of default password, while many of the protocols designed for smart connected devices will have their own potential flaws and vulnerabilities which organisations will have to tackle. Online Trust Alliance (OTA) To help make securing internet-connected devices easier for businesses, the Online Trust Alliance (OTA) has produced a framework in IoT security, offering guidance on how to secure embedded devices. This introduction of a kitemark standard for IoT devices is a progressive step towards ensuring safe practice is followed and that security of such devices against these types of hacks is stopped at source. In short, we can expect various forms of attacks to continue to increase. With this knowledge there is no excuse not to be prepared.

Cybercriminals are entrepreneurial, well-sourced and motivated and Symantec s report once again demonstrates that the threat of attack is a growing problem. Organisations and consumers need to be wary of attacks, as the damage could be far greater than just financial and reputational. Organisations must now realise that they can no longer afford for cybersecurity not to be their number one priority. Ensure a solid security strategy at Borders & Infrastructure Expo Join other high-end security professionals at the launch of Borders & Infrastructure Expo, in conjunction with Europe s most renowned security event, IFSEC International, addressing your critical needs for large-scale security projects. By attending, you ll access leading security providers showcasing the latest advancements in both physical and cyber solutions.

Click here to register your place now to join us at London Excel on 20 22 June 2017.

2.5 million annual hacks are just the tip of the iceberg

Cybersecurity The number of UK businesses attacked by cybercriminals last year is actually much higher than the 2.5 million disclosed in the Cyber Security Breaches Survey 2016, according to a leading cybersecurity expert. The survey, a collaboration between IPSOS Mori, University of Portsmouth and the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, found that hackers have attacked more than 2.5 million businesses in the last year. However, Martijn Verbree, partner in KPMG s cyber security practice, says: In reality this is likely to be just the tip of the iceberg.

The real number of organisations being attacked is likely much higher as most businesses do not bother to report such incidents or at worst, they do not know that they have even been breached. According to Verbree, attacks are getting more and more personal and sophisticated, with attackers using information they can find on social media to make emails personal, for example, by referring to names of bosses or other colleagues, or even writing emails that affect the recipient emotionally ( you owe us xxxx ) to induce them to click on links without thinking. It s unfortunate, but as a result we expect that the number of such successful attacks will increase in the coming year, especially amongst smaller and medium sized companies that do not have a lot of skills and expertise in cyber security. To be cyber ready businesses and their staff, should stop, think and stay safe before clicking on attachments in emails. If they are in any doubt that the email is a legitimate communication from someone then don t open the attachment, advises Verbree. Backing up data is important in case a firm is impacted by ransomware, as well as having in place an incident response process and even possibly cyber insurance. He also advises firms to sign up to government-backed cyber security certification schemes. Ensure a solid security strategy at Borders & Infrastructure Expo Join other high-end security professionals at the launch of Borders & Infrastructure Expo, in conjunction with Europe s most renowned security event, IFSEC International, addressing your critical needs for large-scale security projects. By attending, you ll access leading security providers showcasing the latest advancements in both physical and cyber solutions.

Click here to register your place now to join us at London Excel on 20 22 June 2017.

US regulator and healthcare sector fear medical device hacks

IoT The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and medical device makers are expecting more hacking attacks, according to an in-depth piece published by The Hill. Tens of millions of electronic health records have been compromised in recent years, with hospitals and health insurers hit by hackers. Now attention is turning to vulnerabilities in medical devices like pacemakers and insulin pumps that could make them susceptible to hacking.

The FDA is coordinating with other agencies on how to respond if a medical device hack were to occur. This is what we said to manufacturers; one should consider the environment a hostile environment, there are constant attempts at intrusion and they have to be hardened, said Suzanne Schwartz, associate director for science and strategic partnerships at the FDA s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Potentially fatal overdose In 2016, healthcare brand Johnson & Johnson told its customers that its insulin pumps had a security vulnerability that hackers could potentially use to access the device, which has a wireless controller, and cause a potentially fatal overdose of insulin. Wireless connection can be an easy access point for hackers. However, so far there have been no known cases of medical-device hacking causing patient harm, according to Zach Rothstein, associate vice president at the Advanced Medical Technology Association. Hackers can tap into a hospital, through an unsecured wireless printer, for example, and access the entire system, or take over a hospital s electronic records or lock them out of their website until a ransom is paid. In just the last few years we ve seen more than a hundred million health records of American citizens breached in a couple of well-publicised incidents, Terry Rice, vice president of IT risk management and chief information security officer at Merck & Company, told the Energy and Commerce Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee recently. Rice, who sits on the Healthcare Industry Cybsecurity Task Force, believes the cybersecurity problem is significantly underreported in the healthcare industry. Reputational harm He also said organisations are unlikely to report security incidents if not required to do so because of the potential reputational harm that might occur.

The FDA says in its premarket guidance that it recognises that medical device security is a shared responsibility between stakeholders, including healthcare facilities, patients, providers, and manufacturers of medical devices. FDA guidance on medical devices also says manufacturers have an obligation to consider the cybersecurity of their devices during design and throughout the operating life of that device, potentially providing the basis for someone to allege that manufacturers have a duty to do more to secure devices. Information sharing can protect against hacking attempts. Healthcare providers, manufacturers and others are part of a group that update their defences against common threats, while congress and the industry both promote healthcare information sharing, to get it up to par with other industries, such as financial services. The problem is aggravated by the very low level of cybersecurity at hospitals in general lack of segregation and access rights, missing security patches and updates, missing or weak encryption, insecure authentication, default or weak passwords. Ilia Kolochenko, CEO, High-Tech Bridge Both the FDA and industry are hiring cybersecurity experts, with many companies also using coordinated disclosure where researchers or white hat hackers can report vulnerabilities directly to the company instead of making them public. The medical device industry, I would say in the last two-and-a-half years or so, has gone from general understanding of the issue, general participation to extreme awareness and participation in cybersecurity efforts, Rothstein said. Ilia Kolochenko, CEO of web security company High-Tech Bridge says that ransomware, has not historically target hospitals and insurance firms, though he concedes that targeted attacks against healthcare institutions may increase in the near future as the victims usually have no other choice but to pay without a delay. The vulnerability of connected medical devices to hacking depends on various factors.

Such devices are usually made without any precaution in terms of information security but the hacker usually has to be near the device or at least inside of the hospital wireless network. However Kolochenko agrees these types of hacks could increase. He adds: The problem is aggravated by the very low level of cybersecurity at hospitals in general lack of segregation and access rights, missing security patches and updates, missing or weak encryption, insecure authentication, default or weak passwords. Connected medical devices should be strictly and severely regulated by governments, and their manufacturers should bear the liability for any negligence or carelessness during the manufacturing process otherwise medicine will become an extremely dangerous activity within the next decade. Ensure a solid security strategy at Borders & Infrastructure Expo Join other high-end security professionals at the launch of Borders & Infrastructure Expo, in conjunction with Europe s most renowned security event, IFSEC International, addressing your critical needs for large-scale security projects. By attending, you ll access leading security providers showcasing the latest advancements in both physical and cyber solutions. Click here to register your place now to join us at London Excel on 20 22 June 2017.

One in five UK firms hacked in 2016

Cybersecurity Large firms are most at risk from cybercrime, with British businesses lacking even the most basic security measures to keep confidential information secure, finds a survey by the British Chambers of Commerce (BCC). According to the survey of more than 1,200 businesses, one in five British businesses were hacked last year and only a quarter of businesses said they had security in place to guard against hacking. The findings from the survey have also discovered that it is larger companies, with at least 100 staff, that are more susceptible to cyber attacks.

Around 42% of large businesses reported cyber attacks, compared with 18% of small companies. High-profile attacks on company databases, have hit companies, including Yahoo and telecoms firm TalkTalk. Hackers into Yahoo s database had accessed a wealth of personal data, including email addresses, dates of birth and passwords and even encrypted or unencrypted security questions and answers from more than a billion user accounts in August 2013. In a Guardian article, Adam Marshall, BCC director-general, said: Cyber-attacks risk companies finances, confidence and reputation, with victims reporting not only monetary losses, but costs from disruption to their business and productivity. While firms of all sizes, from major corporations to one-man operations, fall prey to attacks, our evidence shows that large companies are more likely to experience them. Most businesses surveyed are reliant on IT providers to resolve issues after an attack, while banks and financial institutions as well as police and law enforcement agencies tend to have in-house expertise. The extension to data protection regulation coming into force in 2017 means firms will need to increase their responsibilities and requirements to protect personal data, or prepare to face penalties for not complying. TalkTalk had to pay a 400,000 fine in 2016 for security failings that led to it being hacked in 2015. The Information Commissioner s Office, which levied the fine, said the attack could have been prevented if TalkTalk had taken basic steps to protect customers information .

Marshall added: More guidance from government and police about where and how to report attacks would provide businesses with a clear path to follow in the event of a cybersecurity breach and increase clarity around the response options available to victims, which would help minimise the occurrence of cybercrime. Ensure a solid security strategy at Borders & Infrastructure Expo Join other high-end security professionals at the launch of Borders & Infrastructure Expo, in conjunction with Europe s most renowned security event, IFSEC International, addressing your critical needs for large-scale security projects. By attending, you ll access leading security providers showcasing the latest advancements in both physical and cyber solutions.

Click here to register your place now to join us at London Excel on 20 22 June 2017.

Businesses deploying drones must use certified operators, advises UAV training academy

Drone news Due to rising drone-related incidents and accidents, commercial organisations using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to perform tasks need to ensure they hire certified operators, according to UAVAir. UAVAir was prompted to issue the advice, after the Department for Transport, the Ministry of Defence and Sciencewise recently commissioned Kantar Public UK (formerly TNS BMRM), which provides research and consultancy to policy makers, to conduct a public dialogue on the current use of drones in the UK. The move is in response to growing number of reported drone-related incidents and accidents, such as the British Airways passenger jet that was hit by what was thought to be a UAV as it flew into Heathrow to land, in 2016.

S amus Kearns, chief instructor at UAVAir, which runs a Civil Aviation Authority (CAA)-approved training centre for drone operators, said: It is imperative that any business with a core ethos of reliability and responsibility understands the importance of hiring a fully certified drone operator to complete its drone-based missions. embedded content When undergoing training at UAVAir, pilots are tested for their cultural, theoretical and technical knowledge, to give them an in-depth understanding of how to operate a drone safely while respecting the laws of aviation. Failure to follow aviation rules can result in large fines and in some cases, legal action. In the UK, drones are governed by the CAA, and under its rules it is illegal for any pilot to operate a drone for commercial purposes without gaining certification from a CAA-approved drone training school. A safe, successful mission must be planned and executed thoroughly, understanding the individual complexities of each task. It is impossible to gain this experience and learn these skills without undergoing the training process prior to certification, Kearns added. As well as learning flight technique, pilots must prepare an operations manual in order to become a fully certified pilot. The manual includes information about each mission as well as the procedures to be followed to ensure a safe flight. More about UAVAir s Unmanned Aircraft Qualification can be found on the company s website.

The Drone Zone one again returns to IFSEC International in June for its 2017 edition. Brought to you in partnership with The UK Drone Show, the Drone Zone will feature demonstrations of drone and anti-drone technology from Yuneec, Dedrone, Hitachi and Magos. The Drone Zone will form part of Borders & Infrastructure Expo, a brand new show within IFSEC dedicated to the protection of borders and critical national infrastructure. Get your free badge for IFSEC 2017 now. Visit Europe s leading security event in June 2017 Visit IFSEC International for exclusive access to every security product on the market, live product demonstrations and networking with thousands of security professionals. From access control and video surveillance to smart buildings, cyber, border control and so much more. It is the perfect way to keep up to date, protect your business and enhance your career in the security industry.

Click here to register your place now to join us at London Excel on 20 22 June 2017.