Global

Airport security market set for years of strong growth amid perpetual terror threat

Market trends The airport security market is projected to grow 7% a year CAGR until 2024, reaching a value of $16 billion, according to a report by Global Market Insights. With the global terror threat likely to remain for years if not decades to come, demand for the latest innovations in security technology is burgeoning. Upgrades in customs screening technology, such as x-ray scanners, millimeter wave scanners or thermal cameras, are the most obvious investments.

Airports are also keen to maintain or even accelerate throughput of, and minimise disruption to, passengers even as they deploy systems that tighten security. embedded content One innovation designed to achieve both of these once contradictory goals is ThruVis by Digital Barriers. Fifty people were screened for weapons every three minutes during the recent British Summer Time event in Hyde Park thanks to the pioneering thermal-based camera. Hitherto manual processes are increasingly automated with the global market for smart airports growing at 10.7% CAGR, according to another report, by Grand View Research. Biometric passport authentication and contactless entryway checkpoints are two examples that enhance security, while remote check-ins, sensor equipment, e-gates, RFID baggage reconciliation systems improve operational efficiency. Airports are also keen to upgrade video surveillance systems to cover wider areas with fewer cameras, and to exploit higher resolutions and video analytics technology. Suspect Search by Qognify, for instance, can identify suspicious packages, track suspicious persons and reduce the frequency of false alarms and airport shutdowns that can cost airports tens of millions of dollars. The North American airport security market is expected to grow strongly as the US government prioritises homeland security, although Asia Pacific is the fastest growing region overall. The US Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is experimenting with scanning technology that provides 3D images of screened cargo.

Called ConneCT the scanners are being trialled at the Phoenix Sky Harbor and Logan International Airport. Large security brands are increasingly providing end-to-end, integrated solutions that span a number of security technologies. Izmir International Airport in Turkey, for instance, has recently entered into an agreement with Tyco Security Products for the provision of unified security solutions such as access control, location monitoring, and intrusion tracking.

We recently spoke to Simon Cook, sales engineering manager EMEA and APAC at Genetec, the unified security solution provider with a huge presence in the airport market. At last count, 85 of the world s largest airports use Genetec systems, and 70% of all airports in the Middle East one of our fastest growing markets are protected by Genetec Security Center systems, Cook told us. Related Topics Can I take a knife-shaped banana on the flight?

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IP CCTV: What does pixel density mean exactly?

IN DEPTH An IP surveillance system may be used to observe and protect people, objects and people s activity inside and outside the objects, traffic and vehicles, money handling in banks, or games in casino environment. All of these objects of interest may have different clarity when displayed on a workstation screen. The image clarity depends primarily on the camera used, the imaging sensor, its lens and the distance from the object.

There is one parameter in IP CCTV that expresses the image clarity in a simple way with just one parameter: pixel density. The pixel density is usually expressed in pixels per metre (Pix/m), at the object plane, although it can be expressed in pixels per foot. Pixel density in IP CCTV sense should not be confused with the display pixel density quoted by various LCD display manufacturers which defines the screen density, in pixels per inch (PPI). The advantage of expressing object clarity with its pixel density is that it combines the sensor size, pixel count, focal length and distance to the object in just one parameter . When using pixel density metrics all variables are included and makes it universally understandable what details you will get on an operator s workstation screen. When designing a system, or a tender for a system, one can request pixel density for a particular image quality. So, instead of asking for a 6 mm lens for your camera in a particular location, for example (which means nothing without knowing the camera sensor it is used on), it would be much more useful if a particular pixel density is defined for the view. This will then be used to calculate the required lens for the particular camera used and the distance from the object. This will guarantee the clarity of the image (assuming the lens is focused optimally and there is sufficient light, of course).

Pixel density can be used for any object that IP CCTV user might be interested in: face, licence plate, playing card, money and similar. Let us now explore how many pixels per metre are attributed to various objects. One of the most commonly referred pixel densities is for Face Identification. Face Identification in CCTV means sufficient clarity of the image so that one can positively identify who the person on the screen is. According to Australian Standards AS4806.2, for Face Identification in analogue CCTV, we require 100% person s height to fit on the monitor screen display. The details of 100% person s height on a screen have been tested many times and it s been verified that they are sufficient for such a person to be identified. We know that PAL signal is composed of 576 active TV lines, so, according to AS4806.2, a person s height would occupy all of the active lines to make it 100%. Head occupies around 15% of a person s height, which is equivalent to around 86 lines (576 x 0.15 = 86.4), which is the same when converted to pixels (assuming recording is made full TV frame mode, which is equal to two TV fields). If we agree that an average person height is 170 cm, the head would occupy around 25 cm of that.

The pixel density at the object, which is required to make a positive Face Identification according to AS 4806.2, can be calculated to be 86 pixels at 25 cm of head height. Since there are 4 times 25 cm in 1 m of height, this becomes 4 x 86 = 344 pix/m. So, one can say that with pixel density of 344 pix/m at the objects plane it should be possible to positively identify a face, according to AS4806.2. Face Identification as per AS4806.2 Some other standards may require different values, and one such (newer) standard is the IEC 62676-4, which defines 250 pix/m to be sufficient (i.e. suggests that with slightly lesser pixel density than the AS standards one should be able to identify a person). Clearly, this number is not fixed in concrete, and it will depend on the observing ability of the operator, as well as other parameters (lens quality, illumination, compression artefacts, etc ), but the key is to understand that such a pixel density can be calculated for any type of camera, irrespective if that is SD, HD, 4k or any other format. The next image quality down, as defined by the standards is for Face Recognition. The details of Face Recognition image should be sufficient to recognise the gender of a person, what he/she is wearing and possibly make an assertion of who that person might be, if picked from a bunch of people that have already been identified somewhere else (e.g. passport or drivers licence photo).

This is basically an image with half the pixel density to the face identification, which according to AS4806.2 should be around 172 pix/m, while IEC62676-4 suggests 125 pix/m. Similarly, pixel density can be defined for vehicle licence plates visual recognition (not software automatic LPR). In the AS 4806.2, this is defined as 5% characters height on a display screen, which is around 30 TV lines (pixels) (to be very accurate 576 x 0.05 = 28.8). If we assume that a typical Australian number plate has characters of around 90 mm in height, than this equates to 11 x 30 pixels = 330 pix/m. The number 11 is obtained from dividing 1000 mm (1 m) with 90 mm. One may say that for visual licence plates recognition similar pixel density is required as for face identification. Licence plate recognition as per AS4806.2 When money and playing cards are observed in banks or casinos, many practical tests have shown that at least 50 pixels are required across the notes or cards longer side in order to positively identify the values. Standard playing cards dimensions are B8 according to ISO216 standard, which is 62 mm x 88 mm. So, we need the 88 mm card length to be covered with at least 50 pixels for proper identification.

This means around 550 pix/m (1000 mm / 88 mm = 11 => 50 pix x 11 = 550 pix/m) should be sufficient for playing cards. We may require slightly better pixel density for identifying money, since notes size is typically larger than playing cards, so if one takes the Face Inspection pixels density of 1000 pix/m, it should attain pretty good identification, although as it can be seen from the real life example below, even 770 pix/m might be sufficient. Playing cards and money shown above with 770 pix/m As it can be concluded from the above examples, the pixel density can be defined for any object and any camera, large or small. The beauty of the pixel density parameter is, as said at the very beginning, that includes all parameters influencing the clarity of the observed objects. For this reason, ViDi Labs has developed the ViDiLabs iOS calc (search the iTunes App Store under ViDiLabs calc ), a unique tool for the surveillance industry, which can also be used in cinematography, photography and any other imaging application dealing with objects details. So the following table can be used as a rough guide for various pixel densities. Free Download: The key to mitigating cybersecurity risks Exploiting IoT technology without creating cybersecurity vulnerabilities is one of the defining challenges in today s security landscape.

This report will help you to see why third parties should adhere to secure by design principles and why the necessary convergence of IT and security departments demands a holistic approach .

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The value of cyber risk assessments and how to reinforce your soft underbelly: your employees

Headlines revealing the latest cyber-attack have cropped up with concerning regularity in 2017. It will therefore come as little surprise to learn that the latest institutions to be found wanting in the cybersecurity department are universities, as reported recently in The Times . Following a Freedom of Information request, the paper discovered that the number of attacks experienced by leading universities has almost doubled in the past two years, with advances in military and energy technology being particularly targeted.

The director of cybersecurity research at the University of Warwick was reported as saying that lax cybersecurity was a problem at many universities. Another security expert claimed this was due to their use of open networks, insufficient investment in both software and staff to monitor security, and the difficulty of managing a range of different networks. While universities are an obvious target for cyber-attacks (many of which appear to be sponsored by nation states) due to their rich seam of research data and inadequate defences, every business should be aware of the damage cybercriminals can inflict by disrupting their operations. The ransomware attack on a range of organisations (including the NHS) demonstrated this only too clearly earlier this year. Protecting your networks from cyber-attacks Cybercriminals are always looking for the chink in the armour so every business must take cybersecurity seriously to avoid becoming a victim. The first step is to carry out a risk assessment to establish what personal data and other confidential data the company holds and how it is used, transmitted and stored. Once you have identified any weak spots where cybercrime poses a particular risk, the next step is to implement security measures to protect your networks from cyber-attacks. Employees are a weak spot It is right to acknowledge that one of your major weak spots is likely to be your employees. You need to put clear procedures in place, encapsulated in a company policy, to deal with the risk of cybercrime.

And all staff should be trained on what steps they can/should take to prevent it. You can insist that any memory sticks, tablets or mobile phones used by employees outside the workplace must be scanned before using them on company network systems. Indeed, you might even consider whether every employee should have permission to use portable media. Companies should bear in mind the reputational damage it might suffer if found to be excessively monitoring employees You can consider taking out insurance or engaging a third party to manage your cybersecurity where the risk of attack is high or the implications particularly severe. Employees use of social media can also compromise your cybersecurity unless you have a clear social media policy that sets out limits to social media use in the workplace. This is particularly relevant where employees work with, or have access to, sensitive information. Individuals right to privacy versus security Naturally, there are implications for companies which need to monitor and store employee information or data. Any such monitoring must be proportionate and carried out in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998. Individuals rights regarding their data will be further strengthened by the introduction of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in May 2018.

The Employment Practices Code contains further guidance for businesses on monitoring employees at work. You need to inform employees that they may be monitored and it may be necessary to seek employees express consent in cases where employee communications are being intercepted. Failure to do so could mean a business facing a claim for damages from the sender, recipient or intended recipient of the communication. Employees also have a right to privacy under the Human Rights Act 1998. An employee can bring a claim for unfair dismissal where they believe their dismissal was based on evidence gathered about them through their employer s monitoring equipment that interfered with their right to privacy. Companies should also bear in mind the unquantifiable reputational damage that it might suffer if it is found to be excessively monitoring its employees. All businesses can be badly affected The bottom line, as university cybersecurity chiefs will attest, is to: Carry out a risk assessment Invest in security measures to keep your networks safe Train your staff to understand the risks to the business from cybercriminals Put clear policies in place so everyone knows what they can and cannot do in relation to portable devices and social media use Although cybercrime poses a particularly virulent threat to high-tech research, development and manufacturing organisations, everyone needs to be aware that a cyber-attack can have very serious financial implications for any business. Free Download: the CyberSecurity Crashcourse Are you even aware if you have been the victim of a cybersecurity breach? This report will help you to find out and protect yourself, Eric Hansleman from 451 Research presents a rapid-fire overview of cybersecurity , because a firewall just won t do, you need multi-layered defences to truly protect your data.

Click here to download now Related Topics How to follow up sales leads following IFSEC and FIREX International How content marketing is boosting web traffic and engagement in the security industry Many engineers are far more valuable than their managers and their salaries should reflect this

Residential landlords still haven t learned Grenfell lessons especially in social housing, survey reveals

Fewer than one in four (23%) private landlords have been in touch with tenants to discuss fire safety measures since the Grenfell Tower fire and even fewer social landlords have done likewise. Three months on from the fire, which killed at least 80 people, only 10% of tenants in social housing say they have been contacted by the landlords about fire safety. That s one of the headline findings of a survey released to coincide with Fire Door Safety Week (25 September-1 October), and the results seem to demonstrate the need for such a campaign.

Some 39% of tenants polled said they had seen fire doors propped open and 21% had noticed damage to their building s fire doors. Forty percent of renters said there is no clear fire escape route displayed. Of the 18% that have reported a fire safety infringement or concern to their landlord, almost a quarter (24%) waited weeks for a response. It is astounding to learn that in the last three months so little has been done to address the concerns of tenants and residents. Hannah Mansell, spokesperson, Fire Door Safety Week A majority (55%) say they feel uninformed about what they should do in the event of a fire and about one in four (24%) feel more anxious about living in a rented apartment since the Grenfell Tower fire. This new research shows that landlords and building owners still have a long way to go meet their fire safety responsibilities, said Hannah Mansell, spokesperson for Fire Door Safety Week. It is astounding to learn that in the last three months so little has been done to address the concerns of tenants and residents. Misunderstood The role and importance of fire doors remains widely misunderstood, believes Mansell, who is also BWF technical manager, chair of the Passive Fire Protection Forum and a trustee of the Children s Burns Trust. Many people do not realise that the real job of a fire door is to hold back fire, smoke and toxic gases, delaying the spread around a building and keeping the vital means of escape route clear.

They only work properly if they are specified, manufactured, installed and maintained correctly and, of course, closed when a fire breaks out. This is especially important in high rise buildings, houses of multiple occupancy and other types of shared sleeping accommodation. Checking fire doors should be part of a regular fire-risk assessment. This should examine all aspects of fire safety management, including active and passive fire protection measures, signage, means of escape and the specific fire plan procedures. Mansell who has spoken to IFSEC Global more extensively about the fire safety landscape believes better education and greater transparency are essential to effect meaningful change. Crystal clarity There needs to be crystal clarity about the responsible person and a total transformation of attitude towards fire safety of tenants in rented accommodation. Our focus for Fire Door Safety Week in this pivotal year is to ensure all landlords and tenants have the knowledge and resources they need to stay safe. Dany Cotton, London Fire Commissioner, oversaw the fire and rescue service s response at Grenfell Tower. London Fire Brigade fully supports Fire Door Safety Week, she said.

This is an important campaign which drives home the potentially life-saving role that fire doors play in buildings, especially residential buildings such as tower blocks. It is extremely concerning that the lives of the public and our firefighters are still being put at risk by poorly maintained fire doors and people acting irresponsibly by removing self-closers or by keeping doors wedged open. We do what we can to advise the building owner, but it s time for the responsible person to really step up. Paul Fuller CBE, chief fire officer, Bedfordshire Fire and Rescue Service Good fire doors help stop fires from spreading. Fires that spread put more lives at risk and I would urge everyone to check that their fire doors are properly maintained and kept shut. Remember they don t just protect you, but everybody in the building. Paul Fuller CBE, chief fire officer of Bedfordshire Fire and Rescue Service and chairman of the Fire Sector Federation says: It is simple. Proper fire doors save lives, but only if they are correctly made and installed, and certainly not if they are wedged open or in disrepair. Too often our officers walk into a building and see fire doors in an appalling state.

We do what we can to advise and enforce the responsibilities of a building owner, but it is time for the responsible person to really step up. That s why we are supporting Fire Door Safety Week. There can be no excuse; all the resources you need to promote door safety are there on the website and free to download. Fire Door Safety Week is run by the BWF, the BWF-Certifire Scheme and the Fire Door Inspection Scheme in partnership with the Government s Fire Kills campaign. On 30 August the Government issued fresh advice for tenants and residents on steps to take if they have any concerns about fire safety in their building: In the first instance, contact the landlord or building owner with any concerns. If still concerned and not receiving reassurance, then contact the relevant local authority or local fire and rescue service for advice. IFSEC Global is proud to support Fire Door Safety Week, which runs from 25 September to 1 October. You can pledge your support for the campaign here, and by tweeting under the hashtag #FireDoorSafetyWeek and sharing or using the wealth of resources found in the campaign s toolkit which includes a downloadable Responsible Person poster. The site also includes advice aimed at fire and health and safety professionals.

Related Topics A rogue s gallery of fire doors unworthy of the name (and perfectly good ones rendered useless) We re often dealing with decades of neglect : Hannah Mansell on fire doors and the post-Grenfell rush to improve fire safety Watch: The consequences of badly specified and fitted fire doors plus 5 tips for getting it right

We re often dealing with decades of neglect

With Fire Door Safety Week kicking off next week, IFSEC Global caught up with the campaign s spokesperson to find out how the Grenfell tragedy has affected the campaign. Also technical manager of the British Woodworking Federation, Hannah Mansell reflects on the campaign s growth, message and plans, the temptation for cutting corners in cash-strapped times, the need for coordination across the supply chain and the challenge of keeping fire safety on the media and government agenda long after the charred remnants of Grenfell Tower are demolished in 2018. Hannah also heads up the BWF s stair and BWF-CERTIFIRE schemes.

IFSEC Global: You ve been growing rapidly year on year? What do you think the reasons are? Hannah Mansell: We think it s probably about simplicity. Fire doors are technically complex products and people overlook them for that fact; they re simply not on people s radar. So our job is to get out there and keep the message simple. What they need to know is simple. Your fire doors need to be properly tested and made, maintained, and of course, not left open. Support for the campaign is wide, in all areas of fire safety. Although our message is fire doors, we develop resources and guidance for many different sectors, whether it s the responsible person, the construction industry, fire risk assessors, or tenants and users.

Each campaign has a legacy that we carry on the next year. So for instance last year, we were already focusing on shared accommodation and the rental sector. We realised our work wasn t done in that sector, which has obviously been highlighted by what s happened in the last three months. Since the tragedy there s been a high influx of new supporters in the sector. Councils have come on massively this year, housing associations, charities, landlord associations To be fair the landlord associations have always been quite good supporters. The value engineering of specification, when someone says I can cut a few corners and save you a few quid , is a really big problem And the fire brigades as well. We worked closely with London Fire Brigade last year, and this year they re doing more and going even further. All our resources can be taken and rolled out into any particular organisation or campaign. We ve made a new fire door safety test film (see below).

The last film we made, maybe five or six years ago, had massive traction. The new film is a bit more contemporary, focused on issues we commonly see on fire doors in common areas and with flat front doors doors without seals, doors without proper closers We talk about things like smoke seals and intumescent seals, but a lot of people don t know what they look like. embedded content Also our five-step check, which we also included in the film visually shows what you need to look for, and if you have any concerns, talk to your landlord or building owner. If you still have concerns, the next step is to talk to your local fire brigade who can come out and audit your building. I think in some sectors people have woken up to fire door safety, but it s an ongoing thing. People forget quite quickly. It may not be long until we re disregarding fire safety again. IG: Nature of the beast, really. Easy to get complacent when fire is such a rare thing.

Any other reasons why there are apparently so many inadequate fire doors? HM: We re not dealing with issues that have arisen in these buildings in the last 3-5 years; we re often dealing with decades of neglect of both fire doors and other fire safety systems and elements, with no one taking enough notice of them, these issues and accountability for them dropping out of sight of these responsible. We did some research a few years ago and one of the questions was: What do you think about your fire doors? A deafening silence came back. People were walking past and through them every day and not thinking about their importance. So a lot of our campaign is about outlining the steps: here s your fire door, next step is how to check it, next step is how to report it, here s how to maintain it etc. With the force of people coming together you can get change, but too much of the fire sector has worked in siloes The value engineering of specification, when someone says I can cut a few corners and save you a few quid , is a really big problem. Specification is broken, certification invalidated and there s no proof that the product will work. You can have someone offering to bang in a door like they would fit any old door, not realising that the installation of a fire door is as critical as the product itself.

People think a fire door is just like any other door. In the early days, when I first got into fire doors and was doing a lot of research and development and testing, I was surprised how the tiniest of details can have a massive impact. For instance, an excessive gap around the door or forgotten intumescent protection or seals how much is that going to affect performance during the fire? You d be surprised. In part of the fire door film we ve made this year, we ve set up a correctly fitted door versus one that s got some issues that I commonly find on site. But the bad door looks exactly the same from the outside. It s all about those tiny details compatible components, the frame, the installation etc. Even with a perfect product, installed correctly, if it s not maintained effectively, and it s not closing against its frame or if it gets wedged open etc When the time comes it s just not going to work. Of course, if it s wedged open, there s no barrier to even delay the fire.

Fire doors are also in your face. If I go to a building and see that they have shoddy fire doors, it s a pretty good indicator for me that whoever is responsible for the fire safety of the building isn t taking their responsibility seriously. Interesting that you mentioned value engineering, because cash-strapped councils are being asked to upgrade fire safety in social housing with no extra funding from government HM: I think what they have to consider is that in some cases they are looking at having to pay for decades worth of neglect. Concerns about a wide range of passive fire safety issues including fire doors have been reported for years, in all types of buildings, both public and private sector, you can look back over meeting minutes 10-15 years ago when these issues were being raised. There needs to be a long-term holistic plan. It can t just be completing one task or dealing with one element of fire safety, then it s over and dealt with and forgotten about. The risk profile of buildings is constantly changing. In some sectors there s a realisation about that. But in other sectors We got this report in from one of our BWF members.

They had refused to supply a contract and product for a large TMO for fire door upgrades because the customer wanted to break specification and didn t give a monkeys about it. That s why we need to keep up the pace of not just this campaign but the other campaigns and organisations that we work with, like the Fire Kills campaign. That s maybe what people like about the campaign: we don t make it exclusive. It doesn t matter if you re specifically into fire doors or just someone who wants to support the campaign there s something for everyone in there. With the force of people coming together you can get change, but too much of the fire sector has worked in siloes. A holistic approach might get change. Coupled of course with massive budget cuts I could give you a list as long as my arm of all the factors explaining why we sit here wondering how such a horrific thing could have happened. embedded content IG: Are there many instances where you could remedy a fire-door s deficiencies rather than having to replace the fire door altogether? HM: Lots of people get worried that they ll have to buy a new fire door.

But regular inspection and maintenance help to keep them in good working order. You can replace or adjust components, fix things before they became a major problem. Don t get me wrong, there are limitations. A door can be in such a state of disrepair that you can t fix it. That s why it comes back to having a thorough and robust maintenance regime to make sure you do enough to fix problems before they turn into something irretrievable. A fire door fitted with components suitable for a domestic setting isn t going to last long in the communal corridor of a school There are qualified fire door inspectors who can inspect a door, look at every element the frame, the installation, the ironmongery, the glazing, the door leaf, the seals, the gaps and notify the responsible person of improvements needed. One of our colleagues in the ironmongery industry did a specification for a hospital years ago. Usually hospital fire doors get battered; they can be used thousands of times a day. Twenty-six years later, because specifications for that environment and users were right, and they are regularly inspected, these doors are still going strong they would do their job in a fire.

If you fit a fire door that s designed and fitted with components suitable for a domestic setting into a communal corridor of a school, it not going to last very long. That s why the specification is so critical. Lots of people don t think about the whole supply chain; it s I ve done my bit, pass it onto the next person. It s a chain of responsibility. Fire doors are not the most interesting dinner party topic, but they play such an important role especially in buildings because of complex design, the specific needs of occupants, or if it s difficult to evacuate quickly and there is a stay-put fire plan. You need fire and smoke control doors up and down corridors and stairwells. It protects the means of escape and route for firefighters to get into the building. It includes flat front doors as well. You will also find fire doors in other parts of the building, and sometimes inside individual dwellings, depending on the layout and building types, as well as a number of other factors.

IG: Do you think the regulations themselves need clarification or strengthening? HM: My real day job is not just doing the fire door safety campaign. I m the technical manager of the British Woodworking Federation (BWF). Our members make and certificate about 2.5 million timber fire doors every year, but our organisation frequently provides technical guidance about a wide variety of timber construction products and how they relate to building regulations and building control. People often don t understand how they work; it can be a minefield. I know we re going to have a review of building regulations, but it s been on the agenda for many years and it s far, far overdue. And I m not just talking about Approved Document B. We ve got building regs that apply to new buildings, regs about refurbishment or change of use, about surrounding fire risk assessments, about the signing off of work process, the whole regulatory reform order, which came in 10 years ago and changed the responsibility and process of signing off compliance. We could sit here in five years time and have a very similar discussion unless people take heed of the scale of the problem now These are all bits of regulation that need to work together, so it s about an upgrade of regulations throughout the chain.

I don t think we can just be appeased with just an approved document review. I think when the public are calling for a building regulation review, they re talking about the whole process, not just documents that talk about fire safety in high rise buildings. One thing really highlighted over the last few weeks is how many different parties get involved in the refurb, design, specifications, supply of products, construction, the signing off of buildings. There needs to be much more clarity as to how that chain works. In the wake of Grenfell, the amount of fire safety issues reported in other buildings has been huge, not just cladding. For instance, the Camden evacuation was because a thousand fire doors were missing. When it comes to enforcing against large organisations, transparency is sometimes the issue when it goes through the courts. Who is the responsible person? And in an enormous organisation with a massive housing stock, how detached are they from the scale or severity of fire safety issues in their buildings?

We live differently to how we lived even 10-15 years ago. Elderly people are much more likely to stay in their homes longer, more people live in high rise buildings, there are people with a wide variety of additional needs who may be more vulnerable to a fire in their building. The regulations have to reflect that, and not just for the benefit of building more homes quickly, of questionable quality. IG: Has Grenfell changed your message in any way given the greater media and public awareness of the issue? HM: Fire Door Safety Week campaign has been going formally for five years . We re as determined as we ever were, to carry on promoting our campaign and working with other campaigns and initiatives in these areas. Each year, stepping up and building on what we ve done before, until we get real and lasting change. I read an opinion piece that said it will take generations to get over Grenfell. We ve got to keep this right up there in the media so we don t have a repeat.

We can t let it be swept under the carpet or not acted upon in the fullest manner. It s like that poem isn t it: For want of a nail, the Kingdom was lost . Your fire doors are almost your nails, as it were. All these little fire safety problems adding up together to create the perfect fire storm. We need a new way of looking at fire safety. Otherwise we ll do what we always did: an investigation and an inquest, and get what we always got, excuses why it can t improve, and then sort of forget about it. And the worst thing is we could sit here in five years time and have a very similar discussion unless people take heed of the scale of the problem now. There is the chance to really make building safe for generations to come. IFSEC Global is proud to support Fire Door Safety Week, which runs from 25 September to 1 October.

You can pledge your support for the campaign here, and by tweeting under the hashtag #FireDoorSafetyWeek and sharing or using the wealth of resources found in the campaign s toolkit.

Related Topics Watch: The consequences of badly specified and fitted fire doors plus 5 tips for getting it right Fire-door safety campaigners renew calls for public register of responsible persons Willmott Dixon issues fire door guidance to 3,000 staff thanks to Fire Door Safety Week

Grenfell inquiry begins: The numbers that lay bare the funding crisis hampering high-rise improvements

The government has ordered councils to review and upgrade fire safety in social housing across England and Wales. After decades of neglect, however, the bill for remedying myriad shortcomings is astronomical and many councils are nearly technically insolvent. The public inquiry into the Grenfell Tower fire opens today.

It s the start of a very long process, with the interim report due to be published in Easter. The inquiry s remit encompasses the cause and spread of the fire, high-rise regulations, and the actions of the local authority, Kensington and Chelsea Council. Residents and victims will watch retired judge Sir Martin Moore-Bick give a 45-minute statement. The fire, which killed at least 80 people in June, has pushed the fire safety debate beyond the fire-safety sector and into the national media. Long frustrated with being stonewalled by government, suddenly leading figures in the industry were thrust in front of TV cameras. The debate focused on cladding initially but has widened to almost every aspect of fire safety. So horrendous was the Grenfell tragedy that people are finally taking fire safety seriously in a way that never happened after Lakanal. That central and local government are finally taking the issue seriously is no cause to celebrate it shouldn t have taken such loss of life to jolt people into action. And where there s a will there isn t always a way where money is involved as our infographic below shows.

Free Download: The key to mitigating cybersecurity risks Exploiting IoT technology without creating cybersecurity vulnerabilities is one of the defining challenges in today s security landscape.

This report will help you to see why third parties should adhere to secure by design principles and why the necessary convergence of IT and security departments demands a holistic approach .

Download now

ONVIF Q&A: Latest profiles, cybersecurity and the Highways England project

ONVIF recently launched a new access control profile a specification for standardising technologies from different vendors to promote integration and interoperability and has another in the pipeline. We asked Stuart Rawling, chairman of the ONVIF communication committee, to tell us what the new profiles were all about. Director of global business development at Pelco as well, Rawling also reflects on ONVIF s raison d etre , its cybersecurity work, keeping pace with the dizzying evolution of technology and the organisation s standardisation work with Highways England.

IFSEC Global: Please tell us about the new profile you launched in July Stuart Rawling: Profile A is a sister profile to what we already had in the access control space. We have released Profile C, which enables device configuration, event and alarm management, and door access control. So you can configure those devices with all that information. Profile A is a higher level system profile, more about granting and revoking credentials, changing privileges. And it has a functionality that better enables integration between access control and video management systems. So it fits side by side with Profile C but provides that higher level with more functionality. IFSEC Global: Is it worth explaining the purpose of these profiles for someone not familiar with them? SR: A profile is a feature set pulled from an ONVIF core specification, which is a master document about standardising and interfacing different products from a variety of different vendors. When the industry moved into the IT space, a lot of manufacturers came up with their own interfaces.

ONVIF standardises those interfaces to make integration easier for all types of users, because you can have product interoperability from different vendors using the same interface. From an integration perspective, installation is easier because you re not having to download different drivers. Manufacturers follow a troubleshooting, testing and conformance process that enables that to be done up front, so the users only need to do the system configuration. From the manufacturers perspective, interoperability investment is lower because they can use these standard interfaces to talk to multiple products. It allows them to instead invest resources into bringing more relevant features and iterations to the product line. embedded content IG: Is it difficult to keep these standards up to date given the rapid pace of technological change? SR: Yes, to some degree. You could say that standards in general tend to lag a little bit behind technology. But it all depends on how we approach it.

If you take our next profile, Profile T, which we re working on now, that s an iteration that takes into account the fact that technology has progressed since we released Profile S a number of years ago. We write these standards to be somewhat technology-agnostic. For example, right now the big buzz is 4K, H.265 and things like that. While Profile T can support that, we re not tied to that standard. If some better codec comes out in the future we can still incorporate it into our ecosystem. Because one of the interfaces may be: What video formats does this device support? And the devices can negotiate in which format to transmit between each other. IG: You recently did some work with Highways England? SR: That s a great end user story.

Highways England have a lot of legacy equipment from different vendors. The organisation is trying to standardise their deployment model for the long term so they can use a set standard in a way that allows them more flexibility. We had a standard in the analogue days: PAL in the UK, so the video was very standardised. They are looking for that level of standardisation. ONVIF has been working with them to develop something that can help large organisations migrate to a standardised approach but that also works for different stakeholders in the process. It s very similar to an initiative in the US called NTCIP National Transportation Communications for ITS Protocol, the standard for traffic management used by the US Department of Transportation. IG: Anything else you want to add about ONVIF? SR: We tend to get a lot of press these days around the cybersecurity aspects of products, especially with the cybersecurity threats we re reading about every single day. This was a recognised concern for ONVIF several years ago.

The manufacturers got together and as part of our core specification we wrote some security policies for manufacturers to follow, as well as providing a standardised interface for execution policies. But of course, good security is a combination of technology and policy. So while manufacturers who have implemented this standard have the technology, we also rely on the end users and consultants to put in best practices in the deployment of that technology.

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6 Things you need to know about FIM Expo

If you install or commission fire alarms, you think you ve probably seen all the kit you possibly could by now. Bit of wire here, manual call point there, fire alarm sounder there. But the industry is evolving and new developments are happening all the time: new products, new equipment, new gadgets.

Luckily for you, FIM Expo is just around the corner: Wednesday 4 October, Glasgow Science Centre. So without further ado, here s six things you need to know about FIM Expo. #1: You can get your hands on all the kit you like and have a try before you buy. Yes ladies and gents, there really is nothing better than actually being able to see how the kit works before you decide to go ahead with it. Exhibitors love nothing more than explaining all their new products, so you can get a demonstration of how it works and get all your questions answered. #2: No long queues. FIM Expo is a smaller show, so there is no queuing to get in, no waiting for your turn to see your favourite exhibitor, and a much more efficient way of visiting lots of different manufacturers at once. None of the fuss and hustle and bustle of the bigger shows. #3: You can find out which bits of kit are compatible with kit you might already be familiar with. My God, it can get frustrating when you find out that your panel that you ve just bought is not compatible with the rest of the kit you currently install. Argh. Nightmare.

Sometimes you really need an expert opinion to guide you on your way. Our exhibitors will be on hand to discuss all your need and field all of those awkward: Does this thing work with this old bit of kit I have? Or do I need to buy everything new again? questions. #4: Free BS 5839-1:2017 revision seminar. Get there early and secure your space, because we re putting on a free seminar on the update to BS 5839-1:2017 at 11am. In the update there is a brand new section on multi-sensor detectors, including a new annexe E, which discusses the selection of multi-sensor detectors; an update on double pole isolation; a new section on video alarm systems; and the removal of the tables from Annex F (just for simplicity). The seminar is free and CPD-accredited! #5: Learn about the future of FD&A qualifications. Martin Duggan, FIA General Manager will be discussing development of new FD&A Qualifications. There are four new qualifications, which are provided through the new awarding organisation for the fire industry, the FIA AO.

The Qualifications are designed to reflect the four main job roles of the sector designer, installer, maintainer, and commissioner with one qualification for each. This seminar starts after lunch at 2pm, so finish up your sandwich and head to the seminar room. Both seminars are CPD accredited. Can you believe all of this is free? Ker-ching! #6: Free lunch. Yep, free tea and coffee. Free lunch. What more could anyone want? Details Wednesday 4 October 2017.

Doors open at 9.30am. The show closes at 3:30pm. Entry is free but you will need to register to ensure entry into the exhibition. We recommend getting there in good time so that you can collect your visitor s badge, grab a coffee, and take in all the sights. Click here to register . Pop in your details. It s all free.

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A rough guide to fire extinguisher servicing and the service-free model

The fire extinguisher market has changed substantially in recent years, with products becoming cheaper and the launch of service free extinguishers. Is it time to rethink your arrangements? What are the requirements and how much flexibility do you have?

Changing needs The best practice recommendations on extinguisher servicing are described in BS5306-3:2009. (The BSi shop website confirms that it s currently under review, which can only be a good thing given developments in the sector since 2009). There s also information within government guidance. While these documents are not legislation as such, should it all go wrong, they would be relied upon in court as evidence of expected practice to comply with the law. These documents specify the following: A weekly check that extinguishers are in place and undamaged Visual inspections at least monthly , by the responsible person, to confirm the extinguisher is in place, unobstructed, visible, has operating instructions which are clean and legible, has not been operated, is undamaged, the pressure gauge or indicator (if fitted) shows it s functional, and seals and tamper indicators are not missing Annual servicing by a competent person While points one and two above can be carried out by almost anyone with basic instruction, number three is generally reserved for qualified technicians. Annual servicing involves knowledge of different types of cylinders and their servicing needs under BS5306-3, knowledge of safe methods of work when working with pressure vessels, the use of specialist equipment and refill facilities, and more. When looking for a company to carrying out a servicing contract you must ensure that they are competent. The best way to do this is to look for evidence that they are registered with BAFE under the SP101/ST104 scheme. If you wanted to train someone in-house to take on this task there are three day courses available. This traditional route for annual servicing is the way to go if you have standard extinguishers (ie not the service-free type).

You should also use a competent contractor to commission your extinguishers (as recommended within BS5306-6). The need for commissioning tends to rule out the idea of buying cheaper extinguishers directly from, for instance, internet suppliers, as you probably won t have the qualifications to do it in-house. In practice, commissioning involves a full check equivalent to a basic service, proper installation and signage. What about service-free extinguishers? A new brand of extinguishers, P50 , is being marketed as offering a new alternative to annual servicing contracts. The extinguishers come with three alternative contents at present: dry powder, aqueous film forming foam (AFFF) and wet chemical (used on oil/ fat fires). They: Have a 10-year warranty and 10 year service-free life Come with a free refill offer if the pressure drops or its used on a real fire are made of non-corrosive materials so they re good in tough environments where other extinguishers would rust are offered with commissioning and installation within the price AFFF and dry powder extinguishers don t require emptying and refilling every five years (a requirement for most standard extinguishers) They cost a bit more than standard extinguishers (a 6 litre AFFF including the installation is 130 plus VAT) but because of the savings they should make good financial sense. However, before deciding whether to take this route you must be sure that you have the resources to carry out the annual check it s not difficult and can be carried out using the magnet provided to check the pressure gauges, a visual inspection and quick wipe. Instructions are given by the manufacturer.

One catch is that there are presently no carbon dioxide extinguishers in the range. This could mean that you have a small number of traditional extinguishers alongside your P50s, thus still requiring a service visit by a qualified technician, and losing at least some of the financial savings. In conclusion You re unlikely to want to undertake servicing of standard extinguishers in-house unless you re a very large operation that can justify the three-day course. Even then, you ll need to oversee the quality of workmanship: this is a safety critical task and not worth cutting corners. If you only require types of extinguisher which are available in the service-free range this could work for you. However in practice most businesses need some carbon dioxide extinguisher cover due to electrical equipment within their building. This being the case, you should weigh up the initial and annual costs carefully before making your decision. As a final word of caution, don t lose sight of the fact that extinguishers are present for use in a life-threatening emergency. This is not an area where cost savings should override other considerations.

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This report will help you to see why third parties should adhere to secure by design principles and why the necessary convergence of IT and security departments demands a holistic approach .

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Axis Partner Showcase: Don t miss out on connected surveillance and access control solutions from 37 partners

Axis Communications is delighted to invite you to attend its second Partner Showcase in October 2017, demonstrating cutting-edge, connected security tech and best-in-class retail analytics, behavioural analysis, sustainability and cybersecurity. Axis wants you to exploit the opportunities created by rapid changes in technology and future-proof your systems for the changes and challenges of tomorrow. As the market abandons proprietary systems and embraces open platforms which themselves accelerate innovation Axis has gathered 37 integration partners to give you an insight into how you can boost efficiency, enhance processes, cut costs and improve safety and security.

Fit for purpose, fit for future .

An Axis mantra Whether you re a system integrator, installer, distributor, consultant or end user, you will benefit from seeing solutions from the following partners: Aimetis, Agent Vi , Araani, Assa Abloy , Cathexis Europe Ltd , Citilog, ComNet Europe Ltd , Customer Clever Ltd, Dantech Electronic Engineering , Digital Barriers, Dot Origin Ltd, EIZO Limited , Entelec Control Systems, Falt Communications AB , Genetec Europe, Herta Security , IPS, Milestone Systems , Mirasys, Morphean , NVT Phybridge, Observit AB , Optex (Europe) Ltd, P3R Lab , Prysm, Secure Logiq Ltd , Seetec GmbH, Siklu Communication , Sound Intelligence, Telcred AB , Vaxtor, Veracity Ltd , Xtralis UK Ltd, Wavestore Global Ltd Axis Partner Showcase: 11 October 2017: 10:00am-4:00pm BST Tenants Hall, Tatton Park, Knutsford, Cheshire, WA16 6QN, UK