development

Comelit s IP door entry system used for Battersea Power Station development

IFSEC exhibitor One of the UK s most iconic developments Circus West apartments at Battersea Power Station in London is using Comelit s IP video entry system. The first phase of the development comprises of 865 apartments at the Circus West site and uses Comelit s IP-enabled ViP entry system that sits on a shared network. The apartments are fitted with ICONA monitors.

More than 50 entrances are equipped with a mixture of 3one6 Sense flush-mounted panels, Vandalcom digital panels and Vandalcom single button panels. Help points have also been fitted in the carparks so residents can speak to the concierge/security office. The ICONA monitors in each apartment feature a 16:9 4.3-inch colour screen with capacitive, touchscreen and swipe activation. The 3one6 entrance panels feature LCD graphic displays, in 4mm mirror-finishes or brushed steel, and have a concealed loudspeaker. The network itself, supplied by Skanska Konnect, incorporates the site s access control system, as well as Comelit s video entry system, which consists of over 900 devices. Because it is IP-based, the system has no distance limitations and can provide an unlimited number of users with simultaneous video and audio communications. The on-site concierge is able to manage calls made from call points to apartments, and can call individual apartments. Residents can call the concierge via the intercom directory on their ICONA monitors, and can communicate with the other apartments via the same directory, which can be programmed by the installer on request. We are absolutely thrilled to have been chosen to take part in this iconic and exceptional project, said Francesca Boeris, Comelit s managing director.

With our emphasis on cutting-edge product design and aesthetics, we are proud to be associated with a development which showcases some of the best designers in the world. Comelit is exhibiting at IFSEC International between 20-22 June 2017 at London ExCeL. You will find them on stand G1150.

Get your free badge now. Visit Europe s only large-scale security event in 2017 Taking place in London, 20 22 June 2017, IFSEC International gives you exclusive hands-on access to over 10,000 security solutions, live product demonstrations, and networking with over 27,000 security professionals. Covering every aspect of security, from access control and video surveillance to smart buildings, cyber, border control and so much more.

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The security of security is our top priority in the IoT era

With data protection laws being tightened and internet of things hacks proliferating, physical security vendors are talking a lot more about cybersecurity than they used to. For Genetec, whose systems are popular in the enterprise space and installed in 70% of airports in the Middle East, safeguarding systems against cyberattack is a particularly urgent priority. We spoke to Simon Cook, sales engineering manager EMEA and APAC, about the company s defining mantra: the security of security.

Genetec has just been confirmed as sponsor for Borders & Infastructure Expo, which debuts at IFSEC 2017 in June. IFSEC Global: Why is cybersecurity such a big priority for Genetec right now? Simon Cook: The security of security should be high on every physical security professional s priority list. A large part of this is the recent growth in DoS, or denial-of-service, attacks that took place last year, targeting internet of things devices from cameras to campus vending machines. But these things aren t new; DoS attacks have been happening since the start of the internet and cybercrime. The 21 st Century has been characterised by a large growth in the IoT. This is great for business efficiency and personal communication, but the more devices that come online, the more vulnerabilities there are for cybercriminals to exploit, especially seeing as pretty much everything can be connected to the internet these days even fridges! What we want to do is be sure that whatever is connected to our solutions via our customers networks is pure , or safe It s pretty terrifying when you think about the potential of DoS attacks, which is only growing with the number of connected devices. Think about it: when you get 1.5 million devices generating over 600-odd gig of traffic, aimed at a handful of organisations, the result is going to be quite a serious attack.

The world that Genetec operates in seems, on the surface, to be largely physical as we deal with CCTV, access control and automatic number plate recognition (ANPR) to name a few. But, it s important to recognise, which we do, that crime is moving away from the physical world and into the cyber. This is why the surveillance market should be thinking more carefully about security from a cyber threat angle, rather than purely from the physical. (Check out the latest solutions from Genetec at IFSEC International, 20-22 June 2017, London ExCeL. You can find Genetec on stand F500. Get your free badge now.) This issue is also now consumer as well as commercial. More and more we see people with cameras at home that can be turned into a node and hacked, which in a way is even more worrying as they will lack the awareness and training to ensure their devices are protected that professionals in the security industry have. What we want to do is be sure that whatever is connected to our solutions via our customers networks is pure , or safe. The vital thing is to work to continuously build up that level of security in response to the rapid development of cyber-crime. We call this the security of security .

We have a lot of high level enterprise customers so a lot of banks, airports, big businesses etcetera so access into their networks could open up some critical issues for customers. We need to make sure that whatever connects to our system does not open a door for potential attacks. embedded content IG: So what measures do you take to ensure connected systems are as robust against cyber-attacks as Genetec solutions? When we develop our software we ask ourselves the important questions from the outset to ensure our tech is secured against anything which may try to attack it. Penetration testing, regression testing, adding devices and having them tested is all part of the development of the software rather than relying on just reacting to cyber-crime by retrofitting after an attack. We ve done a number of regression tests on our software so we know our platforms are as secure as they can be. But, the cleverer you make the tech, the more sophisticated the attackers become so it is a constant battle. Another problem for us is that we want to be more open platform, so we don t just connect cameras but access control, body-worn cameras, other third-party systems. So, in the unified space, when we try to build up one holistic platform, we have to do a lot of testing to ensure we can still call ourselves secure.

The way we counter this is through authorisation, authentication and encryption. We start by using certificate-based authentication. This may sound complex, but if you use online banking, you have a certificate between yourself and the third-party so the browsers share certificates to verify you are who you say you are, and the banks are who they say they are. Some hardware we work with has a good level of security built in; some of the more traditional stuff is more legacy, and we have to compensate for these devices In terms of encryption, we used to use SSL. But, a quick google will now tell you that SSL can be hacked quite easily. There are even wiki pages about how to hack SSL within 20 minutes! So we had to evolve and now use TLS, or transport layer security, which is a cryptographic protocol that provides communications security over a computer network , which is much more advanced. The thing with hacking, it is company to company, person to person, government to government, and it can be used in many ways. It s not always just the case that cybercriminals want to break in and steal your information or credit card.

Sometimes DoS attacks aim to bring websites or companies down for a period of time. In the 50s, 60s and 70s we wanted to protect against bank robberies and attacks on people and property. But these days you can bring a company down without leaving your house. So, we have to get smarter. Some hardware we work with has a good level of security built in; some of the more traditional stuff is more legacy, and we have to compensate for these devices. I m sure you can see now why the security of security is something that always has to be top of mind for Genetec! The industry already has to collaborate to make sure these devices connect to each other presumably collaboration is just as important where cyber is concerned Absolutely. And it s not just between manufacturers. Whether it s end users, integrators or consultants, to a lot of our customers we are trusted advisors.

We don t just sell kit and software and then move on to the next customer, and there is a gap of knowledge in the industry for this level and kind of security. So we are trying to work with other manufacturers to collaborate with our systems integrators, consultants and end users so that best practice is followed. Genetec has always been very IT-focused and we work with IT departments too. We want everyone that works with us to know that they can trust our solutions to be secure, and that we can offer them advice on security if they ever feel any confusion or worry about the security of their technology. Many of our customers are more enterprise level, so you can see how a breach could not only put company data at risk, but even people s lives in some instances Is there any trade-off with convenience and the user experience when you tighten up cybersecurity? We try and make the system as user-friendly as possible. When we talk about certificates and TLS, it s all done at installation level. So the customer will work with one of our certified installers, who will be familiar with our product, and the operator shouldn t notice any difference to their user experience. They just type the username and password on their client machine and the security is all done on set up.

Once they are logged in, what they do and don t have access to has already been set up according to company policy. All the clever stuff happens under the hood. Cybersecurity is presumably a particularly high priority in critical national infrastructure? Of course, many of our customers are more enterprise level, so airports, train stations, cities, high end retail, mid-tier retail you can see how a breach could not only put company data at risk, but even people s lives in some instances. Airports, for example, are one of our largest sectors: at last count, 85 of the world s largest airports use Genetec systems, and 70% of all airports in the Middle East one of our fastest growing markets are protected by Genetec Security Center systems. As well as this, when it comes to urban security, we have worked with a lot of blue light services in city centres and they want us to do a lot of regression testing. This is not something we re doing just because it s a buzzword or because of the DOS coverage last year. It s to keep up to speed with developments to make sure we are in line with best practice. It goes back to building this into the core rather than being a retrofit after an event or attack.

And it s equally important to encourage our partners and customers to be vigilant. Now we re starting to look at cybercrime insurance. As more devices come online, there are more data points and we need to be more cautious about what we are adding to the system. We also need to continue our core precautions of regression and security testing to make sure that security devices don t expose holes into our customers networks. Presumably cybersecurity will be a big talking point on your stand at IFSEC 2017? This will all be very much a focus when our customers end users, integrators and consultants visit the booth. See you at stand F500! Check out the latest solutions from Genetec at IFSEC International, 20-22 June 2017, London ExCeL. You can find Genetec on stand F500.

Get your free badge now. Visit Europe s leading security event in June 2017 Register here to attend IFSEC International where you will be able to take advantage of our meetings service, allowing you to select and meet with the manufacturers you want to see and with 600 companies exhibiting you are not short on choice. There are also discounts of up to 20% across a large range of products at the show, helping you to get the best value for your money.

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BA (Hons) Security Consultancy

Is this course for me?

BA (Hons) Security Consultancy

This programme is suitable for those who aspire to become qualified and capable security consultants. It is designed for employees who are currently working in, or have the potential to work in, a key role
with responsibilities for ensuring that security protection is incorporated into operations and organisational functions. Alternatively, you could have experience and skills in security consultancy or management as a generalist or specialist.

We welcome mature students who have not been within a formal education system for some time or graduates from other relevant programmes who wish to continue their professional and academic development.

What will this course cover?

We have designed this course to provide prospective and practising security consultants with a range of skills and knowledge in order to be able to operate with confidence within the security sector. Our aim is to blend the academic framework for consultancy practices with the security needs and requirements for today’s businesses. It will also allow you to develop
your advisory, technical, business, communication and management skills

From an initial focus on the more fundamental elements of security processes, the programme will address the requirements for project planning and management skills and knowledge, before moving towards the development of strategic and other essential functions.

You will benefit from using our virtual learning environment (VLE), which will help you to fit in your studies around your personal and professional commitments and study at times that suit you. This programme is eligible for funding under the Ministry of Defence Enhanced Learning Credits (ELC) scheme. Our ELCAS number is 1682.

Attendance and Personal Study

You will be expected to allocate up to 20 hours a week for self-directed study.

Avigilon video surveillance solutions: A brand profile

The first and only CCTV hardware developer to take resolution into the 7K realm, Avigilon is a highly respected video surveillance company headquartered in Canada. History Avigilon is a Canadian company that specialises in the development, design and sale of video surveillance and management, access control and video analytics solutions. Founded in 2004 it posted its first EBITDA profit in the financial year ending 31st December 2009 (FY9) and floated on the Toronto stock exchange in 2011.

Avigilon has since invested heavily in its domestic and international expansion. It acquired access control company RedCloud Security for US$17m in 2013, followed by video analytics specialist VideoIQ for US$32m in 2014, and the patent portfolio of video analytics firm ObjectVideo for US$80m in 2014. Market position An aggressive business strategy has delivered considerable financial return and Avigilon remains one the largest players in a global security and surveillance market within which no one supplier is estimated to hold more than 6% share. Avigilon s turnover has grown at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 71% over the last 9 years to reach US$354m in FY16, yielding adjusted EBITDA of US54m. Target verticals include retail, banking, education, casinos, critical national infrastructure (CNI) and transportation, with high profile customers including Miami Dolphins Hard Rock Stadium, the Universities of Tennessee and Sydney, King Abdulaziz International Airport in Saudi Arabia, the City of Pittsboro and the Old Bailey in London. embedded content Latest technologies Avigilon s flagship Control Center network video management software is now in version 6.6 having been regularly updated to support emerging security and surveillance hardware. The company also delivers a range of HD cameras, recorders and edge solutions with a particular emphasis on providing big megapixel IP cameras with embedded video analytics solutions. Its latest hardware includes cameras with multiple sensors and individually configurable camera heads that provide several viewpoints from a single platform to minimise blind spots. Avigilon also introduced 6K 24MP and 7K 30 megapixel HD cameras as well as 4k (8mp) and 5K (16pm) cameras in 2015.

The company has invested a lot of time in the development of innovative self-learning video analytics. It recently launched a deep learning AI search engine (Appearance Search) able to search hours of video footage to find specific persons of interest across multiple cameras, tracking their route and last know locations. Elsewhere a partnership with security firm G4S involves an 8 week trial of video analytics to prevent smuggling in UK prisons, tracking the movement of people at the prison s perimeter who often throw drugs and other contraband over prison walls. embedded content Avigilon and installers/integrators Avigilon s sales and distribution model is based on a business to business (B2B) rather than business to consumer (B2C) model that relies heavily on a large network of installers, resellers and systems integrators in Canada, US, UK, EMEA, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. UK installers include Contact Security, API, iFacility, Amax, Sonic Security Services, Eclipse (IP), Vuetek, AlertSystems, Advance Security and iC2. Rather than selling direct, Avigilon s own sales staff work with those partners to develop security and surveillance solutions which are tailored to individual customer requirements in its key industry verticals. The company runs an extensive global partnership programme that offers various incentives to its partners, including silver, gold and platinum certification; co-branded sales and marketing material; and access to market development funds and financial rebates. Visit Europe s leading security event in June 2017 Register to attend IFSEC International where you will be able to network with over 30,000 of your industry peers, meeting new suppliers and gaining access to the latest and best security products to hit the market, helping you gain a competitive advantage over your competitors. You will also be able to get hands on to test and trial the latest technology at the Installer World Zone, which is sponsored by Risco Group , so that you can select not only the best priced products but you will be confident that it works for you.

Click here to register your place now to join us at London Excel on 20 22 June 2017.

Security & Safety jobs in Griston

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Access control trends in the leisure industry: integrator Q&A

Access Control Trends In The Leisure Industry: Integrator Q&A

Modern access control systems offer more than just security and this has particular appeal in a leisure sector whose customers often double as members who visit regularly. That s the view of Stephen Goodridge, product manager at Banbury-based integration firm All Right Now. We spoke to him about a recent installation at Bristol Museum, the opportunities and challenges posed to installers and integrators in the leisure sector and the direction of travel for deployments in this vertical.

IFSEC Global: Why do you think you won the Bristol museum contract? Stephen Goodridge: We won the initial contract as we interacted with the client in a timely fashion and provided competitive pricing. We got the second phase of the project without it going to tender as they were very happy with our work in the first phase. IG: What challenges did the Bristol museum pose and how did you overcome them? SG: This is a much larger question really addressed in the case study, but in principle the main challenge was the number of stakeholders involved from the council IT department to the end customer as well as a number of different suppliers. I would say that the key to success on this project was communication and a willingness to work with all parties to sort out the teething issues which arose. IG: Why do you specialise in leisure, healthcare and education sectors in particular? SG: As a small business you have to focus your resources. Access control is a complex industry and you can only hope to gain a reputation and foothold if you specialise in a limited number of vertical sectors.

By focusing you can establish a good reputation and then you can leverage that reputation to branch out into other sectors in time. In the leisure industry, fingerprint biometrics are seen as a way of reducing the ongoing cost of purchasing credentials for members as well as preventing the passing on of credentials IG: What challenges do leisure businesses pose and how do you overcome them? SG: Leisure businesses are very diverse and therefore have very different needs. They tend to have lower budgets than most so not only do they need a solution that works, they also need it to be low cost. As a systems integrator and installer we find that our experience across a broad range of organisations both large and small enables us to advise our clients from a much broader outlook than they would have just from within their own organisation. In this way we can hopefully add value and ensure that the end solution is what the customer actually wanted and works well for them. IG: Anything else to add about your business, the access control market or the security industry generally? SG: ARN All Right Now have had a very good year and firmly established ourselves as a respected provider of access control services to the leisure industry. We have a UK-wide network of engineers and are well placed to take advantage of this network to continue our expansion in 2017.

Within the leisure industry there are a couple of trends when it comes to credentials. On the one hand fingerprint biometrics are seen as a way of reducing the ongoing cost of purchasing credentials for their members as well as preventing the passing on of credentials. On the other hand there are the software and hardware suppliers for whom the ongoing sale of expensive credentials is a fundamental part of their business strategy and a revenue stream they are loathe to relinquish, as it helps them to keep costs down in other areas. At the same time, clubs are looking to get more data on how their members use their clubs, which in turn really requires some form of smart credential. We think there are some interesting new technologies coming onto the market which could well revolutionise this sector once they ve proven as reliable and which our development team are at the forefront of developing. We think these will be ready towards the end of 2017 but it will probably be 2018 before the technology is taken up by the mainstream. Find out about how All Right Now installed the Fastlane turnstile from IDL in Bristol Museum Download: The Video Surveillance Report 2016 This exclusive report covers the security needs of surveillance systems as shaped by the physical environment including: What do security professionals think about plug-and-play systems Challenges like low-light conditions or large spaces and the threats posed in various sectors Which cutting-edge features such as mobile access, PTZ smart controls or 4K resolution are most important to security professionals What are the most important factors driving upgrades and would end users consider an upgrade to HD analogue Download the full report here.

FLIR Systems acquires developer behind world s smallest drone: Prox Dynamics

FLIR Systems Acquires Developer Behind World  S Smallest Drone: Prox Dynamics

FLIR Systems has acquired Prox Dynamics AS, the developer behind the world s smallest drone. FLIR, a world leader in the development of thermal imaging infrared cameras, has paid around $134m in cash for the Norway-based company. Founded in Oslo in 2007, Prox Dynamics develops nano-class unmanned aerial systems (UAS) for military and para-military intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance applications.

The PD-100 Black Hornet Prox Dynamics also develops small, light, covert aerial sensors. The Prox Dynamics Personal Reconnaissance System (PRS) features their pocket-sized, hand-launched Black Hornet aerial sensor and hand controller. The PD-100 Black Hornet is the smallest operational drone in the world by far, according to Prox Dynamics. Weighing only 18 grams equivalent to just three sheets of paper they are mounted with day or night-vision cameras. The Black Hornet aerial sensor already uses FLIR s Lepton micro thermal camera, visible spectrum cameras, advanced low-power rotor technology and proprietary software for flight control, stabilisation and communications. Weighing less than one ounce, the Black Hornet helicopter can fly for up to 25 minutes at line-of-sight distances of up to one mile. FLIR, which extends its airborne sensor product line with the acquisition, says it intends to invest in optimising the PRS platform to enhance range, cost, flexibility and performance. The Prox Dynamics team, said FLIR in the announement, will benefit from close interaction with FLIR s thermal sensor development group as well as the ability to leverage FLIR s brand, distribution, and customer support infrastructure to better serve a global base of users. Prox Dynamics will become FLIR s Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) division within its surveillance section.

This acquisition adds a unique unmanned aerial systems capability to our portfolio, says Andy Teich, President and CEO of FLIR. The Prox Dynamics team has created a highly-differentiated solution, incorporating our Lepton sensor, for advanced intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance that fits well with our vision for growth for our surveillance segment. The team at Prox Dynamics operates with a commercial mindset, which is a great fit for FLIR s commercially developed, military qualified, or CDMQ, operating philosophy. We are excited to welcome the Prox Dynamics team to FLIR and look forward to working together to further advance this remarkable system capability. IFSEC International 2017 (20-22 June 2017, London ExCeL) will again feature the Drone Zone. Brought to you in partnership with the UK Drone Show, the Drone Zone will bring together exhibitors with drone and anti-drone technology into a dedicated area to showcase their high-quality UAV products. Download: The Video Surveillance Report 2016 This exclusive report covers the security needs of surveillance systems as shaped by the physical environment including: What do security professionals think about plug-and-play systems Challenges like low-light conditions or large spaces and the threats posed in various sectors Which cutting-edge features such as mobile access, PTZ smart controls or 4K resolution are most important to security professionals What are the most important factors driving upgrades and would end users consider an upgrade to HD analogue Download the full report here.

Breckland Council – Local Plan Part 2

Table 12.1 Summary of Site Assessment Great Ellingham Emerging OptionsSettlementSite ReferenceUse TypeSummary of SAInterim Site AssessmentGt EllinghamLP037001Residential

Land, water and soil resources: Greenfield Grade 2. Groundwater Source Protection Zone 3. Climate change and air pollution: The site is distant from the settlement boundary and the services and facilities that Gt.Ellingham provides.

The 2014 SHLAA determined the site to be ‘deliverable’ where highways comments indicated that the site would require footways improvements. However, 2015 Highways comments indicated the site was constrained by ‘severe highways constraints’. The SA highlighted the quality of the agricultural /Greenfield land and the distance of the site from key services and facilities and the settlement boundary.

Interim Conclusion: ‘Unreasonable’.

Unreasonable AlternativeGt EllinghamLP037002Residential

Land, water and soil resources: Greenfield Grade 3. Groundwater Source protection Zone 3. Climate change and air pollution:The site is distant from the settlement boundary and the key services and facilities that Gt.Ellingham provides

The 2014 SHLAA determined the site to be ‘non-deliverable’ due to the distance from the settlement boundary. The SA concludes negatively. The site is some distance from the village, services and facilities

Interim Conclusion: ‘Unreasonable’.

Unreasonable AlternativeGt EllinghamLP037003Residential

Land, water & Soil resources: The site is situated upon agricultural land grade 3. Climate change and air pollution The site adjoins the settlement boundary. Inclusive communities/ economic development Site improves choice and access to facilities

The 2014 SHLAA determined this site to be ‘deliverable’.The SA indicated that the land was distant from key facilities and situated upon agricultural land of high quality; however, development here would be a continuation of the built form. Interim Conclusion: ‘Deliverable’

Reasonable AlternativeGt EllinghamLP037004Residential

Land, water & Soil resources:The site is situated upon grade 2 agricultural land, with the potential to impact upon the aquifer. Climate change and air pollution: The site adjoins the settlement boundary and is central to the existing built form. The 2014 SHLAA determined this site to be ‘non-deliverable’ due to highways constraints. Further Highways comments indicated that the constraints could be overcome . The SA concluded that although the site was situated upon agricultural land of high quality, and would have an impact upon the aquifer. The site however is close to the central area of the settlement and adjoins the current build up area. Any development should reflect the existing form and character .Interim Conclusion: deliverable. Planning History: the site is subject to a planning application for 9 dwellings, 3pl/2015/0487/0, previous application 3pl/2014/0991/O 13 homes was refused. Interim Conclusion: ‘Developable’.

Reasonable AlternativeGt EllinghamLP037004aResidential

Land, water & Soil resources: The site is situated upon agricultural land Grade 2 and situated within Groundwater Source protection zone 3 and part brownfield.

Climate change and air pollution:The site is adjacent to the settlement boundary. Inclusive communities/ economic development Site improves choice and access to facilities. residential development would result in loss of employment. Cultural – development would have to take into account views across to the Church The 2014 SHLAA determined this site to be ‘non-deliverable’ due to the contamination of the land and issues that this would have surrounding viability from the existing use of part of the site. 2015 Highways comments indicated that the site has ‘severe highways constraints’. Although close to the centre of the settlement the site is disconnected by the Attleborough road B1077. The SA highlighted that the site is part situated upon agricultural land of high quality grade 2 with the remaining in industrial use. Interim Conclusion: ‘Unreasonable’.

Unreasonable AlternativeGt EllinghamLP037005Residential

Land, water & Soil resources: The site is situated upon agricultural land grade 3. Climate change and air pollution The site adjoins the settlement boundary. Inclusive communities/ economic development Site improves choice and access to facilities. The 2014 SHLAA determined this site to be ‘deliverable’.The SA indicated that the land was distant from key facilities and situated upon agricultural land of high quality; however, development here would be a continuation of the built form. Planning History 3PL/2014/1366/F permission for 4 dwellings. Interim Conclusion: ‘Deliverable’.

Reasonable AlternativeGt EllinghamLP037006Residential

Land, water & Soil resources:The site is situated upon grade 2 agricultural land within groundwater source protection zone 3. The site is situated within the character area of the Wayland Plateau.

The 2014 SHLAA considered the site to be ‘deliverable’ with highways comments indicating that ‘Penhill Road would probably be unsuitable for access to this site. 2015 Highways comments indicated that the site has ‘severe highways constraints’. Church Street access is possible, however the road this opens out onto is low quality and junction improvements would almost certainly be required, ranging at around 100,000′. The SA highlighted that the site is situated upon agricultural land of Grade 2 quality and that the site is within an area of zone 3 groundwater source protection. The site is situated within the ‘Wayland Plateau’ character area, and, as such, development must take into consideration the “linear character of the settlements”. Interim Conclusion: ‘Unreasonable’.

Unreasonable AlternativeGt EllinghamLP037008Residential

Land, water & Soil resources The site is situated upon grade 3 agricultural land adjacent to the settlement boundary and within groundwater source protection zone 3. The site is designated public open space. The 2014 SHLAA indicated that the proposed site is situated upon designated public open space. The SA indicated that the site would lead to a loss of open space and that the site is adjacent to the settlement boundary.

Interim Conclusion: Although the site is designated as public open space this would not rule out development on this site and at this stage the site is considered to be ‘Developable’

Reasonable AlternativeGt EllinghamLP037010Residential

Land, water & Soil resources:The site is an existing residential and garden site in a grade 2 agricultural zone. Development of the site would also have an impact upon the aquifer. The site is considered brownfield

The 2014 SHLAA considered the site to be ‘deliverable’. The SA scores neutral with the site adjacent to the settlement boundary and opposite a linear development pattern. Interim Conclusion: ‘Deliverable’.

Reasonable AlternativeGt EllinghamLP037009Residential

Land, water & Soil resources: The site is situated upon agricultural land grade 2.

Development of the site would also have an impact upon the aquifer. Climate Change: The site is adjacent to the settlement boundary. Economic activity: Access to road network and facilities Adjacent to settlement boundary. The 2014 SHLAA considered the site to be deliverable. The SA indicates that the site is situated upon agricultural land and adjacent to the settlement boundary. Development could link into other sites proposed. Interim conclusion , the site at this stage is considered ‘Deliverable’, though consideration would have to be given to the appropriate level of development and whether the site should be brought forward in part and or with others

Reasonable AlternativeGt EllinghamLP037011Residential

Land, water & Soil resources: The site is situated upon Grade 3 agricultural land. The site is also situated within groundwater source protection zone 3. The site lies adjacent to the settlement boundary, is part brownfield and wooded. The 2014 SHLAA indicated that there is a lack of access to the site and is therefore ‘non-deliverable’. Further highways comments indicate a potential unsuitable access and inadequate road network.

Interim Conclusion: ‘Unreasonable’.

Unreasonable AlternativeGt EllinghamLP037012Residential

Land, water & Soil resources: The site is situated upon agricultural land grade 3. Climate change and air pollution The site adjoins the settlement boundary and is a continuation of the built form . Inclusive communities/ economic development Site improves choice and access to facilities The 2014 SHLAA determined this site to be ‘deliverable’.The SA indicated that the land was distant from key facilities ; however, development here would be a continuation of the built form. Interim Conclusion: ‘Deliverable’.

Reasonable AlternativeGt EllinghamLP037013Residential

Land, water & Soil resources:The site is situated upon agricultural land grade 3 Development of the site would also have an impact upon the aquifer.

The site is adjacent to the settlement boundary and existing residential development that is outside that boundary The 2014 SHLAA considered the site to be ‘deliverable’. The SA concluded neutral, the site is on Greenfield and adjacent to the settlement boundary however is central.

Interim conclusion: ‘Unreasonable’.

Unreasonable AlternativeGt EllinghamLP037015Residential

Land, water & Soil resources:The site is situated upon agricultural land grade 3 Development of the site would also have an impact upon the aquifer. The site is adjacent to the settlement boundary and existing residential development that is outside that boundary. The 2014 SHLAA considered the site to be ‘deliverable’. The SA concluded neutral, the site is on Greenfield and adjacent to the settlement boundary however is central. Interim Conclusion: It is considered that the site is ‘Deliverable’.

Reasonable AlternativeGt EllinghamLP037016Residential

Land, water & Soil resources: The site is situated upon agricultural land grade 2. Development of the site would also have an impact upon the aquifer. Climate Change: The site is adjacent to the settlement boundary. Economic activity: Access to road network and facilities Adjacent to settlement boundary. The 2014 SHLAA considered that a larger site to be ‘non-deliverable’ due to the size of the development proposed. The SA indicates that the site is situated upon agricultural land and adjacent to the settlement boundary. Development could link into other sites proposed

Interim Conclusion: The site at this stage is considered ‘Deliverable’, though consideration would have to be given to the appropriate level of development and whether the site should be brought forward in part.

Reasonable AlternativeGt EllinghamLP037017Residential

Land, water & Soil resources: The site is situated upon agricultural land grade 2 Development of the site would also have an impact upon the aquifer. Climate Change: The site is adjacent to the settlement boundary but removed from the immediate built form, though development of adjacent sites would change this. Economic activity: Access to road network and facilities Adjacent to settlement boundary. The 2014 SHLAA considered that a larger site to be ‘non-deliverable’ due to the size of the development proposed. The SA indicates that the site is situated upon agricultural land and although adjacent to the settlement boundary is removed from the centre of the settlement with agricultural land in-between,

Interim Conclusion: The site should be considered in relation to other sites proposed and at this stage is considered ‘Deliverable’, though consideration would have to be given to the appropriate level of development and whether the site should be brought forward in part

Reasonable AlternativeGt EllinghamLP037018Residential

Land, water & Soil resources:The site is situated upon agricultural land grade 3. Development of the site would also have an impact upon the aquifer. The 2015 SHLAA indicated that the site is considered to be ‘non-deliverable’ due to lack of access to the site.

The SA concluded neutrally. the site could be delivered only in conjunction with LP037019, which is considered to be ‘deliverable’ . Interim consultation: It is considered that this site is ‘Developable’. Though consideration would have to be given to scale and appropriate level of development for the settlement.

Reasonable AlternativeGt EllinghamLP037019Residential

Land, water & Soil resources:The site is situated upon grade 2 &3 agricultural land, with the potential to impact upon the aquifer. Climate change and air pollution: The site adjoins the settlement boundary and another smaller site. The 2014 SHLAA considered the site to be ‘deliverable’. The SA concluded neural, being Greenfield land grade 2/3 and potential impact upon the aquifer. The site is a large site, which on its own may not be suitable in policies terms and any development would have to consider the wider landscape impacts and considerations. Interim Conclusion: It is considered that the site is ‘Deliverable’ and is an option whole / part site for development.

Reasonable AlternativeGt EllinghamLP037020Residential

Land, water & Soil resources: The site is situated upon agricultural land grade 2. Development of the site would also have an impact upon the aquifer. Climate Change: The site is separated from the settlement boundary by one field.

The 2014 SHLAA considered that a larger site to be ‘non-deliverable’ due to the size of the development proposed. The SA indicates that the site is situated upon agricultural land and separated from the settlement boundary. Development / access would be dependent on other sites coming forward

Interim Conclusion: The site at this stage is considered ‘Deliverable’, though consideration would have to be given to access ans scale along with the appropriate level of development.

Reasonable Alternative

Fire-safety tips for property developers

Fire-safety Tips For Property Developers

When designing and planning a property development project, it is essential to consider the legal health and safety requirements. The government outlines many clauses that are specifically related to fire safety. Following the correct framework of regulations is pivotal when protecting future tenants or occupiers and neighbouring properties from fire risks.

From the initial construction blueprints to the final fittings and fixtures, here are the things property developers must keep in mind throughout the course of a development project. Working with the correct materials It is essential to assess the internal and external structure of a property, in order to gauge its ability to resist and control the rapid spread of smoke and fire. Fires do not usually start in two different places within a property, so being able to contain a fire to its starting point increases safety measures. The choice of particular materials for lining partitions, walls, ceilings and other internal parts of a property s structure can significantly affect the spread and growth of a fire. Choosing unsuitable materials may prevent occupants from escaping from the property in the case of a fire; therefore, property developers must use materials that are proven to: Efficiently resist the spread of flame over their surfaces; If ignited, have a rate of heat release or rate of fire growth that is adequately low within the circumstances. Protecting a property s structure As well as safeguarding the internal structure of a property, the overall structure must also be protected. The method of compartmentation is designed to divide the property into separate cells using suitable construction materials that help to prevent the passage of fire by walls and the roof. This ensures that the property s structure does not easily collapse during a fire and that any neighbouring buildings, apartments or shops are not affected by the fire. Fire-doors and walls are the most common forms of compartmentation, which are essential in commercial buildings and apartment blocks, to prevent the passage of fire into a stairwell.

Occupiers need to be able to safely exit a property in the case of a fire, so mapping out and protecting the exit route during the development of a building is pivotal. Cavity barriers are another form of fire separation these are necessary in vulnerable, out-of-sight places (like some concealed floor spaces, roof spaces and ceilings), to prevent the spread of smoke and fire from going unnoticed. Fitting alarms and fixtures Once a property has been built, there are numerous fire safety fixtures you can fit. Legally, you will need to make sure that there is: A smoke alarm on every storey; A carbon monoxide detector in every room that contains a fuel-burning appliance (i.e. boilers, cookers, fireplaces, and gas heaters). Depending on the nature of the property, it may also be necessary to fit a flame curtain. Flame curtains are automatically activated by a fire alarm or power failure, dividing up large open spaces within a building to efficiently help slow down the spread of fire, allowing occupiers a safe exit route. In a similar way, fire shutters are designed to create a fire-resistant barrier, which is an ideal addition to a commercial property development or high-rise residential property. Shutters can be installed across large window spaces, doorways or halls, such as shopfronts, garages and stairwells.

Both flame curtains and fire shutters should be certified to BS476 or BS EN 1634 standards, to ensure maximum safety. Automatic fire-suppression systems, in the form of fire sprinklers and gaseous fire suppression systems, are also an important addition to commercial buildings and communal areas in apartments. These can help to extinguish a fire in the early stages, not only increasing the safety of occupiers but also aiming to protect the structure of the building itself so that it can continue to function under minimal repairs after a fire. As a property developer you have numerous responsibilities when it comes to implementing fire-safety precautions and best practices. From choosing suitable internal linings for a property to constructing a solid structure that prevents fire spread, and finally fitting the necessary fixtures, a new property development must adhere to the government s legal guidelines. Free download covering legal requirements for responsible persons under the FSO, courtesy of the IOSH, BIFM and USHA approved UK provider of health, safety and environmental information. Key features: A full breakdown of the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 The key actions when dealing with fire precautions & protection A complete guide to maintaining procedures and requirements within your organisation.

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Smart buildings case study: 240 Blackfriars, London download

Smart Buildings Case Study: 240 Blackfriars, London Download

When UBM London relocated to new premises a few yards down the road from their current office, they were moving light years away in terms of technology. In moving to 240 Blackfriars, a 19 storey tower completed in 2015, the company which organises IFSEC International and publishes this website they sought to reshape working culture and automate and integrate building technologies for a smarter building environment. Download this smart buildings case study, which is part of the Protecting London series, to find out more about cloud-based booking systems, water-saving devices, solar-controlled blinds, access-card-controlled lockers, cashless vending, desk-booking systems and other automated or smart technologies.

This case study features insights from 240 s head of facilities management, Stephen Vause, Euroworkspace MD Adrian Cowley and head of PMO (project management office) David Self.

Complete the form to download the whitepaper.