building

Dates announced for tall building fire safety events

FIRE EVENT The recent fires in Grenfell Tower (London) and The Torch (Dubai) have highlighted the need for improvements in tall building design, construction, management and firefighting. The Tall Building Fire Safety Network, which offers regular courses and conferences on tall building fire safety management in locations around the world, has announced a full schedule of events for 2017/18. The 5th International Tall Building Fire Safety Conference will take place between 19 21 June 2018 at Excel London alongside the FIREX International exhibition.

Day one will consider design and fire engineering in tall buildings, including fire testing of cladding systems; day two, management and insurance of fire risk in tall buildings, including construction and refurbishment; while the last day will consider firefighting in tall buildings. This will be followed on 22 June by a Tall Building Firefighting Summit . The objective of this Summit is to bring together fire chiefs and firefighters from around the world to discuss and challenge the current state of the art with regard to tall building firefighting. The event will be free to serving firefighters and seek to develop the next generation of firefighting procedures for tall buildings. Meanwhile, the next Institution of Fire Engineers Recognised Tall Building Fire Safety Management Course will take place at The Shard, London, UK between 11-15 Dec 2017. Other dates in the UK: 15-19 January 2018, Birmingham 19-23 February 2018, London 19-23 March 2018, Manchester 21-25 May 2018, London And in Australia: 9-13 October 2017, Perth 16-20 October 2017, Melbourne 23-27 October 2017, Sydney The Tall Building Fire Safety Management Training Course is packed with useful tools and techniques for those tasked with management. Training will address the issues raised by the Grenfell Tower fire. Instructors on the course are experts in their field and come with a wealth of knowledge and experience. Delivered over five days in existing Tall Buildings, the course covers a wide syllabus of relevant topics and case studies including: Prevention, including; case studies, fire risk assessment, management systems Detection and Alarm, cause and effect, maintenance, degraded systems, false alarms Escape, evacuation strategies, lifts, disabled escape, wayfinding, car parks Containment, passive barriers, steel protection, sprinklers, construction work Firefighting, fire statistics, fire growth, firefighting techniques, wind driven fires The course is ideal for anyone who has a responsibility for managing fire safety in a tall building, including high rise residential, hotels, business and office blocks and mixed use.

For further information on the courses or to book, please email Russ Timpson: [email protected]

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Fire assembly points: 5 things you should know

The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 states that emergency routes and exits must lead as directly as possible to a place of safety and that procedures for serious and imminent danger must enable the persons concerned to immediately proceed to a place of safety in the event of their being exposed to serious, imminent and unavoidable danger . So what do you need to remember about fire assembly points to keep your staff safe in the event of a fire? Here s our top five points to keep in mind: Assembly points outside of the building should be clearly indicated .

These points will be designated in consultation with your fire risk assessment, and the routes to them should be signposted with correct notices. Ensure all signage is unobstructed and easy to see, and that staff are aware on joining the company where their designated fire assembly point is. For larger sites, a well-formulated procedure should be in place to handle the evacuation of hundreds of people safely, ensuring they are moved through various exit points to a single assembly point. Where assembly points are sited is important . Consideration needs to be given to distance from the main building, and ease of accessibility by disabled people. Providing a sheltered, illuminated assembly point can be a good idea depending on the type of people who would be evacuated. For example, a care home may have vulnerable people who would benefit from shelter in the event of forced evacuation in poor weather. It is important that employees and other persons visiting the building are advised which assembly area they must use in the event of evacuation . For employees, this should form part of their induction to the company.

For visitors, it is good housekeeping to advise where the nearest exit points and assembly point is. Having a well-thought out fire safety evacuation policy is of upmost importance in ensuring the safety of your employees and site visitors. A comprehensive fire-risk assessment will look at your existing evacuation procedures, ensuring you comply with the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order. If you have an existing fire risk assessment, this should be reviewed every 12 months, and a new one should be completed every three years. For new sites, you should have a fire risk assessment completed within 3 weeks of opening. Not had a fire-risk assessment completed recently? Simply contact us for a quick quote .

Fire-door safety campaigners renew calls for public register of responsible persons

Fire news The organisations behind Fire Door Safety Week have again called for a publicly available national register of responsible persons for fire safety in rented accommodation. The British Woodworking Federation (BWF), BWF-Certifire and the Fire Door Inspection Scheme also called for such a register, which would require individuals with legal responsibility for a building s fire safety to be registered on a national database, in October 2016. Their name and contact details would be prominently displayed in the building so tenants had a point of contact for reporting any concerns or problems.

The organisations also want the responsible person to sign a formal acknowledgement of duty of care and meet a mandatory minimum level of competence. The notion of a responsible person was introduced by the Regulatory Reform Fire Safety Order (2005). Defined as the person with ultimate responsibility for fire safety in a specific building, the responsible person, the act stated, should be the the employer, occupier or owner of the building. The responsible person must: Ensure that a fire safety risk assessment is carried out and reviewed regularly Identify and record fire hazards Identify and record people at risk Evaluate, remove or mitigate fire safety risks Prepare an emergency plan and provide training Regularly review and update the fire risk assessment Mystery identity However, the organisers of Fire Door Safety Week believe that the effectiveness of the responsible person framework is compromised by the fact that their identity is often not clear to the building occupants. When we start digging, the identity of the responsible person is often a mystery, says Hannah Mansell, spokesperson for Fire Door Safety Week. It can become very complex trying to identify who it is, especially in organisations that own or manage vast housing stock. Although the Fire Safety Order took effect over 10 years ago, our research shows that tenants don t know who to report fire safety concerns to. Even worse, when we surveyed those who are responsible for fire safety, half of them didn t even know or were unclear about their role. Mansell, who is also BWF technical manager, chair of the Passive Fire Protection Forum and a trustee of the Children s Burns Trust, continues: Under the Fire Safety Order, Responsible Persons have to ensure that a regular fire risk assessment (FRA) is carried out by a competent person and is documented.

By identifying the responsible person and providing their contact details, occupants become empowered to report any concerns they have about the fire doors in their buildings. Hannah Mansell, technical manager, BWF The FRA should examine all aspects of fire safety management, including active and passive fire protection measures, signage, means of escape and the specific fire plan procedures. Their responsibilities also include acting on improvement advice and creating the emergency fire plan for the building, the key to this is arming the occupants with the knowledge of what to do in an emergency. Where in-depth and expert knowledge is lacking, the responsible person has a duty to engage someone with the relevant expertise to be able to implement or advise on key areas. There needs to be crystal clarity about the Responsible Person and a total transformation of attitude towards fire safety of tenants in rented accommodation. By identifying the responsible person and providing their contact details, occupants become empowered to report any concerns they have about the fire doors in their buildings. This would also ensure that those responsible for keeping tenants safe from fire know their duty and are made aware of issues directly. The call for a register of responsible persons was first made following the inquest into the death of Sophie Rosser, 23, who died in 2012 following a fire in her block of flats in London. At her inquest, the coroner was unable to pin the blame on any specific person or organisation.

Research commissioned by Fire Door Safety Week last year suggested that the poorest in society are by far at the greatest risk of fire. The recent fire at Grenfell Tower has certainly vindicated this. Fire Door Safety Week will run from 25 September to 1 October. Now in its fifth year, it aims to raise awareness about the role of third-party certificated fire doors in preventing life changing injuries and the legal responsibilities of managing fire door safety. It will focus on promoting awareness of the critical role of fire doors in high rise buildings, houses of multiple occupancy and other types of shared accommodation. The campaign will be giving advice, hosting events and sharing useful resources. It will also be signposting tenants as to where they should be reporting their fire safety concerns.

The campaign has received backing from fire and rescue services, housing associations, charities, BWF members, fire safety professionals and a wide range of other organisations.

How to develop a fire-risk management strategy

Where fire is concerned, honesty is the best policy, strategy and procedure. That was the message in an article I authored last year which focused on the importance of fire policy. What amounts to fire policy, fire risk management strategy and procedure is not thoroughly understood and many people responsible for fire safety within organisations or individual buildings struggle to get it right.

Following the release of BS 9999: 2017, which contains a revised section 4 entitled Designing for the management of fire risk , I thought it might be worthwhile sharing some thoughts on how to craft fire risk management strategy. In this article I ll answer the following questions: What is a fire risk management strategy? Why it is useful to have one? Who might be tasked with developing one? When might one be required? How should it be structured? What is a fire risk management strategy? As the title would suggest a fire risk management strategy is focused towards the management of fire risk. There are some subtle differences between a fire strategy and a fire risk management strategy.

A fire strategy report describes the fire safety issues and how they are addressed. It acts as a guide for the design team, by identifying standards or setting performance criteria eg for the capacity of a smoke extract system and/or the fire resistance of elements of structure. It is the basis of the submission to the approving authorities ie building control body and fire authority. A concept fire strategy report will evolve through the design process being refined and expanded as the project progresses with a view to becoming an as-built fire strategy for use throughout the building s life cycle. The term fire-risk management strategy was defined in PAS 7: 2013 as a document which defines an organisations fire risk management system and method of implementing the overarching policy . A fire risk management strategy can be developed for an organisation responsible for a single building or an organisation with responsibility for a multi-site portfolio. Why it is useful to have one? When designing fire risk management into buildings there is great benefit in providing building occupiers and/or their person designated with fire safety responsibilities ie fire, health and safety managers with the opportunity to become involved with the design and construction process thus ensuring improved operational performance and better working environments. There are also ongoing business benefits.

The maintenance and operational costs of a building during its lifecycle far outweigh the original capital cost of construction, and these could potentially be explored and relayed by the fire engineer. Benefits of incorporating fire risk management into the building s fire strategy The key benefits can be identified as: Involvement at an early stage of building, managers and end users or their fire safety/health and safety managers allowing for early challenges of the practical implications of design concepts in terms of how they may impact upon on-going day to day practicalities, maintenance and operational costs pertaining to the fire strategy. Ensuring that full training, commissioning and handover is provided at an early stage, which reduces the cost of a protracted handover and means the building will reach optimal performance sooner. Allowing for post occupancy evaluation, which monitors the project outcomes post completion against performance and cost criteria, and ensures lessons are learned for future projects. When might one be required? A fire risk management strategy may be developed by someone designing new buildings or it may be developed as part of organisations fire risk management system documentation. At the design stage, a fire strategy report will usually contain some commentary on management, for example; where it has been necessary to make assumptions regarding the management of the building in the development of the fire strategy these should be stated in the fire strategy report. The fire strategy report may incorporate more comprehensive commentary on fire risk management, for example; if variations from the national guidance are proposed and justified with the use of fire engineering analysis or simply as the fire strategy report evolves through the design process into an as built fire strategy and more information on the use and management of the building comes to light. A fire risk management strategy for a single building may remain incorporated within the fire strategy report or become a separate document.

If a fire risk management strategy is drafted for an organisation operating a portfolio of buildings it is preferable for it to be a separate document. A fire-risk management strategy can also be developed post occupation. The standard Scope of Works for the Fire Engineer produced by the Fire Industry Association and Fire Engineering Council sets out the following services at RIBA Stage 7 Use and aftercare (previously RIBA stage L). These services are to produce, or assist in the production, of organisational fire risk management policy, strategy and procedure. Moreover, organisations seeking to achieve a high level of assurance and management system level 1, as defined in BS 9999: 2017 can demonstrate this by conformity to PAS 7. In order to demonstrate attainment of a level 1 management system some organisations may decide to have their management system certificated. Who might have cause to develop or review one? There may be a number of professionals with interest in the development of a fire risk management strategy. The interested parties could range from fire safety professionals i.e.

designers, fire engineers and fire safety managers, or owners, tenants, occupants, facility managers, health and safety managers and security staff. There may be a number of professionals with an interest in reviewing a fire risk management strategy and these could include: regulators and enforcers, including building control bodies, fire authorities, health and safety inspectors, environmental health officers, and environmental agencies. There may also be third party certification bodies with an interest in certificating a fire risk management system may wish to assess any claim of conformity against PAS 7. A claim of conformity can be made on the basis of: a) a first ‘party conformity assessment performed by the organization itself (self ‘assessment); b) a second ‘party conformity assessment performed by, for example; a trade association; or c) a third ‘party conformity assessment performed by an organization, such as a certification body, that is independent of both the organization responsible for the fire risk management system and, for example; a trade association. Guidelines for auditing management systems are given in BS EN ISO 19011. Requirements for bodies providing audit and certification of management systems are given in BS EN ISO/IEC 17021-1. How should it be structured? PAS 7 imposes a requirement that the organisation shall define and document its fire risk management strategy in order to implement and maintain procedures that identify the aspects of its activities, products and services relevant to the scope. By considering the context of the organisation it is possible to evaluate the risks to the organizsation by determining and recording those aspects that can have a significant impact on life safety, property protection, business continuity and the environment, as dictated by the organisation s policy.

The fire risk management strategy shall address the following seven factors of strategic fire risk management: Fire risk assessment Resources and authority Fire safety training Control of work on site Maintenance and testing Communication Emergency planning Michael Porter once said: Strategy is about making choices, trade-offs; it s about deliberately choosing to be different . In many ways this is true of a fire risk management strategy. A strategic fire risk management approach can be defined as an integrated or holistic approach to understanding and managing risks posed by the threat of fire that enables an organisation to optimise its underlying processes and achieve more efficient results. In our experience, no two organisations have the same strategy even if they are in the same sector. The benefits of establishing effective fire risk management strategy are clearly demonstrable, being able to align the nuances of fire risk management into the broader auspices of safety/quality management. This is particularly useful for organisations standardising approaches within other disciplines such as: health and safety, environmental protection, business continuity, security and quality systems. BB7 is offering a free gap analysis against the requirements of PAS 7: 2013 Fire Risk Management System Specification.

They are particularly interested in hearing from organisations with complex fire risk management challenges.

Nedap previews IFSEC 2017: vehicle identification, mobile access and more

Nedap has a big focus on mobile access at IFSEC 2017. Mainland Europe is well presented at the trade and Nedap Identification Systems uses the show to launch new products and new innovations. To preview IFSEC 2017, we asked Maarten Mijwaart, general manager of Nedap Identification Systems, what he expects from Nedap at IFSEC 2017.

IFSEC Global: What solutions and products will Nedap be demonstrating this year? Maarten Mijwaart: This year we will demonstrate to the industry that we have invested significantly in further expanding and improving our portfolio of security products. A few examples are: Last year we introduced MACE, our platform for mobile access control. We have greatly improved the possibilities of the cloud based MACE Admin Portal. Virtual cards can now be easily distributed and also revoked by our partners or their end users. Virtual cards can be customized to reflect the corporate style of customers. And we can even authenticate the identity of the virtual card holder by using the fingerprint if that is stored in the phone operating system. Our uPASS product line of Rain RFID / UHF readers is expanded with uPASS Target, our best performing long range UHF reader for vehicle identification to date. The uPASS Target can now also be equipped with a second antenna to expand the reading area or to support an entry and exit lane with one reader.

We have also added new UHF tags to our portfolio. A UHF Rearview Mirror Tag that motorists can easily hang on their rear-view mirror. Additionally, EPC GEN2 V2 cards and windshield tags are available that support security enhancements based on AES encryption. Our TRANSIT Ultimate readers for high end vehicle and driver identification have been redesigned last year. This year we are focusing on improvements to optimize the overall performance and configurability of this market leading RFID reader. IG: Why should end users stop by at the Nedap booth this year? MM : We feel that many people are not aware of the benefits that our products can bring. Making security systems a little more convenient for people to use will greatly increase the support of people in organizations for the security systems that are implemented. Access control systems that slow down people or their vehicles often end up not being used in the best way possible, which decrease the security level of your organisation.

Security should not be in the way of people. Our solutions make security and convenience go hand in hand. In the building and outside the building. For people and for vehicles. IG: Why should system integrators consider working with Nedap and its products? MM : Well, for one because we understand the importance of our partner channel. We understand that they are the one that convert our products into solutions for their clients. That is why we try and make their lives as easy as possible. Our long range readers are engineered to support specific applications as good as possible.

We support many interfacing possibilities. Our products are documented well and are certified by radio authorities to be used in most countries in this world. Our partner portal makes a wealth of support material available and our free e-learning courses help you on your way quickly. And last but not least: our support staff and commercial staff are more than willing to lend you a helping hand when needed. Another reason is that we have a track record in providing high quality products. Our products are tested against competitive products regularly and almost always tend to be the preferred solution. And when we do get feedback on how to improve our products, we listen carefully and are able to implement these improvements without delay because our ability to do product developments and improvements ourselves. With our own team of engineers. We strive to be market leading.

We are constantly working on expanding and improving our portfolio. With only one simple reason: we d like to make sure that, in our field, we are the logical choice to work with. Now and in the future.

Visit Europe s only large-scale security event in 2017 IFSEC International is taking place at Excel London, 20 22 June 2017, here are 5 reasons you should attend: Exclusive hands-on access to over 10,000 brand new security solutions Network with over 27,000 security professionals Discounts of up to 30% exclusively for IFSEC 150 hours of seminars, workshops and keynote speeches A 1-2-1 meetings service to pre-book face to face meetings.

Time is running out, register now to avoid missing out

Paxton s award-winning door entry system Net2 on show at IFSEC

IFSEC 2017 UK developer of electronic IP access control and door entry equipment Paxton will be demonstrating the latest addition to its video door entry system, the Net2 Entry Touch panel, at IFSEC International. As it is the fifth year that the Net2 Entry system has been available Paxton hold a daily prize draw for customers on its stand, D850 at IFSEC at ExCel London, 20-22 June. Launched in March 2017, the new touch panel for the Net2 Entry system has features that include a 7-inch colour touch screen.

Personalisation options make it suitable for different site types. The product s stylish design and quality production has garnered Paxton two design awards, the 2017 iF DESIGN AWARD in the Building Technology category and the Red Dot: Product Design Award 2017. It has also been nominated for others this year. Paxton s CEO, Adam Stroud, will be speaking about trends within access control as part of the IFSEC Seminar programme, as part of Innovation Hour , at the Security Management Theatre at 12.00 on Tuesday 20 June. Gareth O Hara, Chief Sales Officer at Paxton, says: Net2 Entry was a completely new venture for Paxton in 2012, as we extended our reach from access control into the door entry market. We wanted to take our access control expertise and prior knowledge of related technologies and marry these with the needs of the door entry market, providing an intelligent and simple solution. Five years on Net2 Entry is one of the fastest growing product lines across all key markets. Paxton Group was recently ranked in the FT1000, the Financial Times compilation of Europe s fastest growing companies. Its CEO, Adam Stroud, meanwhile, made it into IFSEC Global s top 50 influencers for 2017.

Visitors to the stand will also be able to find out more about Paxton s security products and systems, including its access control system, Net2 and its building intelligence offering, Paxton10. Be one of the first to see the Net2 Entry Touch panel by visiting the Paxton stand (D850) at IFSEC International (20-22 June 2017, London ExCeL). Get your free badge now.

Visit Europe s only large-scale security event in 2017 IFSEC International is taking place at Excel London, 20 22 June 2017, here are 5 reasons you should attend: Exclusive hands-on access to over 10,000 brand new security solutions Network with over 27,000 security professionals Discounts of up to 30% exclusively for IFSEC 150 hours of seminars, workshops and keynote speeches A 1-2-1 meetings service to pre-book face to face meetings.

Time is running out, register now to avoid missing out

Fire doorsets: How do we know that the fire safety measures we put in place are compliant?

Gerda As a responsible person under the RR(FS)O, we want to know that the fire safety measures we put in place are compliant, perform and are durable. Furthermore we want to show that we have done our homework accordingly. This paper highlights how this can be achieved with the focus on fire doorsets.

Fire doorsets are an integral part of compartmentation in buildings. Legislation and guidance point towards designed and fully tested doorsets: Replacement with suitable, purpose-designed and tested doorset constructions is always preferable A fire doorset s function may differ dependent on the type of doorset. A flat entrance doorset will require different test standards to that of a cross corridor doorset. For the housing provider/specifier it is important to check the test report data be it fire resistance (EN1634-1/BS476 pt 22), smoke control (EN1634-3 / BS476 pt 31) security (PAS24 or similar with BS6375) , acoustics (EN ISO 10140-2) thermal insulation (EN ISO 10077) and so on. Performance tests Do ensure that the different performance tests correlate to the same design, composition and construction for the doorset. The installation of a fire doorset impacts on whether the doorset will actually perform as designed in the event of a fire. By choosing a certified installer, through a recognised body such as BM Trada, Firas, or LPCB and working with the manufacturer s instructions, this should ensure that the work is carried out properly. Assuming we have properly checked the fire doorset test report data and certification this can be logged. However, how do we verify and document that the installation is compliant?

Often at sign-off the work is complete and the finished item is visible only. Technology is now available with image based evidence for installation stages specific to a given doorset. This not only demonstrates compliance, it also provides an audit trail. Lower costs Under the RR(FS)O there is a requirement to maintain fire doorsets and ensure they are in good repair (section 38.1) The same technology can document on-going maintenance for the doorset as well as any unscheduled repairs needing to be carried out. This translates through to lower service provision costs for the building provider, whilst future-proofing the investment. Available to use with a smart enabled phone or tablet device it is entirely mobile with a downloadable app. Tailored to the specific doorset, it provides the DNA and full history of any changes or maintenance. Particularly beneficial in refurbishment, where doorset sizes and functionality may differ, all dimensions, components and important reference information is stored with that doorset s unique code and location. This assists the building provider in the fast identification and replacement of parts where needed all of which is a necessity for fire doorsets.

The Gerda G Smart system brings auditable compliance to all Gerda fire doorset ranges. It documents effective real-time installation and maintenance of fire doorsets and provides the DNA and life history of the doorset. We see that the fire safety measures fire doorsets can offer built-in compliance for asset management. FIREX International takes place between 20-22 June 2017 at London ExCeL. Gerda is exhibiting on stand E120. Get your free badge now. Visit FIREX International for cutting-edge solutions, essential knowledge and the ability to grow your business by getting direct access to the whole fire safety industry. It is the perfect place to get your product in front of thousands of buyers, across a multitude of featured areas. From the brand new Drone Zone, the ARC Village, ASFP Passive Protection Zone, the Engineers of Tomorrow competition and more, it s all under one roof so you ll never miss a beat.

Click here to register your place now to join us at London Excel on 20 22 June

London fire: Councils and social landlords have ignored our warnings for years

GRENFELL TOWER FIRE We have a right to be very angry at the news about Grenfell Tower. I regularly sit in meetings with fire safety professionals, and their fury and frustration at the inaction of local councils and social landlords is palpable. We have been warning about the risks of a fire like this for years.

What we need to get people to take notice is a huge fire in a tower block they say. Well, here it is. There is an endemic fire safety problem in this type of housing stock. I have walked around tower blocks documenting and filming the fire safety breaches. I ve seen flats without fire doors, no emergency lighting or signage on fire doors and escape routes, broken fire rated glass, wedged-open fire doors, poor fire stopping around service hatches that breach compartmentation, no smoke seals in fire doors, rubbish and combustible material left in the common areas, and no information displayed on the specific fire plan of the building. #Grenfell Tower floor plan. “Improved” high density layout means one set of stairs for 24 stories of 120 apartments. #LondonFire pic.twitter.com/MHV3adB5Q7 Mark Ashley (@themarkashley) June 14, 2017 Deaf ears But that information appears to fall on deaf ears. Action must be taken now to address these issues. Our hearts go out to the residents of Grenfell Tower, their neighbours, friends and families, and the extraordinarily brave fire fighters and medics who are continuing to deal with the emergency. And to every local council and housing association I say, you know what to do, take action today. The next one could be tomorrow.

More than half of all tenants (58%) and over 70% of lower income tenants have no idea who the Responsible Person is for the building where they live Research for Fire Door Safety Week last year underlines some of the problems, in particular showing that the poorest in society continue to be at greatest risk from fire, with lower income tenants more concerned about fire safety where they live, less informed about how to protect themselves, and less able to move away from perceived danger. Just a third (35%) of the lowest income households renting flats say they have been given information on the emergency fire plan for the building where they live, compared to 88% of tenants on incomes over 100,000 a year. Those on incomes of 25,000 or less are much less likely to feel completely safe from fire (27%) than those on incomes above 80,000 (44%). But two out of every nine (22%) households with incomes under 25,000 living in rented flats who have concerns over fire safety are unable to move because they can t afford to. More than half of all tenants (58%) and over 70% of lower income tenants have no idea who the Responsible Person is for the building where they live the person to whom they should usually report their fire safety concerns. And worryingly, 15% of all tenants living in blocks of flats who have got fire safety concerns have never reported those concerns to anyone at all. Visit FIREX International for cutting-edge solutions, essential knowledge and the ability to grow your business by getting direct access to the whole fire safety industry. It is the perfect place to get your product in front of thousands of buyers, across a multitude of featured areas. From the brand new Drone Zone, the ARC Village, ASFP Passive Protection Zone, the Engineers of Tomorrow competition and more, it s all under one roof so you ll never miss a beat.

Click here to register your place now to join us at London Excel on 20 22 June

Protecting your IP camera network

Layer 2: Vulnerability management best practices timely response and transparency Axis applies cyber-security best practices in the design, development and testing of our products to minimize the risk of flaws that could be exploited in an attack. When critical vulnerabilities are discovered we fix them promptly and issue security advisories. The result is your second layer of defense.

Best practices. As members of the Building Security In Maturity Model (BSIMM) we re continuously assessing, improving and applying best practices around cyber security. These include: Design and architectural reviews, Code reviews, Testing for known vulnerabilities Responsiveness and transparency. Occasionally a new critical vulnerability may be discovered. In such cases, we guarantee speedy response, transparency and free upgrades and patches: Layer 3: Learning and collaboration understanding and mitigating risks Because there s no one-size-fits-all solution to cyber crime, your third layer of defense is a good understanding of the threats you face, their potential costs and how to protect yourself. We share our knowledge of cyber risks and how to mitigate them in a number of tools and papers that will help you put effective safeguards in place: Download our e-book for an introduction to how you can improve your cyber health ten best practices for a healthy network The Axis Hardening Guide is a detailed hands-on guide for integrators and IT departments with concrete recommendations for system hardening. Visit the Axis product security website for up-to-date news and advisories as well as useful documentation.

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