brexit

British Safety Council chief: Grenfell should mark turning point in fire safety

The chief executive of the British Safety Council opened its annual conference this week by detailing the body s plans for the future, and his hopes for the sector. Mike Robinson said that a lot had happened in the world since the Council had met last year, including the start of the Brexit process, the general election this summer, the Grenfell Tower disaster, and the election of Donald Trump. Speaking on Grenfell, and following the Council s joint letter to the prime minister last summer on stopping deregulation, Robinson said personally about how the disaster, which happened near to its offices in Hammersmith.

He said: This tragic event had negatively impacted on many peoples lives. I can only hope that it marks a turning point for fire safety in high rise buildings. Brexit On Brexit, Robinson said it was still far from clear what would happen at the end of the process, but that it may actually have a positive for health and safety. He said: With the uncertainty around Brexit, it creates an environment where there is actually an opportunity to look at good safety management. Robinson also detailed concerns about the rising levels of personal debt, stating the the financial pressures of not only low-paid but medium paid workers in the country is a big issue. Council developments Speaking about the Council, Robinson said the roll-out of the mental health construction scheme, Mates in Mind, had an ambitious aim to reach two-thirds of the entire industry of 2.5 million workers, and had got off to a great start since its launch a few weeks ago. On setting up the Mumbai office, he said that the Council wants to have an impact in a country where there are still 48,000 deaths from work . Training was another key element for Robinson going foward, and he claimed to be annoying Microsoft by shifting away from PowerPoint and traditional presentation techniques to immersive technology which he hopes to bring next year to the Council s suite of certificates. Free Download: A Technical Guide to Fire Detection and Alarm Systems Fire legislation, which is written for the purpose of life safety, requires duty holders in non-domestic premises to assess fire risks and put in place arrangements for the prevention of fire and to protect people from fire when it occurs.

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Click here to download now Related Topics Securing UK borders: An examination of the implications of leaving the EU for UK border management Brexit boosts fire industry exports but raises costs and tightens margins Brexit: What are the security and resilience implications?

Hung parliament: Have Cameron and May s calamitous gambles imperilled UK border security?

Brexit fallout Cameron gambled, lost. May gambled, lost. Tory party beginning to look like a casino.

Tweeted by Dutch MEP Sophie in t Veld this is a pithily apt description of the Conservatives two big calls over Brexit. If David Cameron s fateful decision to announce a referendum on January 2013 has achieved one of its primary goals to siphon off support from UKIP then it did so, quite unexpectedly, at the expense of his own premiership. Having embraced the referendum result despite being (an admittedly coy) Remainer his successor, Theresa May, then used Brexit as a pretext to strengthen her majority in the House of Commons against what the commentariat had deemed the least electable Labour leader since Michael Foot. Now we have a hung parliament with a minority Conservative government propped up by 10 DUP MPs. Whatever your political leanings, few would disagree that the prospect of concluding negotiations smoothly have now receded. Whatever your political leanings, few would disagree that the prospect of concluding negotiations smoothly have now receded. We re already nearly three months into the already narrow two-year negotiating window, the Article 50 having been triggered on 29 March. As the FT writes this morning: Theresa May s folly in calling a general election and then losing her overall majority means that the UK is now in an even weaker negotiating position than when it started There are few words to describe the sheer irresponsibility of the prime minister in triggering Article 50 only to follow it by calling a needless general election. A hung parliament, or even an overall defeat, was always a foreseeable (as opposed to predicted) potential outcome.

It was the last thing a prudent politician should have done: there is now considerable uncertainty at the very point the UK needed certainty, as the Brexit talks are about to commence. Nick Clegg, who lost his Sheffield Hallam seat, has said that MPs will either need to find a cross-party consensus on a more moderate workable approach to Brexit or we will have to go back to the country maybe once or twice until one party wins a majority, which would devour much of the two-year negotiating window. It is impossible to exaggerate this morning how self-absorbed and adrift the UK looks to the rest of Europe I can t think of any example of a modern mature democracy putting itself in such a vulnerable position. Confusion at UK borders And if negotiations do fail, what does that mean for national security? The UK s trade tariff levels with Europe and the rest of the world would default to World Trade Organisation terms, triggering a rise in the price of imports, with agricultural goods being an eye-watering 30-40%. But with the UK Lacking its own schedule at the WTO, there could be confusion at UK borders over customs declarations. This is an issue explored in depth in a white paper published on IFSEC Global this week. The cost of replicating the European Arrest Warrant outside the EU is expected to substantially exceed (by a factor of four) the cost of operating the EU measure. Norway and Iceland have been trying to negotiate a form of EAW with the EU but this has taken 15 years and is still to be ratified by every member state.

From the London First report on Brexit and border security Commissioned by London First s Security & Resilience Network, the report examines the implications of leaving the EU for the management of the UK s borders. From Europol membership to the Schengen Information System, the UK is at risk of losing access to a plethora of collaborative tools, the report reveals. Securing UK borders: An examination of the implications of leaving the EU for UK border management , which is written by several experts in immigration and border security, European law, and security and resilience, also warns of: Confusion at the UK border as customs declarations slow down traffic. The Road Haulage Association has said there is a real danger of everything grinding to a halt Complexities of new visa arrangements: Questions must arise about the ability of Border Force to deal with the increased workload as well as the physical capacity of receiving airports and other points of entry Brexit could represent an opportunity to modernise current practice and technology and adopt best practices from elsewhere in the world to improve both border security and customer experience ahead of, or at, the border. A decade after New Labour s attempts to introduce identity cards were shelved the concept could reemerge. The need to reframe collaboration with the EU over information sharing as Britain exits Europol and loses access to Eurojust, SIS II, the European Arrest Warrant (EAW), the European Criminal Records Information System (ECRIS), the Pr m Decisions and the Passenger Name Records (PNR) The white paper follows an earlier report by the Security & Resilience Network that examined the Security and Resilience Implications of Brexit. The report was launched at a London First briefing on 7 June 2017 and distributed at the IFSEC International 2017 exhibition (20-22 June 2017), which includes for the first time the Borders and Infrastructure Expo. UBM, the organiser of IFSEC, sponsors this report. Get your free badge for IFSEC now.

Join other high-end security professionals at the launch of Borders & Infrastructure Expo In conjunction with Europe s most renowned security event , IFSEC International, B&I is addressing your critical needs for large scale security projects affecting national security, integrated systems, border protection and much more. You will have access to test the latest security innovations in; Physical & perimeter, Barriers & bollards, Command & control, Emergency response, Cyber solutions, Drones & UAVs, Transport security and much more. Click here to register your place now to join us at London Excel on 20 22 June 2017.

Securing UK borders: An examination of the implications of leaving the EU for UK border management

Recent tragic events in Manchester and London have, among other things, underscored the importance to national security of getting Brexit right. From Europol membership to the Schengen Information System, the UK is at risk of losing access to vital collaborative tools in a wide range of areas. This report, which was commissioned by London First s Security & Resilience Network, focuses on the implications of leaving the EU for the management of the UK s borders.

For effective management, the desire to have secure borders must be balanced against making it as easy as possible for international business to thrive and legitimate movement to occur. Finite resources can then be targeted effectively. The report considers how this can be achieved in a post-Brexit UK. It follows an earlier report by the Security & Resilience Network that examined the Security and Resilience Implications of Brexit. The report was launched at a London First briefing on 7 June 2017 and distributed at the IFSEC International 2017 exhibition (20-22 June 2017), which includes for the first time the Borders and Infrastructure Expo. UBM, the organiser of IFSEC, sponsors this report. Get your free badge for IFSEC now.

The authors of the report are: Alison Wakefield PhD, Senior Lecturer in Security Risk Management, University of Portsmouth Claire Bradley, European Law Monitor CIC Joe Connell, Director, Praemunitus Ltd Intelligence & Risk Consultants and Chairman, Association of Security Consultants John Vine CBE QPM, former Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration Robert Hall, Director, Security & Resilience Network, London First.

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Brexit boosts fire industry exports but raises costs and tightens margins

FIA Market Conditions Review The Brexit vote has had a mixed impact on the fire sector, the latest FIA Market Conditions Survey suggests. Canvassing the observations of hundreds employed in the UK fire-safety industry the latest instalment Wave 8 reveals both positive and negative effects of the plunging pound. Nearly four in five (78%) of respondents agreed that supplier costs have risen noticeably in the previous six months.

Prices are getting tighter with higher supplier costs and fuel increases, said one. Conversely, the weak pound is obviously beneficial for exporters and the survey results bear this out. In October 2016, four months after the referendum, only 1-2% of exporters said their businesses had grown substantially more in the last six months. Six months on this figure is 10-20 times higher, with 20% reporting strong growth. With the weak pound widely attributed to the economic shock of the vote to leave the EU apparently having beneficial and damaging effects, nearly one in two of those polled do not expect the overall impact of Brexit to be noticeably positive or negative. Slightly more thought it will be positive 30% than negative, at 20%. Around 50% said that they have had slightly more orders in the last six months, down from 56% last time but higher than April 2016 and October 2015, where that figure was around 45%. There also appears to be slightly more responders stating slightly less orders this time around around 15%, up from around 7% last time. The skills crisis in fire engineering has been a perennial issue in previous surveys and this one is no different.

Still a great concern over the skills levels of installers. Many installation companies are sub-contracting labour intensive work which is having a detrimental effect on system commissioning, said one responder. Said another: Too many unqualified people giving bad advice or not completing work correctly at a lower cost resulting in us either losing work or having to reduce our charges meaning we can t afford more training or more engineers. The FIA will be hoping their recent launch of new engineering qualifications in fire detection and design will see this complaint diminish in the coming years. Almost 70% of employers are willing to invest more time, and more money into their technicians if it lead to a nationally recognised qualification. FSEC Global recently caught up with FIA CEO Ian Moore about the FIA s new engineering qualifications, the innovations on show at FIREX 2017, his forthcoming talk at Europe s largest fire-safety show, and the need for a holistic approach to fire safety. Download the Market Conditions Survey to find out more. Visit FIREX International for cutting-edge solutions, essential knowledge and the ability to grow your business by getting direct access to the whole fire safety industry. It is the perfect place to get your product in front of thousands of buyers, across a multitude of featured areas.

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Good engineers are almost impossible to find

Good Engineers Are Almost Impossible To Find  : Recruitment Crisis Highlighted By FIA Survey

The shortage of engineers in the fire industry is as bad as ever, according to feedback gathered for the latest FIA Market Conditions Report. Several respondents to the FIA (Fire Industry Association) survey, which canvasses the views of businesses in the fire industry twice a year, reported ongoing problems with the recruitment of engineers. In line with other economic trends plunging sterling aside the effects of June s vote in favour of Brexit on the fire sector has apparently been less significant than may have been expected.

A decline in sales was reported, but this was only slight , according to FIA CEO Ian Moore, who commented on the findings during a recent webinar. The FIA, which works with the DIT (formerly UKTI) and BSi to promote and support its members exports overseas, also found that exporters were most likely to report that they had seen slightly more exports or that they had broadly stayed the same in the last six months. What happens after or even if the UK actually leaves the EU, obviously remains to be seen. Moore also noted the strong appetite for increasing training provision over the next six months. One figure from the fire industry who completed the survey said the recruitment problem was so bad that good engineers are still almost impossible to find on the open recruitment market. In our case, this seems to be particularly so in the M1 corridor. Noting that skilled labour is hard to find and comes with a premium, another respondent offered this prescription for remedying the problem: Companies should therefore look to the future and invest in apprenticeships and implement multi-skilled training programmes for existing engineers the results of which will improve customer experience while reducing project costs. Another of those polled noted a rise in wages, as well echoing the widespread sentiment about the skills shortage: Recruitment of engineers is becoming more difficult and salaries are higher so I take that as a sign of an upturn in the economy. Among other notable feedback from manufacturers and service providers was an observation about price pressure: Due to increased routes to market of fire vendors and increased number of installers quoting for fire jobs, price pressure is increasing across the board, this is reducing margins for distributers and installers alike and this creates an offset between profit requirements and the obvious need for training of installers.

Is the FIA aware of the pressure and are there plans to tackle this issue? Ian Moore agreed that the industry had a major role to play in combating the dearth of skilled talent. Speaking in the webinar he noted: We are not known as an industry by people leaving school or university that you d naturally go to, and we need to make sure that we raise our profile there is a problem right now, quite clearly, so we must change and invest . Right now, the training IS available, the apprenticeships ARE available, but we need to make sure that these are more taken up by everybody in the future, and this will solve this medium to long-term problem. In the webinar, Moore also discussed the merits of mandatory certification to improve the competence of engineers. Download the latest FIA Market Conditions Review and listen to the webinar in which FIA CEO Ian Moore discuss the results and their implications for the fire industry. Free download covering legal requirements for responsible persons under the FSO, courtesy of the IOSH, BIFM and USHA approved UK provider of health, safety and environmental information.

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