axis communications

Axis Communications opens new Experience Centre as it celebrates 20 years at the top

Video surveillance During a launch event Axis partners met with the senior management team and were invited to explore how the new centre in Luton, just outside London, operates. The event also coincided with the company s 20th anniversary. Martin Gren, co-founder of Axis Communications, opened the centre, along with Bodil Sonesson, the company s vice president of global sales.

Atul Rajput, regional director, Northern Europe led the toast. Rajput, who was one of the company s first employees, thanked partners for their collaboration over the last two decades. The Experience Centre takes end-users on a two-hour tour where they can experience Axis systems in different environments that simulate real issues. The tour is designed for small groups of people to allow in-depth discussion of challenges end-users might be facing. In the tour the Axis Camera Application Platform (ACAP) allows partners to solve specific customer problems by downloading third-party applications to Axis IP cameras and encoders. Typical problems include queue management, people counting and intrusion detection. The systems are all interactive. On passing through a gateway, an audio alert notifies participants that they are trespassing for example. In the most immersive part of the experience a dark room simulates challenging lighting conditions so that on leaving the room, participants are shown how Axis WDR cameras capture detailed images despite these conditions.

Other highlights include the networking centre, demonstrating Axis hardware and third-party switches, as well as the video management software control room, which uses a new user interface and can be integrated with access control and intercoms. Throughout the tour the emphasis is on applications, not simply products. End users and installers are encouraged to discuss security-related challenges they face, and explore how Axis technology could help resolve these.

How network video can support suicide prevention on the rail network

It describes some current suicide counter-measures and details the size of the challenge which the rail industry faces. This paper explains how IP network video can support existing measures in order to provide an effective overall suicide prevention solution. This paper does not attempt to find broader resolution to the questions around suicide and refrains from exploring the personal and tragic circumstances surrounding many of the individuals who find themselves attempting or committing this act.

Lucas Young Business development manager, transportation Axis Communications [email protected] Connect with me on LinkedIn

Physical security professionals: do you really need to care about cybersecurity too?

So we all know that cybersecurity is important. It s mentioned in the national news on almost a daily basis, whether it be about the government vulnerabilities, cyberterrorism, or major retailers letting criminals steal millions of customer s credit card details. But, like securing physical spaces, it s one of those things that only becomes newsworthy when it fails.

For a long time, physical security was strictly analog, and it s only connection to the IT network was at its end point. And therefore, those responsible for physical security didn t need to concern themselves with worrying about network security, while at the same time, the IT department didn t need to be concerned with any undue exposure from cameras etc. Game-changer Sure hacks have always occurred even in analogue systems (the prototypical breach through a baby monitor or garage door opener being well known examples). But now that IP-based security systems are becoming the norm, with all the associated benefits, both sides need to be aware that the game has changed. The challenge, as we see it, is that the physical security team and the IT team have, on the face of it, very different outlooks and priorities, and often don t really understand each other. Physical security is from Mars and the IT department is from Venus! Often it can simply be a language/jargon barrier, where neither side truly gets what the other one is talking about. But in many cases, it can also be more akin to a border dispute, or a custody battle for an unwanted child: the physical security team don t consider cybersecurity to be part of their job, and the IT department may not even be aware of the potential vulnerabilities from a variety of devices that appear to have no obvious users or owners. One phrase stuck in my head after a recent conversation about cybersecurity with a customer: We are glad Axis is thinking about this stuff, and it s interesting, but we are pretty relaxed about it right now, they said.

And if they haven t been attacked (or at least don t know if they have been attacked), then that response is often followed by Cybersecurity is something that the IT department is worried about I just have to make sure this building is secure. At the same time, when I have talked to the IT department, they have sometimes been unaware of the potential exposure of unsecured IP cameras. So, how do we, as an industry, get the physical security manager to take IT security seriously? And conversely, how do we help the IT security team to talk to their physical security colleagues in a language that they understand? Actually, it s not that complicated. The best way is to use the terminology that they are both familiar with: IT Team Physical Team Don t use default passwords, make them hard to guess and change them often Install decent locks and make sure the keys are hard to copy Make sure to have proper user management tools in place Don t give out more keys than you absolutely have to instead put in some access controls Make sure devices lock themselves if not being used Lock the doors! Detect network breaches Detect intruders Don t leave any backdoors open, just in case Don t prop open that fire escape just in case Put up a firewall around your network to stop people casually wandering in Put a fence up around your perimeter to stop people casually wandering in However, not all organisations and businesses are the same, and some already have good communication between these two departments, and a good awareness of the threats they need to tackle together. What I have seen is that organizations tend to fit into one of three broad categories depending on their understanding of the threat they face. From enterprise-level to small businesses: how cybersecurity approaches compare At the top are those whose brand, business or credibility is based around trust and security for example banks.

By and large, they place security very high up their list of priorities, be it physical or computer-related, and it is ingrained within their corporate culture. They are often cautious about embracing new technologies until they can be sure that their security won t be compromised. This is especially true of new devices being connected to their network, such as cameras, access control points, etc. So their IT departments are highly unlikely to allow any new IP-based equipment to be connected without ensuring they have been properly sourced, tested and set-up. Next there are those who are aware that they may be vulnerable to cyber-attacks, but may not have the specific expertise in-house to properly analyse their risks, nor how to mitigate them. However, they are at least willing to get advice, even if it s not a critical priority for them. These companies probably are the most at risk with enough complexity in their networks to make management a full-time job, but possibly without sufficient resources to properly police every device that gets connected. Lastly, there are those, usually smaller businesses, who have very little understanding of cybersecurity at all, and even less idea that devices such as cameras need to be properly secured before being connected to a network. They rarely have a full-time IT manager, let alone a person with sole responsibility for physical security.

For these businesses, a very simple, automated set-up is ideal, with all security being taken care of out of the box. For example, the Axis Companion provides cameras, recorders, memory cards and a video management system all in one package. Lessons from major camera hacks In the end, though, both the IT and physical security departments need to care about the problem enough to want to engage with each other, and not just pass the buck back and forth until an attack actually happens. So how to do that? Unfortunately, the case has already been made for us, on several recent occasions. It was only a few months ago, that the Mirai BotNet attack demonstrated how vulnerable IoT devices can be, how ubiquitous they are, and how these two facts make for a highly attractive opportunity for hackers. Over several months, cybercriminals infected multiple millions of devices, including IP cameras, DVRs, home routers, etc. Then, in September 2016, it was first used to run a massive DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) attack on the website of a prominent security journalist, KrebsOnSecurity.com. A month later, it was followed by the largest DDoS attack in history, going after Dyn.com, one of the key parts of the US internet backbone, upon which services such as Netflix, Spotify and Amazon rely.

Now, some may say that not being able to watch the latest episode of Orange is the New Black may not be a huge threat to Western civilization, but this just goes to show the potential of what can be done with physical security devices that haven t been properly hardened against cyber-attack. The majority of the devices infected had easy-to-guess default passwords that had never been changed or even worse, could not be changed at all. Or there were the devices with backdoors built into them to make it easier for the manufacturer to debug them during development, but were never closed again before production. In December 2016, 80 plus cameras from a major manufacturer were found to have backdoor accounts. A month later, it was reported in the Washington Post that for three days the Washington DC Police were unable to record video from their security cameras due to 70% of their storage devices being hacked. So, we know that this won t be the last time. The internet of things is currently an easy target, and even more so because there are very few human beings in the loop, so there is almost no-one to notice when an attack has occurred until too late. As the Mirai BotNet attack showed, an attack might not even directly affect the host, so there is even less chance of spotting an infection unless you are paying close attention. Attend IFSEC International 2017 to stay protected As systems and software become increasingly connected, the consequences of a cyber-attack become greater every day, with the average breach costing businesses up to $3.8 million, do not leave it until tomorrow to act.

Visit and see the latest product developments from leading suppliers, live hacking demonstrations, and education from the best in the industry, Cyber & IT Security at IFSEC is an area you can t afford to miss.

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Axis launches explosion-protected temperature alarm cameras: XF40-Q2901, XF60-Q2901 and XP40-Q1942

Critical national infrastructure AXIS XF60-Q2901 Axis Communications has launched three explosion-protected, temperature alarm and thermal network cameras for sensitive industrial areas: the XF40-Q2901, XF60-Q2901 and XP40-Q1942. Sectors/verticals Operators of industrial plants can monitor remote, inaccessible and sensitive areas for rapid incident response and protection of employees, machinery and critical industrial infrastructure. Features Fixed XF40-Q2901/XF60-Q2901 explosion-protected temperature alarm cameras Control and detect temperatures of equipment Identify pipe leaks Detect fire Monitor equipment Perimeter protection Visually inspect and verify functions and processes are running correctly Provide remote assistance with planned maintenance Pan/tilt XP40-Q1942 explosion-protected PT thermal network camera Detection of people in restricted areas and safety of personnel in hazardous areas Supports Electronic image stabilization, which greatly improves video quality in situations where a camera is subject to vibrations, providing smooth and comfortable live viewing Supports Axis Zipstream technology, which lowers bandwidth and storage requirements without compromising thermal imaging.

Integration Based on industry standards and open protocols, and protected in heavy-duty enclosure, the new cameras seamlessly integrate with existing Supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) architectures, complementing with thermal technology. Compliance Axis explosion-protected thermal cameras and temperature alarm cameras offer worldwide certifications, meaning that the cameras are compliant with specific country regulations across the globe. Axis Communications says Industrial plant operators have a tremendously difficult task, says Martina Lundh, global product manager for thermal and explosion-protected cameras at Axis Communications. They need to ensure efficiency and continuity in large-scale, critical industrial processes, while meeting all health, safety and environmental regulations, across multiple locations and, often, across huge areas. Our new cameras deliver critical real-time information, allowing for immediate incident response which can prove to be a life-saving benefit. Availability The new explosion-protected cameras will be available through Axis distribution channels in May 2017. About Axis Communications Market leader in network video and pioneer in driving the shift from analogue to digital video surveillance. Axis offers network video solutions for professional installations featuring products and solutions based on innovative, open technical platforms. AXIS Communications collaborates with more than 65,000 partners in 179 countries, has employees in more than 40 countries and distributors in 70 countries.

Check out the latest thermal cameras and other surveillance solutions from Axis Communications at IFSEC International, 20-22 June 2017, London ExCeL. You can find Axis on stand E1000. IFSEC is also launching Borders & Infrastructure Expo for its 2017 edition. Get your free badge now. Join other high-end security professionals at the launch of Borders & Infrastructure Expo In conjunction with Europe s most renowned security event , IFSEC International, B&I is addressing your critical needs for large scale security projects affecting national security, integrated systems, border protection and much more. You will have access to test the latest security innovations in; Physical & perimeter, Barriers & bollards, Command & control, Emergency response, Cyber solutions, Drones & UAVs, Transport security and much more. Click here to register your place now to join us at London Excel on 20 22 June 2017.

In what scenarios are thermal surveillance cameras the best choice?

Axis Communications speaks to Securitas

Low-light surveillance When is a thermal camera the best choice for a low-light surveillance scenario? This was the theme of an interview conducted with Jonas Bergstr m, business development manager at Securitas, by Axis Communications, which is a major partner of the manned guarding giant. Securitas regularly installs thermal cameras from Axis.

Axis Communications: What is the single greatest advantage of thermal cameras compared to optical cameras? Jonas Bergstr m: The absolute greatest advantage for us is that thermal cameras result in significantly fewer false alarms. This means our operators in the security operation center do not need to evaluate as many incoming alarm calls and therefore become significantly more time-efficient. For what installation scenarios are the thermal camera models most suited? JB: We primarily use thermal cameras in perimeter protection installations. An intelligent video application is integrated into the cameras and forms a virtual fence. If anybody or anything crosses this virtual line then an alarm call is sent to our security operation center (SOC). What have thermal cameras contributed in terms of savings for Securitas with the reduced number of alarm calls? JB: Securitas always aims to minimise the number of false alarms.

A minimum number of false alarms means that the operators can be more efficient when authentic alarm calls come in. In extreme cases, too many false alarms can affect an operator s attention and ability to identify authentic alarm calls. We estimate that the ratio of false alarms generated by intelligent video analysis in a thermal camera in relation to an optical camera is approximately 1 in 10. By keeping down the number of alarm calls per camera, each operator can handle more alarm events within a certain time frame. The result is major savings. embedded content Do you have an example of an installation where thermal cameras have been of great benefit and resulted in different types of savings for both the end customer and yourselves? JB: For a very large number of our customers, the implementation of thermal cameras, with intelligent video analysis connected to our security operation center (SOC), has resulted in major savings. The result has been reduced vandalism, interrupted and halted burglary attempts, reduced number of emergency call-outs from security guards and reduced use of operator time. AC: Why have you chosen to only use thermal cameras for perimeter monitoring?

JB: The number of alarm calls generated is significantly lower than when using optical cameras. Thermal cameras do not need extra lighting to be installed. Thermal cameras are not as sensitive to different weather conditions, such as snow, rain, fog, etc. We can cover a larger area with a smaller number of cameras. With thermal cameras we can detect movement in areas of vegetation. In this environment we would have greater difficulty in creating enough contrast in the image to generate an alarm. AC: At what distance from the camera can you detect people with a high degree of certainty? JB: It all depends on the camera model used, with regard to the focal length of the lens. At up to 200 meters, it is normally no problem to detect and generate an alarm for people or objects moving in the image.

AC: Based on your experience, are there any weather conditions that are particularly tough for thermal cameras? JB: Dense fog, very heavy snowfall and certain reflections from puddles of water may cause problems, even for a thermal camera. Our experience is that thermal cameras work considerably better than optical cameras in unfavorable weather conditions. AC: Are there any other conditions that make things difficult for thermal cameras? JB: Yes, vibration caused by an unstable mounting surface or a wind-sensitive mast is always a problem when working with alarms triggered based on intelligent video analysis. This primarily applies to long distances, because here even small vibration has a significant effect on the camera. However, Axis thermal cameras have built-in electronic image stabilisation (EIS) that helps in these conditions. You may also encounter problems even when the surroundings or backgrounds are the same temperature as an object in the image. This happens because a thermal camera cannot distinguish an object from its surroundings.

Exactly as with optical cameras, its surrounding environment affects the thermal camera. In general, the point is that a thermal camera is less affected by external factors than an optical camera. Check out the latest thermal cameras and other surveillance solutions from Axis Communications at IFSEC International, 20-22 June 2017, London ExCeL. You can find Axis on stand E1000. Get your free badge now. Visit Europe s leading security event in June 2017 Visit IFSEC International for exclusive access to every security product on the market, live product demonstrations and networking with thousands of security professionals. From access control and video surveillance to smart buildings, cyber, border control and so much more.

It is the perfect way to keep up to date, protect your business and enhance your career in the security industry.

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Total cost of ownership: are you really getting the best deal when it comes to CCTV?

Total Cost Of Ownership: Are You Really Getting The Best Deal When It Comes To CCTV?

Article written by Steven Kenny, business development manager for the A&E Programme at Axis Communications. A common misconception when purchasing almost any business solution is that the upfront cost will make up the sole, or at least a large majority, of a project s total outgoings. This is a dangerous way to approach a procurement decision, often leading to issues such as unexpected operating fees, product failure and worst of all, downtime.

For this reason, when calculating the total cost of a project or assessing a tender, it s extremely important that businesses analyse the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) to help make the most informed purchasing decision. In specific regards to network video, we define TCO as a selection of relevant costs associated with a video surveillance solution through its complete lifecycle . The important message here is this is in reference to the complete lifecycle, including the whole cost of acquisition, the entire operating cost and the total decommissioning cost. To understand the importance of TCO as a consideration within network video procurement, we developed an example large-scale city surveillance project, comprising of 1,500 outdoor cameras and an enterprise-class video management, network and storage solution. Our analysis discovered that 67% of the total cost came in the acquisition phase, 31% during operations and 2% in the decommissioning stage. Zipstream: less is more The surveillance industry is constantly under pressure to capture more and capture it in more detail and better quality than ever before. While the quality of camera resolution has advanced at a remarkable pace, businesses have struggled to cope with the associated large amounts of data storage requirements. As a leader in innovation for the sector, Axis released its very own compression technology, lowering bandwidth and storage requirements by an average of 50% for a typical 24/7 surveillance use case. In Axis original city surveillance project TCO estimations did not include the use of Zipstream, but the effect of utilising this within the project shows significant cost savings during the operational stage, a 3% reduction.

With the projected cost for large installations of this nature standing at $17,000,000, that 3% holds some weight, equating to a saving of $450,000, or $300 per camera. Maintenance beyond system installation Costs that can t afford to be overlooked are those associated with maintenance and repair. Playing a significant role within the operational stage of any TCO analysis, these totalled 5%, or $800,000 in our example project. Of course, this figure is totally dependent on the quality of the solution in place. The importance of product reliability is often underestimated when maintenance costs are taken into consideration, leading to unexpected outlay or an even more expensive burden system downtime. Axis products are designed for performance and reliability, enduring a rigorous testing process to ensure they can withstand extreme conditions. The quality of the solution was shown to have a significant impact on the project s TCO. If failure rates were increased by a factor of four within the city surveillance project, for example, the cost of system failure would jump from 5% to 13%; $800,000 to $2,300,000. Testimonials Here s what some of our customers had to say: We ve installed 4,500 cameras and haven t had a single problem We had a return rate of less than 2% in seven years Our blind testing revealed that Axis cameras have less than 1% failure rate, compared to cameras from other vendors which generally had a failure rate of between 4 and 5% The system has been operating for three years now and has maintained its original reliability and quality Greater insight, informed business decisions At Axis, we believe it is essential businesses invest in the quality of their surveillance projects but also in the time to conduct a thorough TCO analysis.

A solution with a low initial price point can often seem like an attractive offer, with the full costs attached to its operation not understood until months or years down the line. With due diligence applied, a TCO is an extremely useful tool when calculating projects or assessing tenders, providing visibility of an investment over the system s entire lifecycle. This helps to ensures a business has the correct intelligence in place to make an informed purchasing decision that will stand the test of time.

Download: The Video Surveillance Report 2016 This exclusive report covers the security needs of surveillance systems as shaped by the physical environment including: What do security professionals think about plug-and-play systems Challenges like low-light conditions or large spaces and the threats posed in various sectors Which cutting-edge features such as mobile access, PTZ smart controls or 4K resolution are most important to security professionals What are the most important factors driving upgrades and would end users consider an upgrade to HD analogue Download the full report here.

CCTV procurement infographic: How a Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) model can help you make better decisions

CCTV Procurement Infographic: How A Total Cost Of Ownership (TCO) Model Can Help You Make Better Decisions

Building a cost-effective video surveillance system isn t easy. There are many factors and ongoing costs to consider before you make procurement decisions. Axis Communications, one of the biggest, most respected names in video surveillance, has put together an infographic that distils some interesting insights from a new report from the company on measuring your total cost of ownership (TCO) when procuring CCTV systems.

Axis has compiled a comprehensive TCO study of a large-scale city surveillance system using 40 costs relating to different system components and stages. Scroll down to the infographic below. For more insights on this subject download the Axis report on measuring your total cost of ownership (TCO) when procuring CCTV systems.

Download: The Video Surveillance Report 2016 This exclusive report covers the security needs of surveillance systems as shaped by the physical environment including: What do security professionals think about plug-and-play systems Challenges like low-light conditions or large spaces and the threats posed in various sectors Which cutting-edge features such as mobile access, PTZ smart controls or 4K resolution are most important to security professionals What are the most important factors driving upgrades and would end users consider an upgrade to HD analogue Download the full report here.

Axis CEO Ray Mauritsson discusses Canon collaboration

Axis CEO Ray Mauritsson Discusses Canon Collaboration

Canon Inc and its subsidiary Axis Communications AB recently announced a major restructuring of their sales and marketing teams. The shake-up saw Axis assume responsibility for marketing Canon s entire portfolio of network video solutions in the EMEA region from 1 September and in North America from 1 October. Their collaboration has also been evident on the product development front, with the launch of the first network camera from Axis with Canon imaging technology, the AXIS Q1659.

IFSEC Global caught up with Axis Communications CEO Ray Mauritsson to find out more about the partnership between two heavyweights of the security and consumer photography worlds. IFSEC Global: In what other ways do you see Axis and Canon collaborating technology wise? Are Canon cameras going to benefit from Axis technology and vice versa? Will we see more interoperability between the two? Ray Mauritsson: AXIS Q1659 is the first network video surveillance camera that combines high-end professional-grade optics from Canon with the quality, reliability and performance of an Axis network camera. We will evaluate other types of collaboration and integration on a case by case basis. This will be based on customer requirements and the appropriateness of the relevant Canon technology to be used with Axis cameras. IG: What was the thinking behind the recent restructuring of marketing operations? RM: The change means that in Europe, the Middle East and Africa and in the US and Canada, Axis will assume responsibility for the marketing, sales and technical service of Canon s entire network video product portfolio.

This because the network video surveillance market continues to show huge potential. Axis is in an excellent position to include the sales of Canon network cameras to our broad product and solution portfolio. Our customers now can choose from a wider assortment while we continue to strengthen our solution offering. IG: What was the strategic thinking behind the Axis acquisition by Canon? RM: That is really a question for Canon to answer, but as Canon have publicly stated they see safety and security as a future growth area. They expect Axis to continue to as an independent entity within the Canon Group, to drive growth in this area. IG: What would your message to end users and installers be in terms of what the Canon relationship means? RM: Canon has a strong commitment to build a long-term presence as a leader in this industry for Axis. We will continue to grow and develop our solution offering.

That will benefit both our partners and end customers.

Download: The Video Surveillance Report 2016 This exclusive report covers the security needs of surveillance systems as shaped by the physical environment including: What do security professionals think about plug-and-play systems Challenges like low-light conditions or large spaces and the threats posed in various sectors Which cutting-edge features such as mobile access, PTZ smart controls or 4K resolution are most important to security professionals What are the most important factors driving upgrades and would end users consider an upgrade to HD analogue Download the full report here.