Communication

Security Products – Communication

Converged security management: The key to mitigating cybersecurity risks

Converged Security Management: The Key To Mitigating Cybersecurity Risks

The IoT revolution has come about thanks to falling component prices, global mobile device adoption, improvements in telecoms infrastructure and the rise of application programming interfaces (APIs). Unsecured and therefore vulnerable devices are now easily searchable through online vulnerability search engine Shodan, among many other means. A series of cyber-attacks targeting such devices as conduits to wider corporate networks has exposed the complacency of some manufacturers over cybersecurity.

The consequences of successful breaches the loss of sensitive data and potentially multi-million pound fines levied for breaches of the forthcoming Global Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) mean the issue is finally getting the attention it warrants. The arguably lower standards of security for consumer devices is a problem, as is the use of third-party suppliers who may not take security as seriously as they should. According to the Department of Homeland Security, this inter-connectedness of devices introduces cyber-physical technologies that connect cyber systems to physical systems, thereby removing the barrier between the cyber and physical worlds but the greater connectivity also expands the potential attack surface for malicious actors. Author bios James Willison BA MA MSyI James is founder of Unified Security Ltd and vice chair of the ASIS European Convergence/ESRM committee. James was awarded the Imbert Prize for an outstanding contribution to the Security Industry in 2011 for his work on convergence with ASIS Europe and the Information Security Awareness Forum. He has worked with BP, Loughborough University, Mitie TSM, the EU and AXIS Communications on convergence. He is an ISACA Academic Advocate and a member of the draft ASIS/ISACA/ISC(2) Security Awareness Standard Working Group. Unified Security Ltd provide consultancy to organisations on how to align their physical and information security functions. This encompasses security policy, common reporting processes, converged security risk assessment, training courses and white papers.

Sarb Sembhi CISM Sarb is CTO and CISO at Virtually Informed, and has previously been a CTO and CISO for the Noord Group. A former consultant in risk and security, Sarb has also worked with the London Chamber of Commerce and Industry Defence and Security Committee and its cybersecurity working group. Other roles have included president of the ISACA London Chapter, chair of ISACA International GRA Region 3 Sub-Committee, chair of ISACA International GRA Committee, ISSA UK Advisory Group member and InfoSecurity Magazine Editorial Group member. Sarb has also served on several security standards groups and speaks at risk and security events around the world. Sarb was shortlisted in IFSEC Global s Top 50 influencers in security & fire 2017: Cybersecurity.

l

Watch: Highlights from the Drone Zone 2017

IFseC 2017 The Drone Zone returned to IFSEC International in 2017 for the second time. Drones have applications in perimeter surveillance, intruder alerts, mobile CCTV, emergency communications networks, facilities surveillance, criminal tool prosecution, fire scene investigations and drone detection. Watch our highlights video from the Drone Zone, which took place within Borders & Infrastructure Expo at London ExCeL between 20-22 June 2017.

embedded content Free Download: Securing UK borders: An examination of the implications of leaving the EU for UK border management. Recent tragic events in Manchester and London have, among other things, underscored the importance to national security of getting Brexit right. This report considers the implications of leaving the EU for the management of the UK s borders and making it as easy as possible for international business to thrive and legitimate movement to occur in a post-Brexit UK.

Click here to download now

UK government issues cybersecurity guidelines for connected cars

Cyber The Department for Transport has published cybersecurity guidelines for manufacturers of smart or connected cars. Written with help from the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure, the principles implore everyone in the automotive supply chain to collaborate during the design process and over software upgrades and maintenance long after cars hit the road. The authorities are concerned about the prospect of older vehicles running outdated software.

As cars become increasingly automated and ultimately, driverless the stakes will rise. Last year ethical hackers managed to wrest control of a Tesla Model S while the car was moving and slam on the brakes (see how they did it in the video below). Attacks can even inject malicious code into the electronic control units (ECUs) and controller-area-network (CAN) bus, which control critical systems such as electric steering and braking. Mark Noctor, VP EMEA, Arxan Technologies The eight principles, which were launched by transport minister Lord Callanan, follow: Organisational security is owned, governed and promoted at board level Security risks are assessed and managed appropriately and proportionately, including those specific to the supply chain Organisations need product aftercare and incident response to ensure systems are secure over their lifetime All organisations, including sub-contractors, suppliers and potential 3rd parties, work together to enhance the security of the system Systems are designed using a defence-in-depth approach The security of all software is managed throughout its lifetime The storage and transmission of data is secure and can be controlled The system is designed to be resilient to attacks and respond appropriately when its defences or sensors fail embedded content Connecting to WiFi and external devices via Bluetooth, Modern cars are increasingly smart . The communications and entertainment systems are particularly vulnerable to attack, and can be reverse engineered to access the API libraries that facilitate data sharing between systems, says Mark Noctor, VP EMEA at Arxan Technologies. From here attacks can even inject malicious code into the electronic control units (ECUs) and controller-area-network (CAN) bus, which control critical systems such as electric steering and braking. Preventing application code from being accessed and tampered is one of the biggest priorities in protecting a connected vehicle, and it is encouraging to see the government s guidelines specifically list the ability to protect code and ensure its integrity as key principles. Manufacturers must deploy code hardening measures to prevent attackers from accessing their source code and removing vital data such as cryptographic keys which can be used to access other systems. Anti-tampering measures should be hidden in the code to alert them if the code has been changed, and prevent systems from starting if alterations are detected.

The government announced the Autonomous and Electric Vehicles Bill, which will allow innovation to flourish and ensure the next wave of self-driving technology is invented, designed and operated safely in the UK , during the Queens Speech in June. The outcome of recent efforts by the US government to engage with US automakers over the issue do not augur well. Asked by a Senate committee if they supported mandatory privacy and safety standards, executives from Google, General Motors, Delphi and Lyft were evasive. Free Download: the Cyber Security Crashcourse This report contains 40 slides packed with insight into the trends shaping the industry and how you can protect yourself. Eric Hansleman from 451 Research presents a rapid-fire overview of cyber security.

Click here to download now

Benchmark Innovation Awards 2017: winners revealed

Security tech Avigilon and Vanderbilt are among the winners of Benchmark Magazine s Innovation Awards 2017, which reward excellence across nine categories of physical security technology. Rigorously testing hardware and software under a range of conditions, Benchmark Magazine is akin to the Which Magazine of the physical security industry. Find out below which products won the accolades across nine categories.

Video Surveillance (Hardware): Hanwha Techwin Wisenet X Hanwha Techwin s new Wisenet X series harnesses the Wisenet V processing engine and delivers mainstream functionality with advanced features. The Taiwanese surveillance brand has added H.265 compression and the second generation of the WiseStream dynamic encoding engine, which reduces bandwidth consumption (and includes dynamic GOP). Wisenet X also boasts 150dB WDR (taking on four instead of two frames to balance out uneven lighting), gyro sensor-based image stabilisation, enhanced low light performance, dual slots for SD-based edge recording, advanced analytics functionality and WiFi set-up support. The Wisenet X camera range comprises two-and five-megapixel models as well as bullet, static dome, box and PTZ variants. The Wisenet X camera range is more than the sum total of its parts, which is what makes it an interesting proposition! Benchmark Magazine Find out more about the winning solution from Benchmark Magazine. Video Surveillance (Software): SeeTec Cayuga Infinity X The flagship VMS from SeeTec can add sector-specific extensions including logistics-ready integrations, ANPR and warehouse management. Cayuga S50X supports up to 50 cameras on a single server. S Cayuga S100 can accommodate up to 100 channels on two servers with basic video analytics, motion detection and advanced event management.

Cayuga Infinity supports unlimited devices and servers along with numerous video analytics options, while Cayuga Infinity X also adds failover recording and video wall management. An open platform solution, Cayuga Infinity X can integrate directly with more than 1,000 devices via direct integrations. ONVIF compliance makes possible additional integrations, which are simplified by smart drivers. Combines power with simplicity, and ticks all the boxes for those who want advanced security and site management. Benchmark Magazine Find out more about the winning solution from Benchmark Magazine. Access Control (Hardware): Inner Range Inception This browser-based access control system with integrated intruder alarm permits easy connectivity with a regular PC, smartphone or tablet. Inception, whose software is hosted on the controller unit, can operate as a standalone system and the browser-based interface means there is no software to install nor licensing costs. Inception supports up to 32 doors with readers for entry/exit and can monitor up to 512 detection points via its alarm monitoring functionality. There are universal inputs and outputs to accommodate not just CCTV monitoring, but lighting control, HVAC management, lift control and more besides too.

Delivers a high level of performance, whilst also retaining a good degree of simplicity. It is flexible enough for most access control needs, and the inclusion of alarm monitoring adds value for a wide range of sites. It also does all of this at a competitive price point. Benchmark Magazine Find out more about the winning solution from Benchmark Magazine. Access Control (Software): Vanderbilt ACT365 Vanderbilt inherited ACT365 when it acquired Access Control Technology Ltd in 2016 a shrewd move if this accolade is anything to go by. ACT365 combines access control with video management functionality with what Benchmark describes as a seamless integration . ACT365, which is cloud-based, can be used remotely via tablet or smartphone. In practice, therefore, the operator could communicate with a visitor, verify their identity and open the door remotely from a smartphone without being physically on site themselves. ACT365 creates a unified integrated system, delivering flexibility and control for business owners whilst also reducing the amount of required infrastructure and resources to protect a site.

Benchmark Magazine Find out more about the winning solution from Benchmark Magazine. Site Protection (Hardware): OPTEX RLS-2020S Hitherto the sole preserve of high-security applications in critical national infrastructure because they were costly and bulky laser detectors are now more accessible for a wider range of verticals thank to innovations like the RLS-2020S from Optex. The RLS-2020S can be used both outdoors and indoors and achieves a 20 x 20 metre detection range. Multiple set-up configurations mean that this laser detector can cope with a range of scenarios that traditional sensors struggle with. Laser-based sensors can accurately detect objects and map them using X and Y coordinates. When people or objects are detected, PTZ-enabled cameras can then pinpoint and track the intruders. The RLS-2020S laser detector makes the technology more accessible for mainstream applications, delivers a small and discreet cost-effective option and also provides an enhanced level of performance in terms of catch performance and reliability. Benchmark Magazine Find out more about the winning solution from Benchmark Magazine. Site Protection (Software): Texecom Connect Based on Texecom s graded Premier Elite security system, Texecom Connect is an automation platform that is based on the current control panel range.

Installers and integrators can offer Texecom Connect upgrades to customers with existing Premier Elite systems. The Premier Elite range supports the Ricochet, mesh-based wireless platform, which itself won a Benchmark Innovation Award. Ricochet technology permits flexible communication between wireless field devices and the control panel. The heart of any Texecom Connect system will be a professionally installed graded alarm system without any compromises or dumbing down to allow the smart functions to be realised. This is important as it adds value without reducing security or the role of the installer or integrator. Benchmark Magazine Find out more about the winning solution from Benchmark Magazine. Intelligent Systems: Avigilon Appearance Search Aviglon s Appearance Search technology applies deep learning techniques to identify and retrieve video footage relevant to an investigation or management of an ongoing event. For all the potential of big data, operators can readily get overwhelmed with the sheer volume of data generated by video analytics platforms. Avigilon s Appearance Search technology, which can be acessed via Avigilon s Control Center VMS software, scans many hours worth of recorded footage and swiftly identify relevant video data to track a person or vehicle.

It can quickly identify routes taken, previous visits and last-known locations. Avigilon s Appearance Search technology enhances the level of security at a site by enabling end users to quickly locate targets of interest, such as specific persons or vehicles, across an entire site. This capability can not only improve incident response times, but additionally makes post-event investigations simpler and more thorough. Benchmark Magazine Find out more about the winning solution from Benchmark Magazine. embedded content Business Intelligence: Genetec Retail Sense The Business Intelligence category represents the diversification of security tech into non-security disciplines. Through analytics functions like heat-mapping and queue management, analytics platforms like Genetec Retail Sense generate and interpret data to create insights that can generate operational efficiencies for businesses mostly in the retail sector. Providing analysis of footfall, bottlenecks and shopper behaviour, Genetec Retail Analytics and other solutions of its ilk can no longer be written off as a grudge purchase in the way that security systems often were. Through real-time insights generated in reports by Retail Sense, retailers can utilise the intelligence gathered, allowing them to better understand consumers, make informed decisions and increase both consumer engagement and in-store profitability. Benchmark Magazine Find out more about the winning solution from Benchmark Magazine.

Infrastructure: Secure Logiq HA Servers With beefed-up processing capabilities, Secure Logiq s HA range of analytics-optimised servers have been designed for enterprise customers. i7 Extreme edition processors increase substantially the clock speed achieved, helping it to meet the processing-heavy demands of modern analytics platforms. With advances in GPU technology bringing deep learning and video analytics to the fore, appropriate server hardware is increasingly key to optimal performance.

Getting it wrong can cause the system to crash, slow down or become unstable. With experience in the video surveillance industry, Secure Logiq realises the importance of the right balance between performance and reliability for security systems. Benchmark Magazine Find out more about the winning solution from Benchmark Magazine.

embedded content

The Axis Partner Showcase to return with integrated solutions from 35 vendors

Installers and integrators Axis Communications is inviting security installers and integrators to attend its Axis Partner Showcase event in October. Scheduled for 11 October 2017 in Manchester, the open day will showcase technologies from 35 vendors that integrate with Axis surveillance solutions. The products on show, which will encompass fields beyond security, will include the latest in retail analytics, behavioural analysis, hosted services and cybersecurity, among other areas.

Confirmed exhibitors include Morphean, Milestone Systems, Genetec and ASSA Abloy. Axis ran its first Axis Partner Showcase in 2015 and said feedback was overwhelmingly positive. New possibilities As connectivity and the integration of products continues, the security needs of businesses change opening up new possibilities, said Daren Lang, regional manager of business development for Northern Europe at Axis Communications. Our strategies and solutions must therefore change to meet the new opportunities created. We are thrilled to announce the return of the Axis Partner Showcase. This event is designed to demonstrate how our partners, in conjunction with Axis, can deliver solutions that stand the test of time whether looking at the shift from forensic to real time analysis, how to deal with issues around cybersecurity, or keeping pace with new regulations such as GDPR. As security requirements shift, we see an increasing demand for alternative solutions. Instead of focusing on surveillance alone, businesses are increasingly seeking ways in which smart systems can be integrated, ensuring technology is flexible and future facing. This is how we help ensure that technology is not only fit for purpose, but fit for the future.

Atul Rajput, regional director for Northern Europe at Axis Communications, said: The pace of innovation is core to Axis philosophy and is of critical importance to keep each of our customers and partners up-to-date with the technology available today as well as its potential for tomorrow. Our showcase event brings this under one roof, providing the best forum available to experience these innovations in person. The Axis Partner Showcase takes place on 11 October 2017, between 10am and 4pm, at Tenants Hall, Tatton Park, Knutsford, Cheshire, WA16 6QN.

Register here to attend. Free download: The video surveillance report 2017 Sponsored by IDIS The Video Surveillance Report 2017 covers all things video surveillance based on a poll of hundreds of security professionals. Specifically looking at topics such as open platforms, 4K, low-light cameras, video analytics, warranties and this year due to the growing threat posed, the cybersecurity landscape.

Click here to Download now

Home automation: A beginner s guide

Home automation has come a long way since the 1960s when British racing driver Stirling Moss fitted his newly built House of the Future in London s Mayfair with the latest gadgets. The extension of commercial heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) controls into the residential market alongside smart lighting and security solutions has since revolutionised the way home owners interact with domestic systems and appliances using an expanding combination of hardware, communication protocols and electronic interfaces. Certainly use of devices such as IP cameras for domestic surveillance systems, motion detection hardware, door opening sensors and remote controls have surged, though from a low base.

The ubiquity of wireless networks using Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and to a lesser extent ZigBee and Z-Wave in the home has also helped, providing the communications channel that devices, sensors and back end software systems need to transmit, store and analyse the information being collected. Security is the biggest are of demand amongst smart home users, with sales of connected cameras and remotely controlled door and window locks driving much of that usage. But the volume and diversity of deployments and applications is diverse, including connected white goods appliances (fridges, cookers, washing machines etc) alongside audio devices and entertainment hubs, lighting and heating controls, pet and baby monitors, and even products designed to automate the watering and monitoring of plant growth. Developments elsewhere may also have a galvanising affect, particularly the growth of the Internet of Things (IoT) which is forecast to connect over devices by 2020. This vast network of interlinked monitors, sensors, computers, controllers, switches and other industrial and consumer gadgets will collect and analyse information from systems as diverse as manufacturing, retail, transportation, automotive and agriculture. The considerable efforts being put into driving the IoT market by the likes of Cisco, Intel, IBM, Microsoft and other heavyweight information communications technology (ICT) companies will inevitably help to push home automation systems (a form of consumer IoT) into the spotlight. Barriers to adoption But while there is a strong feeling that the home automation industry stands on the brink of mass market adoption, significant barriers to its further development remain. The lack of interoperability between so many different devices, protocols, networks and applications continues to undermine user confidence, for example. Home owners also find systems difficult to use, a problem exacerbated by those incompatibility issues and a general lack of familiarity with home automation in general.

Though they have steadily fallen in price, home automation devices remain expensive and are likely to remain so until their popularity reaches a tipping point that will persuade large scale manufacturers to drive down costs further by producing equipment in higher volumes. Long device replacement cycles push suppliers to charge a premium for current deployments and make it difficult for them to build profitable businesses based on recurring revenue streams one reason why many seek to push consumers into managed services contracts wherever possible. Housebuilders are building smart heating controls and thermostats into new homes designed to give residents greater control over their energy costs, but retrofits on older properties remain more difficult and expensive and a thriving DIY market makes it difficult for professional installers to compete. The potential for cyber security breaches to cause disruption is finally starting to be recognised, if not necessarily addressed. But the biggest barrier is the technological fragmentation of the smart home ecosystem that involves so many different types of devices, networks and software systems, and needs them all to work together to deliver value to the house owner. Market adoption rates One analyst firm has gone so far as to predict that sales of home automation hardware, software and services will exceed US$78bn by 2022, with more conservative estimates forecasting US$20.78bn by 2020. As ever with analyst forecasts, there can be discrepancies of definition that tend to skew the numbers one way or another however, though research firm Gartner has predicted that the average home could contain as many as 500 smart devices by 2022. Much of that turnover will continue to be driven by the larger population base of the US and China, followed by Japan ahead of Europe and the UK which are collectively yet to show the same levels of enthusiasm. Figures from Statista suggest that the number of smart homes in the US will grow from 4.6m households in 2015 to 24.5m by 2020 for example, compared to 400,000 growing to 3.3m in Japan and 300,000 increasing to 2.1m in China over the same period.

Statista calculates Germany to be the single largest European market, with 300,000 smart homes last year growing to 2.4m by 2020 compared to 200,000 in the UK increasing to 1.5m in the same period. Key players Research published by CBInsights earlier this year suggests that a lot of venture capitalist funding is going into home automation start-ups such as Nest Labs. These now fight for market share alongside established industrial automation companies which have moved into the home automation space (Honeywell International, GE, Legrand, Siemens, ABB, and United Technologies Corporation, for example) but also home automation specialists such as Crestron Electronics, Savant and Control4. Technology giants such as Samsung, Google and Amazon are also coming to the fore, having spied parallel opportunities for mobile apps, devices and operating systems alongside information processing platforms that they can exploit. Flagship home automation products to date include the Nest smart home thermostats and cameras, Sonos music systems, GE s Z-Wave components and Samsung SmartThings Hub. Amazon s Echo and Google s Home voice activated smarthubs are also driving usage by delivering Internet connected, multimedia gadgets that can also be used to control smart thermostats and other devices. Free download: The video surveillance report 2017 Sponsored by IDIS The Video Surveillance Report 2017 covers all things video surveillance based on a poll of hundreds of security professionals.

Specifically looking at topics such as open platforms, 4K, low-light cameras, video analytics, warranties and this year due to the growing threat posed, the cybersecurity landscape.

Click here to Download now

How to follow up sales leads following IFSEC and FIREX International

exhibitor advice Less than 70% of exhibitors have any kind of formalised plan or process in place for following up leads following a trade show or other live event. That s a pretty alarming oversight given the time, effort and resource committed to such endeavours and the enormous rewards if they re exploited to the fullest. Of course, trade shows benefit your brand in multiple other albeit more difficult to measure ways.

Those who stopped by your stand or listened to a presentation delivered by one of your representatives will leave the show knowing a bit more about what you do and (hopefully) be impressed with your products and/or expertise. They may have even been introduced to your brand for the very first time. And that s great. But it s not enough especially given the digital tools now available that can yield more concrete, quantifiable returns on your investment. The hard work doesn t end on 5pm of the final day of the show. Indeed: what, when and how you communicate to prospects that you met at the show in the following days, weeks and months can really make the difference. Here are some tips to make the most of your time at IFSEC International, FIREX International or other trade shows. Time is of the essence Get your follow-up strategy and campaign materials as ready as possible in advance of the event. You ve a greater chance of impressing and securing the custom of prospects if you follow up days or weeks faster than your competitors.

Prioritise your leads Grade your leads ranging from the hottest prospects, where someone requested a follow up and seemed keen on working with you, down to those who merely submitted their email address as part of a raffle you held on your stand. Then prioritise your responses accordingly. This means not only contacting high priority leads more urgently but also tailoring your communications more extensively. Lower priority prospects might be sent a standard email en masse, while the hottest leads will warrant a tailored email or depending on the preference expressed a phone call. Customise your call to action Your first follow up needn t be a hard sell. It all depends where the lead is in the sales funnel. You could instead send them a piece of content like a video, case study, white paper or blog post. And make your call to action descriptive of the benefit the prospect will actually get by clicking. So do say: Download white paper , request a personal demo , or join us for a free networking lunch ; don t say: Find out more or click here for more information .

A single call to action is often said to be best marketing practice. However, don t be afraid to offer 2-3 alternatives if your target data is sufficiently diverse in its preferences and stage of the buying journey to warrant it. For instance, you could offer the following options: request a demo , watch our video or sign up to our newsletter . Jog the prospect s memory Remind the prospect of the product launches, integrations, partnerships and other announcements you made during the show. There s so much going on at IFSEC, it s perfectly possible that they won t recall all relevant details. Include visuals in your emails A photo of your IFSEC stand busy with lots of people, ideally! is usually a strong image, though you may instead use a picture of a product they declared an interest in. Personalise each email People like to know they re dealing with an individual not a company, so sign off with the relevant salesperson s name and, crucially, their phone number and personal email. Don t rely on Microsoft Excel spreadsheets Microsoft Excel is useful for financial accounts but a chaotic nightmare and terrible for collaboration when applied to customer relationship management (CRM).

Automated lead nurturing tools make building on your conversations at the trade show easier, less time-consuming and, on average, more fruitful. There are countless platforms out there, some of which are free, with others charging a monthly subscription. Just to give three examples, Communigator, tray.io and run by SalesForce, the most popular CRM by far Pardot are all highly effective lead nurturing tools. Free download: The video surveillance report 2017 Sponsored by IDIS The Video Surveillance Report 2017 covers all things video surveillance based on a poll of hundreds of security professionals. Specifically looking at topics such as open platforms, 4K, low-light cameras, video analytics, warranties and this year due to the growing threat posed, the cybersecurity landscape.

Click here to Download now

SaaS-based critical communications during terror attacks, natural disasters and business-continuity scenarios

Critical communications platforms are an increasingly vital tool for governments, law enforcement and other blue-light services. Exploiting the prevalence, connectivity and processing power of the modern smartphone, such platforms are sadly indispensable given the growing global frequency of terror attacks and increasingly turbulent weather patterns widely attributed to climate change. IFSEC Global spoke to Nick Hawkins, managing director EMEA at a provider of one such solution, Everbridge.

The interview below covers deployments in the Boston Bombing and Westminster attack as well as where Everbridge sits in this burgeoning market. IFSEC Global: Who are Everbridge and what do you do? Nick Hawkins: Fundamentally we re a software organisation that provides a critical communications platform that helps to keep people safe and keep s businesses running. So if any organisation of any size wants to look after their staff, or when they have IT issues, they look to our platform to reach out to people to can deal with it and to reduce the downtime and associated costs. Obviously time is of the essence during emergency situations and the whole idea of the platform is to reduce the time it takes for people to take actions One of our largest clients is the State of Florida, home to 20 million people. We protect residents, businesses and visitors to the state when there are hurricanes, weather warnings We were heavily used in the Boston Marathon attack back in 2013. And a lot of organisations use the service to communicate with residents as well as organisations and employees to get them to safety during emergencies. Our platform is also used to bring in extra staff for hospitals and other governmental organisations. Obviously time is of the essence during emergency situations and the whole idea of the platform is to reduce the time it takes for people to take actions whether that s protecting lives or, if business systems go down, the longer those systems aren t up and running, the greater the impact and cost to that organisation.

We have about 3,500 clients. In the UK that includes eight of the top 10 commercial banks, several police forces, government organisations, enterprises Really the platform goes across all verticals. It s not platform-specific. IG: I gather that Everbridge played a role in the Westminster attacks? NH: Yes our platform was used by a few London hospitals and the metropolitan police as well as businesses across the capital who wanted to communicate with employees after the incident The emergency services did a great job, but the bigger picture is: how do you communicate to the public and community to keep them informed of what is happening? I think the thing here is correct communications, and where do you rely on the communication. What we saw in the Boston bombing was that organisations used the platform to communicate not only to the blue light services, but to residents in the community too. We also use multiple modes of communication, because you can t rely on one form of communication such as SMS, voice or email, because one might be taken down How do you communicate out to all those other people affected? And not just the emergency services and other people directly involved.

How many other people were affected by the Westminster attack? Millions. There was a knock-on impact, with additional security and transport affected. Another organisation called the Cross-Sector Security Communications platform used the Everbridge service as well. That s predominantly run by the Met Police. They used it to communicate to people outside those directly involved, to the wider community. It was very actively used. IG: Is this a particularly competitive market? What is your USP?

NH: We differentiate ourselves with what we call critical event management. So it s assessing the situation as to what s happened situational intelligence locating individuals you want to communicate with, and automating the process so you reduce the time that it takes. The key thing is getting the right message to the right person at the right time. We also use multiple modes of communication, because you can t rely on one form of communication such as SMS, voice or email, because one might be taken down. We saw this in the 7/7 bombings when the SMS network was brought down. So a message goes out via one mode and if it doesn t work then it just moves onto the next one. You don t have to do anything; it s automated. We continuously analyse data to identify the best way of communicating, then feed that back in to the whole lifecycle of locate, automate and communicate Analytics and big data is a huge area we re investing in. We re sending in the region of two billion messages a year.

And people are now saying: You sent all these messages what analytics do you undertake with the results? So we continuously analyse the data to identify the best way of communicating, what s the best message to communicate, then feed that back in to the whole lifecycle of what I talked about: assess, locate, automate and then communicate. If you have better analytics and big data feeding into that, you re going to be a lot more knowledgeable about how to assess the situation and communicate. It s a lifecycle, a 360 view of a situation. IG: Does your platform get used in training exercises undertaken by emergency services? NH: Absolutely. If you don t undertake training and planning, then when these incidents happen you can be caught short. And we can have all these plans because we re all mobile today. We have the ability to do it all on the fly.

IG: Thanks, Nick. Is there anything else you would like to add? NH: The police force and emergency services are only so many people. If you expand that out to the community you ve got a much bigger group of people who can assist you, the police and everyone else. We re seeing a lot more incidents, particularly in America, where the public are actually assisting with some of this process through two way communication. In Windsor, where our office is, they brought in hostile-vehicle mitigation systems as a result of the Westminster attack. They did it overnight. But there s only so much the authorities can do. And I think one of the key things we do well is that we do take on new processes and procedures after events and listen to the feedback we get from our customers to improve our services Free Download: Securing UK borders: An examination of the implications of leaving the EU for UK border management.

Recent tragic events in Manchester and London have, among other things, underscored the importance to national security of getting Brexit right.

This report considers the implications of leaving the EU for the management of the UK s borders and making it as easy as possible for international business to thrive and legitimate movement to occur in a post-Brexit UK.

Click here to download now

How to develop a fire-risk management strategy

Where fire is concerned, honesty is the best policy, strategy and procedure. That was the message in an article I authored last year which focused on the importance of fire policy. What amounts to fire policy, fire risk management strategy and procedure is not thoroughly understood and many people responsible for fire safety within organisations or individual buildings struggle to get it right.

Following the release of BS 9999: 2017, which contains a revised section 4 entitled Designing for the management of fire risk , I thought it might be worthwhile sharing some thoughts on how to craft fire risk management strategy. In this article I ll answer the following questions: What is a fire risk management strategy? Why it is useful to have one? Who might be tasked with developing one? When might one be required? How should it be structured? What is a fire risk management strategy? As the title would suggest a fire risk management strategy is focused towards the management of fire risk. There are some subtle differences between a fire strategy and a fire risk management strategy.

A fire strategy report describes the fire safety issues and how they are addressed. It acts as a guide for the design team, by identifying standards or setting performance criteria eg for the capacity of a smoke extract system and/or the fire resistance of elements of structure. It is the basis of the submission to the approving authorities ie building control body and fire authority. A concept fire strategy report will evolve through the design process being refined and expanded as the project progresses with a view to becoming an as-built fire strategy for use throughout the building s life cycle. The term fire-risk management strategy was defined in PAS 7: 2013 as a document which defines an organisations fire risk management system and method of implementing the overarching policy . A fire risk management strategy can be developed for an organisation responsible for a single building or an organisation with responsibility for a multi-site portfolio. Why it is useful to have one? When designing fire risk management into buildings there is great benefit in providing building occupiers and/or their person designated with fire safety responsibilities ie fire, health and safety managers with the opportunity to become involved with the design and construction process thus ensuring improved operational performance and better working environments. There are also ongoing business benefits.

The maintenance and operational costs of a building during its lifecycle far outweigh the original capital cost of construction, and these could potentially be explored and relayed by the fire engineer. Benefits of incorporating fire risk management into the building s fire strategy The key benefits can be identified as: Involvement at an early stage of building, managers and end users or their fire safety/health and safety managers allowing for early challenges of the practical implications of design concepts in terms of how they may impact upon on-going day to day practicalities, maintenance and operational costs pertaining to the fire strategy. Ensuring that full training, commissioning and handover is provided at an early stage, which reduces the cost of a protracted handover and means the building will reach optimal performance sooner. Allowing for post occupancy evaluation, which monitors the project outcomes post completion against performance and cost criteria, and ensures lessons are learned for future projects. When might one be required? A fire risk management strategy may be developed by someone designing new buildings or it may be developed as part of organisations fire risk management system documentation. At the design stage, a fire strategy report will usually contain some commentary on management, for example; where it has been necessary to make assumptions regarding the management of the building in the development of the fire strategy these should be stated in the fire strategy report. The fire strategy report may incorporate more comprehensive commentary on fire risk management, for example; if variations from the national guidance are proposed and justified with the use of fire engineering analysis or simply as the fire strategy report evolves through the design process into an as built fire strategy and more information on the use and management of the building comes to light. A fire risk management strategy for a single building may remain incorporated within the fire strategy report or become a separate document.

If a fire risk management strategy is drafted for an organisation operating a portfolio of buildings it is preferable for it to be a separate document. A fire-risk management strategy can also be developed post occupation. The standard Scope of Works for the Fire Engineer produced by the Fire Industry Association and Fire Engineering Council sets out the following services at RIBA Stage 7 Use and aftercare (previously RIBA stage L). These services are to produce, or assist in the production, of organisational fire risk management policy, strategy and procedure. Moreover, organisations seeking to achieve a high level of assurance and management system level 1, as defined in BS 9999: 2017 can demonstrate this by conformity to PAS 7. In order to demonstrate attainment of a level 1 management system some organisations may decide to have their management system certificated. Who might have cause to develop or review one? There may be a number of professionals with interest in the development of a fire risk management strategy. The interested parties could range from fire safety professionals i.e.

designers, fire engineers and fire safety managers, or owners, tenants, occupants, facility managers, health and safety managers and security staff. There may be a number of professionals with an interest in reviewing a fire risk management strategy and these could include: regulators and enforcers, including building control bodies, fire authorities, health and safety inspectors, environmental health officers, and environmental agencies. There may also be third party certification bodies with an interest in certificating a fire risk management system may wish to assess any claim of conformity against PAS 7. A claim of conformity can be made on the basis of: a) a first ‘party conformity assessment performed by the organization itself (self ‘assessment); b) a second ‘party conformity assessment performed by, for example; a trade association; or c) a third ‘party conformity assessment performed by an organization, such as a certification body, that is independent of both the organization responsible for the fire risk management system and, for example; a trade association. Guidelines for auditing management systems are given in BS EN ISO 19011. Requirements for bodies providing audit and certification of management systems are given in BS EN ISO/IEC 17021-1. How should it be structured? PAS 7 imposes a requirement that the organisation shall define and document its fire risk management strategy in order to implement and maintain procedures that identify the aspects of its activities, products and services relevant to the scope. By considering the context of the organisation it is possible to evaluate the risks to the organizsation by determining and recording those aspects that can have a significant impact on life safety, property protection, business continuity and the environment, as dictated by the organisation s policy.

The fire risk management strategy shall address the following seven factors of strategic fire risk management: Fire risk assessment Resources and authority Fire safety training Control of work on site Maintenance and testing Communication Emergency planning Michael Porter once said: Strategy is about making choices, trade-offs; it s about deliberately choosing to be different . In many ways this is true of a fire risk management strategy. A strategic fire risk management approach can be defined as an integrated or holistic approach to understanding and managing risks posed by the threat of fire that enables an organisation to optimise its underlying processes and achieve more efficient results. In our experience, no two organisations have the same strategy even if they are in the same sector. The benefits of establishing effective fire risk management strategy are clearly demonstrable, being able to align the nuances of fire risk management into the broader auspices of safety/quality management. This is particularly useful for organisations standardising approaches within other disciplines such as: health and safety, environmental protection, business continuity, security and quality systems. BB7 is offering a free gap analysis against the requirements of PAS 7: 2013 Fire Risk Management System Specification.

They are particularly interested in hearing from organisations with complex fire risk management challenges.

Synergis and SALTO locks integration means our customers can cost-effectively replace mechanical locks, says Genetec

integration Genetec Synergis the IP access control system of Security Center now supports SALTO SVN-enabled locks, Genetec has announced. SALTO s standalone battery-operated locks, which are now available through Genetec s global reseller network, can now replace traditional mechanical locks on doors and entrances that might have otherwise been too expensive to network with wired or wireless locks. Harnessing RFID (radio-frequency identification) technology escutcheons, electronic cylinders, locker locks, electronic padlocks and other SALTO locks can communicate with a central server through a smart data-on-card system.

The keycard contains all access data. An offline standalone door, locker, cabinet or server rack can writes data like access rights, blacklist information or battery status back onto a card, which then relays this data back to Synergis via online wall readers, thanks to two-way communication. The integration also means that Synergis access cards and locks can now be updated, restricted or deleted remotely. Customers who rely on traditional mechanical brass keys for interior openings like doors, cabinets and lockers are all too familiar with the tremendous costs and loss of time associated with rekeying and lock reprogramming, says Derek Arcuri, access control product marketing manager at Genetec. The integration between SALTO SVN and Security Center Synergis unlocks an opportunity for customers to efficiently heighten their security without the added expense of adding network access to each interior opening. The SALTO range of SVN-supported locks includes the cost-effective XS4 range of escutcheons, electronic cylinders and the entire SALTO platform. For customers who wish to include offline locks in their managed access control infrastructure the only option was until now to replace these standalone locks with more expensive hard wired or wireless options. The SALTO SVN-enabled locks are not only priced similarly to traditional locks, but they can now be integrated and managed within Synergis through the movement of SALTO SVN smartcards, says Bill Wood, president of Salto Systems, North America. The SALTO XS4 platform is available immediately through Genetec and its certified global network of resellers.

Genetec develops open-architecture software, hardware and cloud-based services for the physical security and public safety industry.