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Radiation-blocking underwear and 18 other bizarre smart things that could let hackers into your smart home (and one device to protect you)

No object, however mundane, cannot be improved with a computer chip: this seems to be the philosophy driving development of smart things in the smart home arena. It was partly this scattergun approach that prompted Wired magazine to prophesise the demise of the internet of things (IoT) at the start of 2017. Click on the icons in our infographic below to check out 19 of the most bizarre or according to IoT sceptics pointless devices that are creating new vectors of attack for cybercriminals.

Security is little more than an afterthought on too many devices, with criminals able to guess default usernames and passwords by trawling Google. We haven t chosen these 19 devices based on security some may have very rigorous security mechanisms in place. Rather, we chose the most bizarre devices, and paradoxically, in this context, bizarre also means mundane the point being: is a smart hair brush or smart fork really going to deliver benefits that warrant creating new avenues through which hackers could break into your home network? Several products designed to boost IoT security were launched at CES 2017, suggesting the industry is waking up to the threat. We ve included one of them below flagged with a red icon. Free Download: the Cyber Security Crashcourse This report contains 40 slides packed with insight into the trends shaping the industry and how you can protect yourself. Eric Hansleman from 451 Research presents a rapid-fire overview of cyber security.

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The pioneer behind the world s first unpickable lock: Abloy celebrates 110th birthday

Security lock pioneer Abloy is celebrating its 110 th birthday. The venerable Finnish brand, which merged with ASSA in 1994, revolutionised the locking industry when it patented the disc cylinder-operated lock in 1919. The innovation was the brainchild of founder Emil Henriksson, who in 1907 decided to redeploy the rotating detainer discs inside cash registers inside locks.

The precision mechanics engineer patented the idea 12 years later and registered the Abloy trademark. Virtually unpickable, the lock propelled Abloy to being a market leader not just in Finland but globally too. Henrickkson later integrated electromechanical technology with the mechanical lock, during the 1960s and 1970s. In 1994, Abloy merged with ASSA to form the ASSA ABLOY group. In recent years Abloy has developed access control systems such as PROTEC2 CLIQ and CLIQ Connect, which reduced the number of keys required. Abloy s product range includes both mechanical and electric locks, as well as access control systems, which are deployed in a wide range of sectors. From museums and sporting venues to hospitals, airports and government buildings, its locks protect some of the world s most iconic landmarks.

Watch: The LPCB Attack Testing Zone at IFSEC 2017

Security doors, perimeter fencing, shutters and covers were subjected to hammers, wire cutters and other handheld tools in the LPCB Attack Testing Zone at IFSEC 2017. The new area, which took place within Borders & Infrastructure Expo itself debuting and is expected to return again for the 2018 show, saw technicians from the LPCB put non-approved products to the test alongside LPCB-approved alternatives that have achieved a minimum of LPS 1175 SR-3 compliance. We ve put together a highlights video, below, from the Attack Testing Zone.

The LPCB Loss Prevention Certification Board was set up by certification body BRE Global. embedded content Free Download: Securing UK borders: An examination of the implications of leaving the EU for UK border management. Recent tragic events in Manchester and London have, among other things, underscored the importance to national security of getting Brexit right.

This report considers the implications of leaving the EU for the management of the UK s borders and making it as easy as possible for international business to thrive and legitimate movement to occur in a post-Brexit UK.

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How to use a fire extinguisher safely and effectively

In many occurrences of fire, it s not always safe or practical to try to put it out yourself, so evacuation and calling the fire brigade may be the only option. This is especially the case if the fire is large or spreading, the room is filling with deadly smoke, or there is no fire escape route. But for lesser fires contained in a small space, using a fire extinguisher, if it is safe to do so, can be very effective.

Deploying a fire extinguisher correctly depends on which type it is and on what type of material is on fire. Using the wrong extinguisher is at best ineffective, and at worst could intensify the fire, so ascertain the fuel first and then ensure you have the right type of extinguisher to hand before you tackle the fire. Materials present in the area to be protected from fire in the UK can be divided into six categories of fire involving different substances: Class A , combustible carbon-based solids eg paper, wood or textiles Class B , flammable liquids eg paraffin, petrol, diesel or oil (but not cooking oil) Class C , flammable gases, eg butane, propane or methane Class D , burning metals, eg aluminium, lithium or magnesium Fires caused by electrical equipment (indicated by an electric spark symbol and not the letter E) Class F , fats and cooking oils. The following types of extinguishers can be used to quench the various types of fire: Class A water, water mist, foam, dry powder, wet chemical Class B water mist, foam, dry powder, CO2, some wet chemical Class C water mist, dry powder Class D specialist dry powder Electrical some water mist, some foam, CO2 Class F water mist, wet chemical. General safety principles Familiarise yourself with the extinguisher and how to use it before there is a fire. Most extinguishers include a handle or lever, a hose with a horn or nozzle, a safety pin and seal, a pressure gauge, and the relevant fluid, powder or gas Evacuate everyone else from the building Ascertain the location of your fire exit or escape route Make sure the flames are shorter than you and the fire is contained, eg in a wastepaper basket. Don t stay near the fire or use the extinguisher unless you feel safe to do so Inspect the extinguisher and read the instructions before using it Check it is fully charged or it won t work (the pressure gauge on top should be in the green area. If it s red, the extinguisher has expired) Check the safety pin is not bent or the nozzle clogged or damaged and remove the safety pin to break the tamper seal Use the PASS protocol Pull the pin to unlock the mechanism, Aim the hose at the base of the fire, Squeeze the lever slowly, Sweep the hose from side to side Stand so that your back is towards the nearest exit or escape route never turn your back on a fire Stand between 6 and 8 feet away from the fire, moving closer as it is gradually extinguished. Always aim at the base of the fire Always ensure all areas of the fire are completely out Leave the scene immediately once the extinguisher is discharged and call 999 if the fire isn t completely out Replace or recharge the extinguisher.

Water extinguishers (Class A) First, it is essential to check that there is no live electrical equipment in the area. Then point the hose at the base of the flames and squeeze the lever slowly to discharge the extinguisher. Keep it moving across the area of the fire or move it slowly upwards if the fire is spreading vertically. Make sure that all areas of the fire are out completely. If not, repeat the process or get help. Water mist extinguishers (Classes A, B, C, F and some electrical) The instructions are the same as for water extinguishers, except that some water mist models can be used on electrical equipment up to 1,000 Volts, such as computers and printers. Foam extinguishers (Classes A, B and some electrical) For fires involving solids (A), point the jet at the base of the flames and keep it moving across the area of the fire. For fires involving liquids (B), aim the jet at a vertical surface near the fire, not straight into the liquid, eg in a container, point the jet at the inside edge of the container or a nearby surface above the burning liquid. Allow the foam to build up and flow across the liquid to break the interaction between the flames and the fuel surface.

Dry powder extinguishers (Classes A, B, C, and some D if specialist powder) Point the jet or discharge horn at the base of the flames, driving the fire towards the far edge with a rapid sweeping motion until extinguished. Make sure the fire does not flare up again, as this type of extinguisher does not cool the fire very effectively. Also, make sure you don t inhale the toxic powder, so do not use in an enclosed space. The use of specialist powder extinguishers to tackle burning metals (D) requires a different technique from standard extinguishers. Potential users should be trained in their use. CO2 extinguishers (Class B and electrical) Switch off the power if an electrical fire, if safe to do so. Direct the discharge horn at the base of the flames. Keep the jet moving across the area of the fire until it is suffocated. Be careful your fingers do not freeze to the horn.

Watch for re-ignition of the fire. CO2 extinguishers have a very short discharge time. Wet chemical extinguishers (Class A, F, and some B) These are mainly used to extinguish chip pan fires using animal or vegetable fats. Turn off the heat source if safe to do so. Apply the wet chemical evenly at arm s length above the fire, at least one metre away from the fire, using the extended long applicator or lance in slow, gentle, circular movements, so that the burning fat or oil does not splash out. Spray until its surface changes into a foamy, soapy substance, which acts as a blanket. Use the entire extinguisher to prevent reignition. Potential users should be trained in how to use these extinguishers properly. Other extinction methods Fire blankets.

Turn off the heat source if safe to do so. Pull the tapes to release the blanket from its container. Carefully place the blanket over the fire keeping hands out of the way. Leave to cool. If a person is on fire, wrap the blanket around them. To use hose reels effectively, point the jet at the base of the flames and keep it moving across the area of the fire. Ensure that all areas of the fire are out.

The water or sand in fire buckets should be thrown at the base of the flames, ensuring that all areas of the fire are out.

Finally, if there is no fire extinguisher to hand, and the fire is very small, you could try using a wet cloth or towel or shovelling sand or dirt, if available, onto the fire.

Architect says sprinkler installation at Glasgow Hospital was used as an excuse to flout other buildings standards

Cost-cutting Credit: George Allison under CC BY-SA 4.0 An architect who helped design Scotland s largest hospital has warned that corners were cut in the construction of the 14-storey complex in the name of keeping down costs. Robert Menzies, now retired from his role at BMJ Architects, believes the installation of a sprinkler system in Glasgow s Queen Elizabeth University Hospital has been used as an excuse for flouting other building standards. He says the complex, which includes a children s hospital, adult hospital and laboratory, lacks exit stairways and exceeds size limits on fire compartments, while a hose-reel for firefighters is too short and some fire doors open in the wrong direction.

Insulation panels used in Grenfell tower are also fitted to the hospital, although the health board has insisted they are safe. Menzies drew up the hospital s exemplar design which sets criteria that firms bidding for construction projects must meet as senior healthcare architect at BMJ. He says the construction contract was given to London-based Brookfield Multiplex in defiance of architects recommendations that a bid from Balfour Beatty be accepted on the basis of cost , he suspects. They ve then made the stairs the minimum width possible. Surely you d want to make them wider to compensate for not having enough stairways in the first place? Robert Menzies, BMJ Architect We thought we would provide a monitoring role right through to completion of the actual build, in terms of where this is compliant and where it s not, so we were surprised to be told we were no longer required, Menzies told the Glasgow Evening Times. I had read the winning bidder s fire strategy and it concerned me a lot. It was almost like they the health board didn t want us around asking questions. It was very odd.

Lack of stairways On the lack of stairways he said: They are supposed to provide three stairways minimum as an emergency escape route if there are more than 100 people per storey. In the adult tower, there are 112 patients per floor but only two stairways. They are only slightly over, but that s just the patients there are also staff and visitors. They ve then made the stairs the minimum width possible. Surely you d want to make them wider to compensate for not having enough stairways in the first place? At least one fire compartment was too big in the original designs, says Menzies at least for the limit prescribed in Scotland, set at 1500sq, whereas it did meet the 2,000sq metre limit set in England. Pointing to the high failure rate of sprinklers in US hospitals 20% of which have had fires where sprinklers failed Menzies told the Glasgow Evening Times that an over-reliance on sprinklers was foolish. If you re putting sprinklers in and you re saying a fire will never occur as a consequence, then why do you need escape stairs? Why do you need anything?

But what happens when the sprinkler system fails? They re not 100%. A spokesman for NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde did not dispute the veracity of Menzies claims, but pointed out that all buildings in the hospital complex were certified as compliant with Scottish fire safety and building standards by Glasgow City Council in 2015. Health Facilities Scotland also endorsed the hospital s fire strategy, he said. He said: It is important that everyone working in and coming to these world class facilities for healthcare know that we take fire safety extremely seriously and that there are heat/smoke detection and early warning fire alarm systems combined with automatic fire suppression sprinkler systems fitted in all areas. The hospitals are further protected by designated fire-fighting and fire evacuation lifts, as well as multiple fire escape stairwells. A spokeswoman for Brookfield Multiplex said: The final design met all the requirements of the building regulations and was signed off progressively through construction by Glasgow City Council s building control office.

Construction consultancy firm Currie & Brown has been appointed to verify the hospitals construction and certification process following the Grenfell blaze.

UK government issues cybersecurity guidelines for connected cars

Cyber The Department for Transport has published cybersecurity guidelines for manufacturers of smart or connected cars. Written with help from the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure, the principles implore everyone in the automotive supply chain to collaborate during the design process and over software upgrades and maintenance long after cars hit the road. The authorities are concerned about the prospect of older vehicles running outdated software.

As cars become increasingly automated and ultimately, driverless the stakes will rise. Last year ethical hackers managed to wrest control of a Tesla Model S while the car was moving and slam on the brakes (see how they did it in the video below). Attacks can even inject malicious code into the electronic control units (ECUs) and controller-area-network (CAN) bus, which control critical systems such as electric steering and braking. Mark Noctor, VP EMEA, Arxan Technologies The eight principles, which were launched by transport minister Lord Callanan, follow: Organisational security is owned, governed and promoted at board level Security risks are assessed and managed appropriately and proportionately, including those specific to the supply chain Organisations need product aftercare and incident response to ensure systems are secure over their lifetime All organisations, including sub-contractors, suppliers and potential 3rd parties, work together to enhance the security of the system Systems are designed using a defence-in-depth approach The security of all software is managed throughout its lifetime The storage and transmission of data is secure and can be controlled The system is designed to be resilient to attacks and respond appropriately when its defences or sensors fail embedded content Connecting to WiFi and external devices via Bluetooth, Modern cars are increasingly smart . The communications and entertainment systems are particularly vulnerable to attack, and can be reverse engineered to access the API libraries that facilitate data sharing between systems, says Mark Noctor, VP EMEA at Arxan Technologies. From here attacks can even inject malicious code into the electronic control units (ECUs) and controller-area-network (CAN) bus, which control critical systems such as electric steering and braking. Preventing application code from being accessed and tampered is one of the biggest priorities in protecting a connected vehicle, and it is encouraging to see the government s guidelines specifically list the ability to protect code and ensure its integrity as key principles. Manufacturers must deploy code hardening measures to prevent attackers from accessing their source code and removing vital data such as cryptographic keys which can be used to access other systems. Anti-tampering measures should be hidden in the code to alert them if the code has been changed, and prevent systems from starting if alterations are detected.

The government announced the Autonomous and Electric Vehicles Bill, which will allow innovation to flourish and ensure the next wave of self-driving technology is invented, designed and operated safely in the UK , during the Queens Speech in June. The outcome of recent efforts by the US government to engage with US automakers over the issue do not augur well. Asked by a Senate committee if they supported mandatory privacy and safety standards, executives from Google, General Motors, Delphi and Lyft were evasive. Free Download: the Cyber Security Crashcourse This report contains 40 slides packed with insight into the trends shaping the industry and how you can protect yourself. Eric Hansleman from 451 Research presents a rapid-fire overview of cyber security.

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Watch: Installer World debuts with Tool Zone, Trade Counter and Engineers of Tomorrow competition

IFSEC 2017 IFSEC International this year launched an area dedicated to the needs of installers of fire and security technologies. Sponsored by RISCO, Installer World brought together manufacturers and distributors, the Tool Zone, workwear, the Engineers of Tomorrow competition, recruitment consultants and a networking bar. In the Tool Zone (big thanks to its exclusive partner, Anglia Tools), visitors sampled a wide range of hand and power tools and took advantage of exclusive discounts and special offers.

VanTainer also provided racking and storage systems. Check out our video review of Installer World below. embedded content Free download: The video surveillance report 2017 Sponsored by IDIS The Video Surveillance Report 2017 covers all things video surveillance based on a poll of hundreds of security professionals.

Specifically looking at topics such as open platforms, 4K, low-light cameras, video analytics, warranties and this year due to the growing threat posed, the cybersecurity landscape.

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Dell EMC Q&A: “Customers don’t want vendors pointing the finger at each other when there’s a problem; they want integrated…

Dell EMC specialises in hybrid cloud and big-data solutions that are built on converged infrastructure, servers, storage and cybersecurity technologies for enterprise customers. Nicholas Thermenos, the company s director of sales and marketing for surveillance and security in the Americas, spoke to our US-based media partner SecuritySolutionsWatch about the video surveillance landscape and how the industry is meeting soaring demand for video data storage. SecuritySolutionsWatch.com: Thank you for joining us today, Nick.

Before drilling down into how Dell EMC is making the world safer, please tell us about your background. Nicholas Thermenos: Since joining Dell EMC I ve been in a variety of technology leadership positions. I m currently responsible for our video surveillance sales strategy and business for the Americas. Prior to joining Dell EMC I spent 11 years at Microsoft in both technical and business leadership roles. SecuritySolutionsWatch.com: Manchester, Paris, Boston the security environment has never been more challenging. What trends are you seeing in the field with your customers as the never-ending race continues to make better decisions faster vs. the bad guys? Nicholas Thermenos: Video Surveillance is going through a fast-paced digital transformation from low cost, decentralized data repositories to true Enterprise Class, centralized infrastructure requirements. The increase in IP cameras, retention times, and the assurance that data will be available when needed, is moving customers to find new way to retain, store and access video surveillance data.

Business leaders are beginning to recognize that there are valuable insights to be gained from the vast amount of data that is being collected. Customers, particular business leaders, are looking to capitalize on the data contained in these video images. Both of these trends are changing the landscape of storing and accessing video. Read the full interview on SecuritySolutionsWatch.com Free download: The video surveillance report 2017 Sponsored by IDIS The Video Surveillance Report 2017 covers all things video surveillance based on a poll of hundreds of security professionals. Specifically looking at topics such as open platforms, 4K, low-light cameras, video analytics, warranties and this year due to the growing threat posed, the cybersecurity landscape.

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Wireless intrusion sensors: Adoption still weak in the commercial sector

Analysis Texecom Ricochet wireless external motion sensor IHS Markit estimates that 68 million intruder alarm sensors were sold globally in 2016 of which 41% were wireless, according to the latest intruder alarm and monitoring database. However, just 4% of those wireless intrusion sensors were destined for the large commercial sector. Residential and small-medium business sectors jointly accounted for the remaining 96% of the wireless sensor market.

Wireless benefits Although the use of wireless sensors remains limited in the commercial sector, the popularity of these products is on the rise for several reasons: Wireless sensors carry significantly lower installation costs as the installation process is much simpler and quicker. The lower install cost that comes with wireless sensors allows companies to allocate a greater portion of their security budget to hardware, enabling them to invest in additional or higher-quality sensors, or upgrades for the system, such as integration with video surveillance. Wireless solutions are also more practical in unique installations like remote areas without easy access to the power mains. To overcome range issues, mesh networks, which act as signal repeaters, are used for larger installations. Moreover, as the use of wireless sensors proliferates across commercial applications, consumers may choose to adopt wireless control panels, to allow for easier future addition of extra sensors, as they won t require on-site IT configuration to add to the system. Prices of wireless sensors have also fallen fast , decreasing by 16% since 2012. Battery lifespan of wireless sensors has also improved in recent years, now lasting between one and five years depending on circumstances. Although enhancements have been made, limited lifespan of sensor batteries will put pressure on the security systems manager, necessitating the procurement of software that will allow to easily manage battery statuses. More wireless sensors are available with UL certification , a prerequisite for many professional monitoring and insurance providers.

Wireless misgivings Although wireless sensor technology is making inroads into commercial projects, concerns remain such as encryption, sensor price and ongoing maintenance costs: Despite improvements to encryption for wireless systems, the risk of being hacked is still a common concern among large commercial end users. For example, wireless sensors are susceptible to jamming and signal interference, and if the system s control panel is compromised the entire network of wireless sensors can be rendered useless by disabling the wireless module. Wireless sensors are also more expensive than their wired counterparts . For example IHS Markit found that globally, a wireless PIR sensor costs 30% more than a wired variant on average. The maintenance costs of wireless sensors are also higher, with the requirement to buy and maintain a set of spare batteries for replacement or recharging. Long-term opportunities for vendors and installers Despite the challenges facing wireless security sensors in large-commercial applications today, manufacturers and installers that promote and install wireless sensors will likely reap long-term benefits of the devices: Vendors with strong after-sales service, such as customer service and maintenance, would be able to improve efficiency and speed of s ervice by capitalising on the greater ease with which wireless sensors can be added to the system. This will lead to shorter installation times allowing them to serve more customers in a set period of time. As wireless sensors are adopted on a wider scale, the significance of battery management system solutions will become apparent. Suppliers with the best battery management software, that is easy to use with interactive interface, are likely to seize the best of this opportunity.

Manufacturers of wireless sensors could further improve their products market opportunities by working closely with insurance providers and educating them about the benefits of wireless systems in commercial applications as well as their technological features. Entering into partnership with insurance providers may provide avenues for long-term impact. Free download: The video surveillance report 2017 Sponsored by IDIS The Video Surveillance Report 2017 covers all things video surveillance based on a poll of hundreds of security professionals.

Specifically looking at topics such as open platforms, 4K, low-light cameras, video analytics, warranties and this year due to the growing threat posed, the cybersecurity landscape.

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Crime data-sharing platform wins six-figure government funding

National Business Crime Solution An initiative for sharing data between the business community and law enforcement agencies has secured significant government funding. Founded by Jason Trigg, the former owner of Cardinal Security, the National Business Crime Solution (NBCS) is a centralised repository for business crime data from which intelligence can be generated to more effectively detect, prevent and respond to crime. The initiative helps stakeholders identify links between crimes committed across a wide geographic area because many criminals travel the length and breadth of the country to commit crime.

The not-for-profit initiative, which in three years has grown its membership by 213% to nearly 50 organisations, has been awarded a six-figure sum from the Police Transformation Fund, a Home Office programme. NBCS management say the money can help them become self-sustaining, make new appointments, attract new members, enhance corporate governance, raise awareness and revamp its branding. With additional resources they will also seek to enhance the quality of information shared and circulated and deliver a fraud-sharing platform. Preventative action This is a unique service from a trusted partner that truly offers the way forward for the industry and police to work together to achieve a common goal, said DCI Georgie Barnard of the National Police Chief s Council, which supports the NBCS. NBCS offers timely information on crime trends to enable businesses in all market sectors to take better preventative action and enable more effective engagement with the police. The NBCS is already credited with the positive identification of 419 suspects and arrest of 309 offenders over the last three years, as well as playing a role in securing sentences of over 200 years for offenders causing the most harm. The NBCS won a Retail Fraud Award in 2014 and an award for Best Collaborative Solution and Best Crime Partnership in 2016. We have proven that by working in collaboration we can build a national profile of business crime and actively support the police service by building watertight cases that result in real action, says Catherine Bowen, policy and stakeholder director at NBCS. The partnership between NBCS and the police service has gone from strength to strength and the money we have received from the Police Transformation Fund rubber stamps our credentials and can be seen as an endorsement of the work we do in better protecting businesses.

I m looking forward to providing an even better level of service to our existing members and welcoming new companies on board. Free download: The video surveillance report 2017 Sponsored by IDIS The Video Surveillance Report 2017 covers all things video surveillance based on a poll of hundreds of security professionals. Specifically looking at topics such as open platforms, 4K, low-light cameras, video analytics, warranties and this year due to the growing threat posed, the cybersecurity landscape.

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