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Smart door locks give agencies, service providers and rental platforms a competitive edge whatever their size

New market forecasts predict continued strong growth in the European holiday rentals market. The data and trends also hint at ways small, medium- and global-sized providers can ensure their short-term rental portfolio stays ahead of the competition. According to exclusive SAC Insight research* commissioned by ASSA ABLOY, from a base of ‘ 23.28bn in 2016, the European holiday rentals market will be worth ‘ 32.5bn by 2023.

Compound annual growth (CAGR) is forecasted at 5.8%. For the segment incorporating agencies and other booking platforms, the numbers are equally encouraging. SAC Insight expects European revenue in the agent market to grow from ‘ 14.55bn to ‘ 20.93bn over the same period. Estimated CAGR is 5.1%, a healthy rate for holiday rentals agencies and the blossoming service ecosystem that surrounds them. For modern travellers, the smartphone is their remote control for any trip. It s a boarding pass, a credit card, a travel guide why not a door key, too? The growth through sales and acquisitions of international players like Airbnb, HomeAway, Wimdu and Tripadvisor will continue. Yet smaller, often localised, increasingly professional agents, individuals and booking platforms still generate almost 90% of holiday rentals revenue across Europe. A winning strategy, whatever your scale One important success factor is the value proposition of a holiday rental versus a hotel or hostel at a similar price.

Its perceived value includes service and the authenticity a holiday rental offers. But as hotels innovate with keyless check-in via app in Starwood properties, for example can rentals compete for convenience? Absolutely, if they keep pace with the modern traveller. Small providers can use deep local knowledge to ensure properties stay on the right side of local regulations, for example, ensuring guests a hassle-free stay. This will be critical for agencies targeting business travellers seeking short-term, city-centre rentals. More data from SAC Insight points, unsurprisingly, towards faster growth in online revenue, at 9.8% annually versus 3.8% for offline booking. Small-scale landlords cannot match global brands for SEO or advertising spend, so the importance of online reviews and positive word-of-mouth marketing will grow. In other words, target customer satisfaction. This is where a smart door lock provides concrete assistance and potentially, a competitive advantage.

Get smart renting and forget about keys Tired of handing over keys? For modern travellers, the smartphone is an essential companion; they treat a mobile as their remote control for any trip. It s a boarding pass, a credit card, a travel guide why not a door key, too? The technology is already available and affordable for rental booking agencies and the property owners they represent. Potential admin benefits for agents are obvious. With a smart door lock, you spend less time managing physical keys; you eliminate the risk of lost or stolen keys, and unauthorised copying. It s less hassle all round. If every smart door lock in your portfolio connects to a single system, even one with additional smart home features, managing multiple properties is easier. The best smart door locks can be operated via an app, whether stand-alone or as part of an integrated smart home system.

Key handling is not just an agent problem; it s a big worry for guests, too. With a smart door lock, they will never get locked out. A PIN code or smartphone app opens the front door, so there s no need to carry keys or worry about losing them. With a smart door lock, it s easy for everyone in a group to come and go as they please, because each guest can have their own temporary key. Harmonious groups are happier groups! High occupancy and satisfied customers In Italy, boutique agency Home at Hotel has already reaped the benefits of installing smart door locks on urban holiday rentals in Milan, Rome and Cagliari. Properties are secured with an ENTR lock from Yale and integrated with the user-friendly SCLAK (www.sclak.com) app-powered access system. With ENTR and the SCLAK system, it s easier for Home by Hotel to offer value-added services, including breakfast delivery, grocery shopping and extra cleaning on demand. It s straightforward for agency staff to open doors remotely to admit a cleaner or cook, for example.

Home at Hotel apartments fitted with an ENTR smart door lock receive, on average, a 9/10 customer satisfaction rating No longer are apartment keys running around with the risk of being lost or copied, says Francesco Postiglioni from Home at Hotel. We can see when a guest has left the flat and can inhibit access if they do not respect the rules. We also have full control over our service suppliers, with the exact time they spend in the flat and when an apartment is ready for the next guest. With ENTR from Yale, Home at Hotel entrusts their clients to a lock brand with decades of history securing Europe s homes and offices. Smarter locks make more satisfied guests, which in turn means more return visits and better online reviews for our clients in the holiday rentals business, confirms Omer Sagi, Smart Door Lock Business Development Director at ASSA ABLOY. The outcome has been tangible for this rental agency: Home at Hotel apartments fitted with an ENTR smart door lock receive, on average, a 9/10 customer satisfaction rating. Occupancy is 80%. Get more business from business Looking forward, there are opportunities in short-term rentals for business travel. But here more than anywhere, clients expect a seamless, professional experience.

A smart door lock is one simple way for an agency to enable round-the-clock check-in and check-out, without creating extra work or incurring added staff costs. This is so important, in fact, that Airbnb now require check-in without a person-to-person key handover to qualify for Business Travel Ready status. Business travel will remain a major growth area for Airbnb (and therefore also for the service provider ecosystem that surrounds it). Deals with corporate travel specialists including CWT and Flight Centre**** are already in place. Professional touches such as a smart door lock will help small and medium-sized agencies to grab a slice of this booming market for themselves. With a smart door lock, rental agencies can charge a premium, and still expect the convenience benefits to be reflected in customer satisfaction, positive word-of-mouth, return visits and favourable online reviews. A new eight-page report from ASSA ABLOY Europe s holiday rentals market is packed with more exclusive data and charts, plus expert insight on the European holiday rentals sector and how smart door locks can help you serve it better. * SAC Insight, Europe Vacation Rental Market Analysis and Forecast (2017 2023) About ASSA ABLOY ASSA ABLOY is the global leader in door opening solutions, dedicated to satisfying end-user needs for security, safety and convenience. Since its formation in 1994, ASSA ABLOY has grown from a regional company into an international group with about 47,000 employees, operations in more than 70 countries and sales close to SEK 71 billion. In the fast-growing electro-mechanical security segment, the group has a leading position in areas such as access control, identification technology, entrance automation and hotel security.

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This report will help you to see why third parties should adhere to secure by design principles and why the necessary convergence of IT and security departments demands a holistic approach .

Download now Related Topics The 10 musts of museum access control and one technology that does them all Deliveries on your doormat even if you re out thanks to a smart new service from ASSA ABLOY and PostNord For connected home and residential service providers, smart locks open doors to new opportunities

Security to be tightened at Christmas markets amid fears of Berlin-style attack

COUNTER TERROR Security will be bolstered at forthcoming Christmas markets around the UK as councils aim to prevent a repeat of the Berlin attack that left 12 dead and 56 injured last year. Concrete bollards, armed police and random bag searches are among the measures being considered by police and local councils. The Local Government Association is reported to have urged councils to adhere to government guidance on protecting crowded places from attack.

Some Christmas market organisers are working with police to provide anti-terror training to staff as part of Project Griffin, a counter-terrorism initiative aimed at businesses. Depending on the terror threat level currently severe (an attack is highly likely) at the time, armed officers could be stationed around markets perimeter. Councils are stressing, however, that an armed police presence does not necessarily mean that an attack is imminent. Demand for concrete bollards has surged in the last two years following a series of attacks including incidents in Nice, Berlin and London Bridge where terrorists have weaponised vehicles in order to inflict mass casualties. Physical barriers were installed on three of London s bridges in the wake of June s terror attack at London Bridge and Borough Market. A Southampton city council spokesman has confirmed that concrete bollards will be installed ahead of 11 November when the city s own Christmas market opens. However, temporary outdoor events like Christmas markets and street festivals also require temporary solutions and the market is responding. ATG Access, for instance, has launched a lightweight road block system that can be deployed quickly and withstand the force of a 2,500kg vehicle traveling at 30 miles per hour. Avon Barrier Corporation, another UK firm, is even considering how to provide protection from gunfire.

Speaking to Arab News in August, Paul Jeffrey, the company s managing director, said: We are also looking at advertising boarding, so you incorporate some kind of ballistic protection within an advertising boarding so people run and hide. I am working on some very big projects that include that sort of thing. In London, the Metropolitan Police Service has said that additional safety measures around Christmas markets like Hyde Park s Winter Wonderland are likely. The public may see additional protective security measures and barriers at events this year, in response to a number of vehicle-based terrorist attacks we have sadly seen both here in the UK and abroad, said a force spokesman. There could also be increased security checks at some events and venues so we advise the public to arrive in plenty of time to allow for this. Guidance for mitigating security vulnerabilities around major public transport hubs, recently issued by the Department for Transport to local authorities, also incorporated recommendations about deterring attackers using vehicles as a weapon . German Christmas markets have proliferated in the UK in the last two decades and are regularly packed with people, day and night. Free Download: Securing the UK s borders. Getting national security and Brexit right first time is crucial , we do not want to get this wrong.

This report considers the implications of leaving the EU for the management of the UK s borders and making it as easy as possible for international business to thrive and legitimate movement to occur in a post-Brexit UK.

Click here to download now Related Topics At least 50 reported dead and 400 injured in Las Vegas shooting Finalists announced for the Security & Fire Excellence Awards 2017 How evolving terror tactics have driven advances in perimeter security

10 Years after Penhallow: Have we learned anything?

It is now 10 years after Penhallow, which has been described as the worst British hotel fire for 50 years and I think that it is important to look back at what we have learnt from this tragic failure of our fire safety laws. To add to this we now have the Grenfell Tower Fire that will surely be the worst fire that the UK has seen in living memory. I am also including some of the fire safety failures that I found during my recent undercover inspection of hotels in the South West for the BBC to illustrate the problem.

The Penhallow Hotel Fire 2007 For those who may have forgotten what happened this was an article that I wrote following the fire The Penhallow fire: accident, arson or imcompetence? The one part of this tragic incident that has remained with me over this period is this statement given by one of the witnesses at the inquest. She told the inquest how she saw one of the victims, 80-year old Joan Harper, trapped in her blazing room. She said that firefighters with just one engine and no firefighting ladder were to ill-equipped to come to the rescue. Describing the moment firemen did arrive at the scene, she is quoted as saying: Everybody was shouting at the fire brigade to save the lady, but they did not take any actions to save her When I saw their single fire engine with one hosepipe, this just reinforced my despair. They did not have the capability to deal with the fire. Tragically, this was not the only fatality as Peter Hughes jumped from a third story window and his 86 year old mother Monica Hughes also perished. At the inquest there were also many other factors that came to light including a poor fire risk assessment, poor access, lack of water, lack of equipment (high rise ladder) and the FRS (Fire and Rescue Service) being sent to the wrong address. Following this incident the FRS went around the country informing interested parties about this fire and when I asked them about aspects such as being sent to the wrong address they replied that they had no knowledge of this but these items are clearly in the inquest records both written and recorded.

The Grenfell Tower Fire 2017 Whilst obviously I cannot say a lot about this fire I think it is important to say that, if what has been reported in the media is true, then there are a number of similarities to the Penhallow Hotel Fire particularly in respect of people being trapped in the building and late arrival of a high rise ladder.

10 Years of Fires So what have we learnt in the last 10 years as we are always informed following these tragic incidents that we must learn from these tragic fires so they never happen again . Clearly when we find out what happened in the Grenfell Tower Fire there does need to be some major changes and Brexit should give us the opportunity to make these changes but I wonder if the will and impetus is there to make the radical changes that in my opinion are needed. Another important aspect that has come to light since the Grenfell Tower Fire is the subject of how we investigate serious fires and it is my view that I have stated many times that we need to establish a more robust, independent and open system that people can trust and respect. The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 Whilst Fire Certificates issued under the Fire precautions Act had their drawbacks I think that on balance it was a far better system than Fire Risk Assessments that in my opinion don t really work. There are many reasons for this and one of them is how the legislation is enforced. Figures released to the Guardian under the Freedom of Information Act showed the number of specialist staff in 26 fire services had fallen from 924 to 680, a loss of 244 officers between 2011 and 2017. Between 2011 and 2016, the government reduced its funding for fire services by between 26% and 39%, according to the National Audit Office, which in turn resulted in a 17% average real-terms reduction in spending power. Together with cuts to the FRS we have to look at how FRA are carried out and with no real standard assessment in place and poorly defined competency levels this was a recipe for failure. I found these words from a very well respected hotelier during the BBC investigation very interesting: I wish that the old system of fire certification with annual inspection was still in place.

The interesting thing here is that back in the 70 s/ 80 s each Fire Brigade interpreted legislation differently from area to area. The problem now is that consultants and operators interpret differently which of course in turn leads to a plethora of interpretations. In addition it is hard enough being a good hotelier let alone an expert in Health and safety/fire/food safety etc etc as well, however we do try to comply coupled with contracted professional guidance. Whilst the RRO appears on the surface to offer a better solution to our fire safety needs by placing the onus on the responsible person in practice I don t think that it works for the following reasons: Poorly defined standards. Poorly defined competency levels Poor enforcement and training/experience. Lack of clarity and transparency by enforcing authorities. Fire Deaths The latest figures from the Department for Communities and Local Government show that 294 people died in fires in England during 2015, an increase of 21% compared with the 242 deaths recorded in 2014 and the largest increase since figures were published in 2001-02. The rise comes after a decade in which the long-term trend in the death toll from fires fell, from a peak of 469 in 2003 and obviously don t take into account the Grenfell Tower Fire. Significant Fires There are a number of significant fires that I think highlight why the system doesn t work and these are just four that highlight the tragic loss of life, our heritage and to fire service personnel.

The Clandon Park Fire 2015 I looked at this investigation https://www.ifsecglobal.com/clandon-park-fire-questions-from-national-trust-member/ because I was a National Trust Member and would like to have seen what the NT investigation had to say and because I had some concerns about the FRS Report but even though I registered an official request and complaint the NT has never made this information available about what steps they took to protect our heritage neither did they address my complaint. Whilst there was no life loss in this fire it shows how difficult it is to get answers to questions raised by the media and public. The Cathedral Green Fire (Royal Clarence Hotel) 2016 This hotel was destroyed by a fire that started in Cathedral Green in Exeter and again it raised questions from the media and public that would not be answered. This was the article that I wrote https://www.ifsecglobal.com/royal-clarence-hotel-fire-destruction-uks-oldest-hotel/ unfortunately, we still don t have answers to these important questions. Lakanal House Fire 2009 Tragically, six people, including three children, died on the 10th and 11th floors. It is reported that those who died had been told to stay in their homes by 999 operators, who believed fire safety measures would be sufficient to prevent flames and smoke from reaching them . Southwark council admitted it failed to address fire risks at Lakanal House in Camberwell, south-east London, in the years leading up to the UK s worst ever tower block fire up to the 3 July 2009. Atherstone on Stour Warehouse Fire 2007 On 2 November 2007 a major fire occurred at a warehouse near the village of Atherstone on Stour in Warwickshire. Four firefighters from the Warwickshire Fire and Rescue Service were killed whilst tackling the blaze.

This was the largest loss of life for a fire brigade in the United Kingdom for 35 years. BBC Inside Out South West Investigation This is the third investigation that I have carried out for the BBC and this does not convince me that the level of fire safety is improving in fact quite the opposite. The BBC asked me to look at two hotels that had recently appeared on the Enforcement Register and the first one was so bad that I notified the FRS of my concerns because of a missing fire door at the head of the stairs and a fire exit that would not open. The second one had done some fire safety improvement work but still had many problems including combustible rubbish and compressed gas cylinders stored under an external fire escape, poor fire compartmentation and poorly fitting fire doors. The third hotel was one that I could see had carried out a lot of fire safety work but needed improvement because of poor housekeeping, unprotected escape routes, fire doors wedged open and poor electrical installation. It was also good that the hotel owner was very cooperative and agreed to action the items that I had raised. The fourth hotel was one that had not been covered in the TV programme but one that I had stayed in and this was a hotel that had a great 150 year history together with many fire safety problems these were just a few: Hotel bedroom fire door with lock removed Corridor fire door poorly fitting at head Poorly fitting fire door in corridor Unprotected window adjacent to external fire escape This is where both fire escapes meet note the portable building and ventilation plant under the common bridge and staircase. There were a lot more problems that I noted but I think that you can understand my concerns I did write to the hotel and the FRS and the hotel responded indicating that they wanted to resolve the problems. Clearly, this hotel would have had a Fire Certificate under the FP Act together with a number of Fire Risk Assessments under the RRO so how did we get to this position?

1. Looking at the hotel and the standard of fire safety I can clearly see what was done under the FP Act to gain a Fire Certificate and this would probably have included bedrooms fire doors and separation of the main stair case to allow people to by pass it.

2. It is rather more difficult to establish what has been done under the RRO as the standard does not appear to have changed a great deal but there may have been some upgrading of the fire alarm and automatic fire detection but this is just a guess.

3. Clearly, the biggest problem here is where to two fire escapes converge above the portable building and the associated ventilation plant below the one stair case as any fire here may render both escape routes useless. Unfortunately, in my travels I find many hotels with similar problems and this is why I feel that the RRO is not working.

During the course of the BBC investigation I stayed in 2 hotels and visited two more and all four had problems of varying concern including one where the FRS took 7 bedrooms out of use following my report because a fire door had been removed at the head of a stair case and a fire exit would not open. I was interesting to note that this hotel had recently been the subject of enforcement action. Where to now for fire safety? The last 10 years have seen some significant failures of our fire safety standards that have clearly not given us the level of fire safety that I feel are required in this day and age.We have seen significant failures in both life and property safety in the UK and whilst it is hoped that the outcome from the Grenfell Tower tragedy will provide an answer I think that with Brexit on the horizon we need to think about how we can overcome these problems with a more open and transparent fire safety regime that people can have confidence in. Having started my career in the age of fire certificates I am well aware of the advantages and disadvantages of this form of control and wonder if a combination of fire certificates and risk assessments may provide a better solution. This could take the form of a combined building control and fire certification authority that certified the building structure and approved the occupiers operational plan for its use. I does appear inconsistent in this day and age when we can go to a restaurant and find out its hygiene rating or buy a car and find out its crash rating but have no idea of the fire safety level of buildings that we stay/work in together with no way of establishing this. It would be nice to think that this information could be obtained by Freedom of Information (FOI) requests but the FRS are constrained by the Data Protection Act and are also using the response that they cannot provide this information because it may be used for acts of terrorism. I was recently trying to establish how many fire risk assessments that selected FRS had carried out in hotels and how many were found to be unsatisfactory and I was surprised at the variation in replies whilst a number gave me their figures, one indicated that they did not record this information and one required a payment of 450 for the information.

I would have personally thought that this was fairly basic information that should be easily available. I think that now is the time that the fire safety profession needs to get behind a scheme to improve fire safety to protect people and our heritage and not just to protect individual organisations or interests. Free Download: A Technical Guide to Fire Detection and Alarm Systems Fire legislation, which is written for the purpose of life safety, requires duty holders in non-domestic premises to assess fire risks and put in place arrangements for the prevention of fire and to protect people from fire when it occurs.

This guide provides an overview of the need to know information for fire detection and alarm systems and your legal requirements, key actions, key terms and more.

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BRE Global/LPCB Attack Testing Zone back for IFSEC 2018

Security is the biggest challenge the world is facing and the need to safeguard people and property has never been greater. You need to know the products and solutions you re making critical decisions on are fit for purpose, so IFSEC 2018 will once again partner the experts at BRE Global/LPCB to host the Attack Testing Zone. Following the hugely successful introduction of this new demonstration zone in 2017, the Attack Testing Zone will be expanded and moved to a prominent position in the Borders & Infrastructure area of IFSEC 2018, providing dramatic and energetic demonstrations of the capabilities of world class security solutions.

Expert technicians from BRE Global/ LPCB will actively demonstrate the effectiveness of a range of physical security solutions. All of the products on display are LPCB Red Book approved and will have met a range of UK and European standards, so you ll be watching top of the class products being taken to task in real time scenarios. Richard Flint, Physical Security Technical and Business Development Manager at BRE Global says: BRE Global is delighted to once again partner with IFSEC 2018 to continue with the Attack Testing Zone. We were hugely impressed at the volumes and quality of the visiting audience in 2017 and we made sure the IFSEC team expanded and relocated the Zone for 2018- such was the level of interest. It s a unique opportunity for security professionals to see leading products being tested in real time and showcases the levels of security and protection these solutions can provide . Gerry Dunphy, Brand Director, IFSEC & Firex International says: The Attack Testing Zone was the star performer at IFSEC 2017 with visiting customers standing four deep around the area just to get a view of what was going on. It s clearly a major area of interest so we re happy to follow Richard s lead and have expanded and relocated the Zone to an A-list position within the Borders & Infrastructure area of IFSEC 2018. The Attack Testing Zone is a great example of where real time demonstrations capture the imagination of the visiting audience and it adds to whole IFSEC experience. IFSEC International 2018 will take place between 19 th and 21 st June at London s ExCeL venue.

Co-located with Firex International, Safety & Health Expo and Facilities Show this blend of leading events provide security, safety and facilities professionals with an unrivalled opportunity to meet with suppliers, network with peers and drive agendas. Watch the Attack Testing Zone at IFSEC International 2017 embedded content Free Download: The key to mitigating cybersecurity risks Exploiting IoT technology without creating cybersecurity vulnerabilities is one of the defining challenges in today s security landscape. This report will help you to see why third parties should adhere to secure by design principles and why the necessary convergence of IT and security departments demands a holistic approach .

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Global public safety and security market forecast to grow to $537 billion by 2024

In its latest Global Public Safety and Security Market report, NK Wood Research projects the market to grow from $234.57 billion in 2016 to $537.20 billion by 2024. The growth will occur at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 10.91% between 2016 and 2024. According to the report s findings people and enterprises face continuous threats from cyber criminals, natural disasters, and terrorist attacks, which has boosted demand for public safety and security products and services globally.

Governments are contributing to the growth in demand for these goods and services. The global public safety and security market is segmented by products/solutions, services, verticals, and geographical regions. The solutions market is sub-segmented into critical communication networks, surveillance systems, biometric security, authentication systems, scanning and screening systems, C2/C4isr systems, emergency and disaster management, backup and recovery systems, public address and general alarms, and cyber security. Critical communication networks holds largest market share in the global public safety and security market and is expected to continue to be the biggest market over the forecast period. However the emergency and disaster management market is anticipated to grow at the fastest CAGR to 2024. The report splits the market regionally into North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and rest of world (ROW). North America was the highest revenue-generating region in 2016, due to spending on defence, compared with other countries. The report anticipates that the riot control equipment market will grow in the US, following the rise in the number of cases of violent related crimes in North America, especially US. This is partly due to availability of guns and rise in violence among street gangs.

Asia Pacific is expected to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period. Japan has been the site of some of the worst natural disasters of the 21st century, a phenomenon that has led to the growth of the public safety and security market in the region. Free Download: The key to mitigating cybersecurity risks Exploiting IoT technology without creating cybersecurity vulnerabilities is one of the defining challenges in today s security landscape.

This report will help you to see why third parties should adhere to secure by design principles and why the necessary convergence of IT and security departments demands a holistic approach .

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Nominations open for UK OSPAs

Nominations are now open for the second UK Outstanding Security Performance Awards (OSPAs), which will take place in London on March 1. The UK OSPAs the first of which took place earlier this year recognise and reward companies and individuals across the security industry. The awards are held in eight countries and aim to be both independent and inclusive, by providing an opportunity for chosen nominees and winners, whether buyers or suppliers, to be recognised and their success to be celebrated.

The criteria for the awards are based on extensive research into key factors that contribute to and characterise outstanding performance. Perpetuity Research has contributed to the creation of the criteria. The OSPAs are organised in collaboration with security associations and groups in the countries they take place in, with standardised award categories and criteria. Nominations are open until the November 13 2017. Submissions are invited in several categories. These include: Outstanding In-House Security Team , Outstanding In-House Security Manager , Outstanding Contract Security Company , Outstanding Security Consultant and Outstanding Customer Service Initiative . Entry to the UK OSPAs is free and is open to companies, teams and individuals who have performed at an exceptional level. The nomination process is simple with only two questions to answer. A panel of leading industry figures will select award winners from finalists and the UK OSPAs will be presented at a prestigious awards dinner to be held at the Royal Lancaster, London on March 1 2018.

For more information about entering the OSPAs see here Free Download: The key to mitigating cybersecurity risks Exploiting IoT technology without creating cybersecurity vulnerabilities is one of the defining challenges in today s security landscape.

This report will help you to see why third parties should adhere to secure by design principles and why the necessary convergence of IT and security departments demands a holistic approach .

Download now Related Topics Finalists announced for the Security & Fire Excellence Awards 2017 Young professionals: Share your fire-safety ideas and jumpstart your career (and maybe win a prize) Benchmark Innovation Awards 2017: winners revealed

National Cyber Security Centre marks first year of protecting the UK

In the last 12 months cyber experts within the new National Cyber Security Centre received 1,131 incident reports, with 590 classed as significant . A report published to mark the first anniversary of the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) highlights the work undertaken by the organisation to help improve the safety and security of online activities and transactions in the UK. The NCSC, which is part of GCHQ, exists as a single, one stop shop for UK cyber security.

The centre acknowledges there is still a lot of work to be done but points out the progress in the first 12 months, which includes preventing thousands of attacks, providing support for the UK Armed Forces and managing hundreds of incidents. The NCSC has also helped to foster a pipeline of the next generation of experts and is working with businesses and universities to nurture technology for tackling cybercrime. According to Jeremy Fleming, director of GCHQ, cyber is playing an increasingly important part in daily lives and in the UK s approach to security, with threats evolving rapidly as technology advances. Our response has been to transform to stay ahead of them. The NCSC is a pivotal part of that transformation. It is a critical component not only of GCHQ, where it benefits from the data and expertise it has access to as part of the intelligence community, but of how the government as a whole works to keep the UK safe, Fleming said. Free Download: the CyberSecurity Crashcourse Are you even aware if you have been the victim of a cybersecurity breach?

This report will help you to find out and protect yourself, Eric Hansleman from 451 Research presents a rapid-fire overview of cybersecurity , because a firewall just won t do, you need multi-layered defences to truly protect your data.

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Global anti-drone market to be worth $1,205 million by 2025

A study, published by Transparency Market Research (TMR), predicts the anti-drone market worldwide to be worth $1,205 million by 2025. Players, big and small, joining the global anti-drone market suggests a dynamic and competitive industry in the coming years, according to the report. The emergence of start-ups with innovative technologies and approaches is expected to disrupt the market and intensify competition among manufacturers of anti-drones in the future.

A report by TMR evaluated the global anti-drone market to be worth $214.7 million in 2016. The market is expected to grow with a 19.9% compound annual growth rate between 2017 and 2025. Government and military dominate the end-user segments with the military predicted to grow rapidly among all end-use segments, followed by the government. In terms of anti-drone technologies, neutralizing systems held the leading share in the market in 2016. North America is expected to display the leading growth over the forecast period. Firms operating in the global anti-drone market include Blighter Surveillance Systems, Dedrone Detect, Droneshield, Boeing, Lockheed Martin Corporation, SAAB and Theiss UAV Solutions. Free Download: The security drones report 2017 The global security drones market will be worth $10.5bn ( 8bn) by 2020 . This report commissioned by Aviat Drones examines the prevalence, growth prospects , applications and regulatory challenges of drones and anti-drone tech in the global security market. Find out how you can benefit from this lucrative market .

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We find the needle in the haystack and fast

As well as enhancing safety and security, Qognify solutions distill mountains of data into meaningful intelligence to optimise business processes, cut costs and reduce the risk, and mitigate the impact, of shutdowns and service disruptions. The company sells solutions for airports, rail, traffic management, utilities, the financial sector and other environments where even minor setbacks can cost millions of pounds in lost revenue or cause major economic disruption. We spoke to Moti Shabtai, Qognify CEO and president, about the company s suite of big-data solutions, including Qblock, Suspect Search and Operational Intelligence Center.

IFSEC Global: Please tell us about your Operational Intelligence Center? Moti Shabtai: The Operational Intelligence Center (OIC) can be described as a big data machine that sits on top of our Qognify Situator PSIM solution and provides intelligence to the security team, the operational team, the executive suite as well as the wider organisation. It correlates huge amounts of data to give a snapshot overview, along with deep insight into how the organisation is performing. Using the OIC, an airport can run predictive analytics to assess what would happen if a runway were to be closed One sector where the OIC is proving very popular is airports. They are measured on how many connections airlines choose to have through their airport versus another. If they re not providing a good service, it costs airlines money and therefore they may choose to go with another airport. So, knowing your response times, whether you are meeting your service level agreements and being aware of the number and the root cause of flights being diverted, is vitally important. Using the OIC, an airport can run predictive analytics to assess what would happen if a runway is to be closed. How would it impact the capacity to contain landings?

When would planes need to be diverted because the airport can t absorb more landings? We have been working with one of the biggest airports in the world that is using the OIC to check how it is performing and how it is trending against its own KPIs as well as how to predict what may happen if the airport continues on a certain trend. IG: Where other than airports is the OIC useful? MS: The OIC is ideal for any mission-critical environments where the cost of business obstruction is very high. So airports, mass transit, seaports, financial institutions and utilities are key sectors for the solution. Also, smart cities initiatives around the world, where we are having conversations with governments and mayors, looking at how they can improve safety and security for their citizens, but also to optimise essential city infrastructure such as telecoms, water supply, sewer systems and traffic management. We take a sea of data which is getting bigger all the time and turn it into usable intelligence For example, we have a city that uses OIC and Situator to handle tickets for traffic violations. It has tripled the number of tickets by automating the process and making it much more efficient! So, Qognify Situator is the solution that enables operators or managers to manage situations and incidents, whereas the OIC focuses on operational intelligence and performance.

IG: Please tell us a bit about Qblock MS: Qblock is a converged IT solution for mass video storage. It s meant for those mission-critical organisations that cannot afford to lose anything and are seeking a zero-failure solution. They appreciate the benefits that network-attached storage is providing. IG: Do Qognify solutions deploy machine learning or deep learning? MS: Yes, our Suspect Search video analytics application is heavily based on both deep learning and neural networks, to analyse huge amounts of people and create a digital signature of whoever you are. IG: What kind of sectors or adjacent areas might you want to diversify into? MS: We are open to any opportunities to do with big data that complements our solution. We re a software company that specialises in finding the needle in the haystack and fast. We take a sea of data and that sea is getting bigger and bigger all the time and turn it into information and usable intelligence.

Free Download: Securing the UK s borders. Getting national security and Brexit right first time is crucial , we do not want to get this wrong. This report considers the implications of leaving the EU for the management of the UK s borders and making it as easy as possible for international business to thrive and legitimate movement to occur in a post-Brexit UK.

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The 10 musts of museum access control and one technology that does them all

When Munch s The Scream was stolen from an Oslo museum in 1994, the thieves left a handwritten postcard. It read: Thanks for the poor security. As that famous heist and others show, every exhibit risks theft, damage, vandalism or terrorism both carefully planned and opportunistic.

In 2008, a gallery in Z rich lost artworks by Monet, C zanne, Degas and van Gogh in under five minutes. According to the FBI, less than five percent of stolen masterpieces are ever recovered. Evidence suggests most thefts occur where security systems are inadequate. Within a multi-layered system, effective access control can play a key role in ensuring the worst does not happen whether in a heritage property with historic architecture to maintain, or in a modern building where contemporary security blends in easily. The basic principles of access control are well established: only authorised people should have access to display or storage areas, only at times that can be defined in advance, and only within a system that can identify exactly who went where, and when. Traditional mechanical lock-and-key systems cannot accomplish this at least, not without a huge admin burden on security staff. But modern, electronic wireless access control has the functionality and flexibility to achieve it, if a simple checklist of 10 musts is covered: Is your system comprehensive, covering all doors and other openings, including basements, storage areas and the roof? Are locks certified for resistance to physical attack (e.g. anti-picking technology)?

Can any compromised lock be re-keyed and/or replaced instantly? Is key tracking straightforward so you always know who exactly has keys or access permissions, and can amend those permissions quickly? Are full audit trails easy to generate, detailing who has gone where, and when? Have you minimised the number of keys in circulation, and only issue them based on need, not convenience or seniority? Can you offer fine-grained levels of access to different site users as required? Are your physical keys protected against unauthorised copying? Is remote unlocking or locking of the main door enabled if there s an emergency? Are locks and other devices discreet enough to maintain a property s appearance (castle treasury, country house, historic theatre, church sacristy, and so on)? CLIQ has the credentials for national heritage CLIQ is a locking system which combines high-end mechanical and electronic protection.

A range of key-operated cylinders maximise physical security. CLIQ technology then adds an extra layer of encrypted, user-friendly electronic security on top. Security managers at Berlin s Deutsches Theater chose CLIQ to protect their historic premises, an icon of 19 th -century Neoclassical architecture. The theatre s new system integrates CLIQ s cutting-edge microelectronics with a high-quality mechanical cylinder system. Security staff simply program each CLIQ key with the exact access rights its user needs. Fine-grained permission schedules, right down to the individual door, can be set for every employee and contractor. Using straightforward system software, any CLIQ key can be scheduled to permit entry only at pre-set times during public opening times, for example, or after hours for cleaning staff. Permission updates are communicated from system to door via CLIQ programming keys. Because CLIQ locks are wireless, no major alterations were needed to existing door hardware or building aesthetics a critical feature when refitting an historic property like the Deutsches Theater.

In Sweden, Stockholm s Vasamuseet also upgraded an old mechanical system to CLIQ . Staff used to carry heavy keychains with 10 or more keys. Now facility managers can amend the access rights of everyone s single CLIQ key at any time, even remotely. Previously, the biggest problem was lost keys, says Michael Andr sen, Operations and Security Officer at the State Maritime Museums, Sweden. Then the lock had to be replaced, which was expensive. With CLIQ , a lost key s access rights are simply removed, instantly, and it no longer opens any doors. With CLIQ , it s clear where our keys are. Making museums more cost-efficient CLIQ can be installed from scratch or retro-fitted to existing mechanical locks. Once CLIQ has been installed, administrators can immediately de-authorise a lost key or change a key s permissions, at any time and from anywhere.

Only genuine CLIQ keys with a valid software authorization will open a CLIQ lock, eliminating any potential risks from stolen or copied keys. Returns on security investment for museums are often measured in what doesn t happen. CLIQ , however, also has a positive impact on workflows, saving time and money. By eliminating the need for physical key handover, CLIQ removes delays caused by logistical bottlenecks. When facility needs change, site users simply update their key with programming devices or via an encrypted Bluetooth connection to their CLIQ Connect mobile phone app. It s enough to make an art thief scream. ASSA ABLOY sells and supports CLIQ technology under several locking brands, including IKON, ABLOY, Mul-T-Lock, ASSA, Vachette, FAB and KESO. About ASSA ABLOY ASSA ABLOY is the global leader in door opening solutions, dedicated to satisfying end-user needs for security, safety and convenience. Since its formation in 1994, ASSA ABLOY has grown from a regional company into an international group with about 47,000 employees, operations in more than 70 countries and sales close to SEK 71 billion.

In the fast-growing electromechanical security segment, the Group has a leading position in areas such as access control, identification technology, entrance automation and hotel security.

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