Security News And Views

Library Reference – Security News And Views

HD cameras to replace control tower in ground-breaking revamp at London City Airport

Case study In what is believed to be a first for a UK airport, a remote monitoring system based on high definition video cameras is to replace the physical control tower at London City Airport. The digital air traffic control tower will be operated some 100 miles from the airport at a new control room in Swanwick, Hampshire and will be managed by NATS, the air traffic control service. High definition cameras The system developed by Saab Digital Air Traffic Solutions in conjunction with the Swedish air traffic control service, LFV will consist of a new unmanned tower, at the top of which will be 14 high definition and two PTZ cameras.

The cameras will combine to provide a full 360-degree view of the airfield just like that provided by a conventional tower but at a level of detail greater than the human eye and with new viewing tools that, it s claimed, will modernise and improve air traffic management. The images will be viewed at a new facility which will resemble a modern CCTV control room at the NATS site in Swanwick, which also controls the skies over southern England. The control room will feature a curved video wall of screens, with images stitched together to provide a virtual, panoramic view of the airport. embedded content The realism will be enhanced with an audio feed from the airfield and radar readings from the skies above London, to instruct aircraft and oversee movements. Saab says it started developing the digital air traffic solution in response to the need to provide a more efficient way of handling air traffic control, particularly for smaller airports where air traffic control can account for 30-40% of operating costs. The remote solution means that air traffic control costs can be shared, with a number of airports being managed simultaneously or according to demand at any particular time. The first digital control tower was established at rnsk ldsvik airport in northern Sweden as recently as 2015, with Sundsvall airport being added later and a third airport, Link ping, up and running by summer 2017. The control room in Sundsvall features a large row of 55-inch screens showing a window-like panoramic view of each airport. Difficult light conditions The camera technology actually makes it easier for air traffic controllers to cope with difficult light conditions, such as direct sunlight or reflections from snow, so they can follow an aircraft that is climbing without being dazzled.

Other types of data, such as weather and wind force, can be integrated into the same view on the screen, providing a more enhanced situational awareness. Not only does the remote air traffic control system comply with existing regulations but it also enables the further enhancement of safety, according to Per Ahl, sales director at Saab Digital Air Traffic Solutions. This is because: Cameras can provide better night vision Advanced image processing can detect potential dangers such as equipment left on the airfield Target tracking technology via radar and camera can detect and highlight incoming aircraft, making it easier for air traffic controllers to monitor them Information overlaid on screen can display everything from weather and visibility to the identity of aircraft and vehicles. The cameras also feature specially designed metal housings to prevent image interference on the lens from insects and small animals. Enhanced situational awareness The image viewing is combined with other systems which controllers use to manage air traffic, such as radar displays, navigation aids and information about flight plans. By combining LFV s unique operational experience with Saab s world class technology solutions, we can drive the whole process forward from planning to commissioning remote air traffic control, said Johan Klintberg, CEO of Saab Digital Air Traffic Solutions. We offer smart digital solutions so that data can be used in several locations to streamline traffic flows around an airport, both in the air and on the ground. As we are pioneering digital air traffic management, the market has shown large interest in our products and services. Mike Stoller, Director of Airports at NATS, said: Digital towers are going to transform the way air traffic services are provided at airports by providing real safety, operational and efficiency benefits.

We are delighted that London City Airport has chosen to work with us to deliver what will be the first of its kind in the UK. High-rise cameras The 50-metre camera tower which will be located in the airport s long-stay car park in line with the mid-way point of the runway was approved by the London Borough of Newham in December 2016. Construction of the tower is due to be completed in 2018, followed by more than a year of testing and training, during which the existing tower will continue to operate. The digital tower will become fully operational in 2019. London City Airport which this year turns 30 years old is also beginning a 350m development programme to help cater for an extra two million passengers a year by 2025. Facilities will include seven new aircraft stands to accommodate next generation aircraft, a parallel taxiway to maximise runway capacity, and an extension to the passenger terminal. Free download: The video surveillance report 2017 Sponsored by IDIS The Video Surveillance Report 2017 covers all things video surveillance based on a poll of hundreds of security professionals.

Specifically looking at topics such as open platforms, 4K, low-light cameras, video analytics, warranties and this year due to the growing threat posed, the cybersecurity landscape.

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Construction fire safety: Bull Products upgrades first-responder stations with height-extending detector

Bull Products, which specialises in developing life-safety equipment for the construction industry, says its revamped first-responder stations will cut costs for contractors and construction companies. Based on its on-site investigations into the effectiveness of existing processes and equipment, Bull Products has added an optional, height-extending pole to the stations. Designed to attach to the back of the First Responder Stations, the addition makes detection installation quicker and reduces costs, as wireless detectors are not required, says the company.

The pole can be raised to a height of over three metres with a detector attached to the top, and it can be adjusted to position the detector at any height between 2.1 and 3.2 metres from the ground. The stations, which incorporate fire extinguishers and a Cygnus fire alarm, are fully mobile. In contrast, conventional heat and smoke detectors are fixed to ceilings or walls using ladders or podiums, creating a safety risk for those installing them. Matthew Trigwell, Sales Director at Bull Products, said: We re continuously looking at ways to solve issues within the industry and improve our products to make lives easier for construction companies and M & E contractors. This height-extending detector will not only improve safety for our customers on construction sites but it will provide a time-saving and efficient solution. This new feature comes with a heat detector as default, but smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are also available should these be required. The detector is hard wired to the alarm through a spare input and is only compatible with the following Cygnus alarms, CYG2 and CYG2/85DB. Free download: The video surveillance report 2017 Sponsored by IDIS The Video Surveillance Report 2017 covers all things video surveillance based on a poll of hundreds of security professionals. Specifically looking at topics such as open platforms, 4K, low-light cameras, video analytics, warranties and this year due to the growing threat posed, the cybersecurity landscape.

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Grenfell: Drip-drip of revelations exposes UK complacency following decades of fire-safety progress

Photo: Brandon Butterworth under CC4.0 Until this year, fire deaths in England and Wales had been falling steadily for three decades. Between 2004 and 2014 fire deaths fell by 40%. Both in its sophistication and implementation, the fire-safety discipline has improved beyond measure since the 1980s.

Rules are now in place that you hardly need a degree in fire engineering to recognise as basic common sense. Their absence 30 years ago betrays a now shocking disregard for fire risk. Just consider that smoking was permitted in train carriages until 1984 and on London underground platforms until 1987, with a trial ban made permanent following the Kings Cross fire that killed 31 people and injured 100. And the circumstances surrounding the fire that killed 56 football supporters at Bradford City s Valley Parade stadium on 11 May 1985 are unbelievable. The stand that caught fire was made of timber and this at a time when supporters were allowed to smoke freely on the terraces. More incomprehensibly still, litter had been allowed to pile up beneath the stand a ready-made bonfire just awaiting ignition. A copy of the Bradford Telegraph and Argus was found, dated 4 November 1968. Such tragedies prompted the authorities to take health and safety and fire safety rather more seriously and fire deaths have been falling ever since. Small wonder that a government committed to slashing the deficit saw the fire service as an obvious target for cuts.

The firefighter s role was also expanded to encompass traffic accidents, terror attacks and major floods. We might have been full of post-Empire, pre-Brexit anxieties about our economic status and cultural identity, but we were good at fire safety and health and safety. While hundreds of workers have died in the construction of facilities for the Qatar World Cup, not a single fatality was recorded in the building of London 2012 venues. When a series of fires broke out in tall buildings dotting the skyline in Dubai in 2015 and 2016, many in the UK might have sneered at the emirate s complacency over fire standards. And yet, despite their frequency, not a single person died in those blazes. By horrific contrast, the death toll from the Grenfell blaze, though still not finalised, will surely represent the worst loss of life in a single fire in living memory. We are as a nation much more humble about our fire safety record since 14 June 2017. If the UK government forgot about the Lakanal disaster all too readily, it will be harder to expunge this one from the collective memory. The harrowing stories of people throwing children out of windows on upper level floors are not easily forgotten.

And the charred remains of Grenfell fire, visible from miles around, stand as a lasting monument to the complacency, incompetence and disregard of so many involved in the protection and management of social housing. But if others had been surprised that such a thing could happen, those in the industry were less so. Many voices in the fire industry had been warning, with increasing exasperation, for years about the multiple deficiencies in the fire-safety situation with high-rise residential blocks. More than a month on from the worst fire disaster in living memory, the shortcomings and instances of neglect continue to mount, dispelling any lingering complacency after decades of falling numbers of fire deaths. Timber frame fears The Grenfell fire has brought into sharp focus the materials favoured by the modern construction industry. As the scale of the cladding problem continues to worsen, fire-engineering experts are now warning that timber frames, which are the most popular building method for social housing, are also problematic. Speaking to the Guardian, Arnold Tarling, a chartered surveyor, said: I worry it will take more losses of life before people take this seriously, because nobody ever learns. With buildings like this, everything has to be perfect with the build to make them safe, and then afterwards, he said. At the moment we ve got a lot of modern materials, and a lot of materials being put together, and the regulations just haven t kept up.

The structural issues that once necessitated a 7-8 storey limit on the height of timber-frame buildings are no longer an issue thanks to innovations in construction methods. One timber-frame building planned for construction in east London will have nine floors, while a proposal for a 300-metre-high wood-framed skyscraper. The US, where timber frames are widespread, specifies height and area restrictions and mandates the installation of sprinklers systems neither of which apply in the UK. Timber frames can be perfectly safe. The problem arises when corners are cut, resulting in gaps in the timber frame, which is encased into a sealed void between external bricks and internal plasterboard walls. Jim Glockling, technical director of the Fire Protection Association, told the Guardian: We shouldn t be scaremongering. A properly put-together timber-frame building should perform well but it s about having the methods and quality assurance in place. There s a difference between what you are allowed to do through building regulations and what you should do. Residents themselves can undermine the effectiveness of compartmentalisation by drilling holes in a wall to mount shelves or a TV.

The problems of timber frames extends beyond the theoretical. One blaze caused by a discarded cigarette at flats in Hounslow, west London, destroyed 16 homes and caused the collapse of the building roof. And a Manchester block of flats was demolished six days after a fire broke out so fire crews could be certain it was fully extinguished. Electricity surges It has also emerged that 25 Grenfell Tower residents had experienced electricity power that caused appliances to malfunction, overheat and even emit smoke. Based on documents it had obtained, the BBC reported that some of the problems, reported several years before, had still not been resolved in the months leading up to the fire. The Grenfell fire is believed to have started when a fridge freezer caught fire on the fourth floor. More cladding revelations Given the rapid spread of the fire up the building s exterior, it was immediately apparent that the cladding on Grenfell Tower was woefully inadequate from a fire protection perspective. Worse still, in the days and weeks that followed, government tests revealed that cladding from a huge proportion of high rise residential buildings was similarly deficient. The latest damaging revelation comes from University of Leeds.

A team of researchers has found that burning cladding on Grenfell Tower would have released 14 times more heat than government tests allow. Although contractors who fitted the cladding insist that it passed all regulations, the researchers concluded that the cladding s plastic core would have burned as quickly as petrol . According to data released by French authorities, e cladding would have released 43.2 MJ/kg of heat. The European A2 standard for limited combustibility is 3 MJ/kg. The foam insulation underneath the cladding was, separately, thought to emit around 26 MJ/kg of heat.

Advanced launches peripheral expansion network node for more flexible, configurable networking

Fire systems Advanced claims its latest new product makes networking more flexible and configurable than ever. The PENN (peripheral expansion network node) is a card and network node that accommodates Advanced s range of peripheral input and output cards anywhere on the network, and up to 1.5km from the nearest fire panel or next PENN node. Covering everything from input, interface and i/o cards to relay, sounder, LED and switch cards, up to 32 peripheral cards can be attached to a PENN and 199 PENNs can be added to a network.

More than 6,000 peripheral cards can therefore be added almost anywhere around the network. Until now, peripheral cards could only be connected to a fire panel s P-BUS although Advanced stresses that this remains an option and no more distant than 10 metres from the panel. Advanced s ease-of-use and the power and resilience of its networking are already well understood and admired, says Aston Bowles, head of marketing at Advanced. The PENN provides our customers with more freedom, even simpler installation, and configuration that improves performance and reduces installation costs. Freeing the peripheral cards from the panel is a good idea, but the creative ways our customers are using the PENN and peripheral cards to solve installation and configuration challenges is genuinely surprising, and we re seeing it used on all manner and sizes of projects.

The PENN is currently compatible with Advanced s MxPro multiprotocol panels and Axis EN fire systems.

Digital Barriers launches first live facial recognition system for body-worn cameras

law enforcement Digital Barriers has launched the world s first live facial recognition system for body-worn law enforcement cameras. SmartVis Identifier, which brings together Digital Barriers video-streaming platform EdgeVis and analytics solution SmartVis, is targeted at the defence, security and law enforcement markets. It provides real-time facial recognition against multiple watch lists and databases.

Already available for standard smartphones, SmartVis has been adapted to run live on Digital Barriers body-worn cameras that are designed for frontline law enforcement. SmartVis facial recognition has been designed to do the job that traditional facial recognition systems cannot: to work in the real world, in real time, says Zak Doffman, CEO of Digital Barriers. Never before has frontline policing been offered live facial recognition on the type of everyday body worn cameras now being widely deployed. Customers at the forefront of security and defence have already deployed this technology and describe it as a game-changer . embedded content Able only to record, not live stream, footage, most body-worn devices are effective for evidence management after the fact, but cannot aid in the protection of officers if they are put in harms way as incidents unfold. EdgeVis delivers low latency and low bandwidth streaming, including over-the-air access to device recordings and GPS locational data. SmartVis Identifier supports, when required, every interaction, every stop and search, every arrest with real-time facial recognition. Digital Barriers says the solution removes human error and plugs resourcing gaps, thereby broadening the scope of facial recognition deployments. SmartVis Identifier will be available alongside EdgeVis on Digital Barriers body-worn devices and for selected service providers and camera/device manufacturers under licence.

Digital Barriers provides zero-latency streaming and analysis of secure video and related intelligence over wireless networks. To reduce bandwidth consumption the company harnesses a mixture of cellular, satellite, IP mesh and cloud networks. Founded in 2009, the company has its origins in military applications but now sells fixed and mobile solutions for covert, remote and wide-area deployments to law enforcement and the commercial security industry too. Free download: The video surveillance report 2017 Sponsored by IDIS The Video Surveillance Report 2017 covers all things video surveillance based on a poll of hundreds of security professionals. Specifically looking at topics such as open platforms, 4K, low-light cameras, video analytics, warranties and this year due to the growing threat posed, the cybersecurity landscape.

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BAFE issues revised fire extinguisher servicing competency scheme document

BAFE has revised its fire extinguisher maintenance/service scheme and BAFE SP101:2017 this is now available via the BAFE website. Coming into effect from 1 October 2017 the updated scheme seeks to better define what constitutes competence in the provision of fire extinguisher services and updates the role of the fire extinguisher technician. BAFE launched a review of the scheme in April 2016 after a lengthy consultation period.

Further elements of technical competence have been added to revised sections of BS 5306 (fire extinguishing installations and equipment on premises), while BAFE-registered fire extinguisher technicians are now required to undertake training in asbestos awareness and health and safety procedures. The technician competency portfolio used by BAFE assessors has also been reviewed. Passing the BS 5306 exam is now only the first step in demonstrating a grasp of relevant standards. A dual route to competency has been created. From 1 October 2017, organisations can gain third-party certification through either an ISO9001 or a management system route.

The same audit criteria is applied in both instances.

Cyber-attack could cost global economy more than costliest natural disaster in US history, says Lloyds

Cyber insurance Hurricane Katrina at peak intensity in the Gulf of Mexico on 28 August 2005 Lloyd s of London has warned that a major cyber-attack could cause problems that cost as much as $120bn ( 92bn) to rectify. To put that into some sort of context, Hurricane Katrina the costliest natural disaster in US history, no less caused $108bn worth of property damage. Lloyds of London, the world s oldest insurer, has published a 56-page report that reveals how the potential cost of cyber-attacks has spiralled in recent years.

A malicious hack that takes down a cloud service provider is cited the most likely scenario, with estimated losses ranging from $15bn to $121bn, with the average being $53bn. This report gives a real sense of the scale of damage a cyber-attack could cause the global economy, said Lloyds CEO Inga Beale. Just like some of the worst natural catastrophes, cyber events can cause a severe impact on businesses and economies, trigger multiple claims and dramatically increase insurers claims costs. Underwriters need to consider cyber cover in this way and ensure that premium calculations keep pace with the cyber-threat reality. With average potential losses of $28.7bn, the next-most likely attack, according to Lloyds research, is the breach of computer operating systems run by a huge number of organisations around the globe. Uninsured gap Many such losses would not be insured. Lloyds has identified an uninsured gap of $45bn in the cloud services setting and $26bn for the latter scenario that makes the prospect of such attacks more alarming still. As for the most vulnerable sectors, financial services tops the rankings in terms of vulnerability, followed by software and technology, hospitality and retail. After that comes healthcare, in which the consequences could be especially grave.

The NHS was hit by a ransomware attack recently. A recent white paper from the US-based Institute for Critical Infrastructure Technology (ICIT) concluded that the healthcare sector is the most vulnerable and least equipped to defend against hackers. Last year we published an infographic detailing the rise of healthcare hacks and advice on how to secure data in the healthcare industry. Saudi Aramco, which supplies 10% of the world s oil, suffered what CNN Tech described as the world s worst hack in 2012. Although the total costs attributable to the ensuing chaos and salvage operation have not been estimated indeed, the hack was not reported widely it apparently destroyed 35,000 computers and sent the entire business into near-meltdown. It was only the bottomless oil wealth of the owners that staved off bankruptcy. A recent survey of 257 benchmarked organizations conducted by the Ponemon Institute revealed that the average annual cost in damages from cyberattacks amounted to $7.6m. Cyber insurance is a relatively new form of insurance and is trickier to model than cover for natural catastrophes. However, if cyber-attacks are seen by Lloyds as potentially comparable with natural disasters when it comes to costs, it nevertheless believes that climactic problems pose the biggest long-term risk.

From year to year, risk varies relatively little but climate change in the end will be far larger as a risk, said Trevor Maynard, Lloyd s head of innovation and co-author of the report with cybersecurity firm Cyence. It affects the global economic structure, food, water. It s like trying to turn a supertanker around we can t start in 30 years when things are going bad, we have to start now. Free Download: the Cyber Security Crashcourse This report contains 40 slides packed with insight into the trends shaping the industry and how you can protect yourself. Eric Hansleman from 451 Research presents a rapid-fire overview of cyber security.

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MOBOTIX completes Mx6 6MP camera series with new indoor models

product launch MOBOTIX has added new indoor models c26, i26, p26 and v26 to the Mx6 6MP camera line. The German surveillance brand says it marks the completion of the Mx6 series, which it launched earlier in the year. The Mx6 series is a major departure for MOBOTIX as it accommodates the video compression industry standard H.264 for the first time.

Features (across all four models) Processor delivers up to twice as many images per second, at the same resolution, as previous models Video data simultaneously offered in three formats (MxPEG, MJPEG and H.264), as well as a range of resolutions RTSP/multicast enhances flexibility Intelligent motion detection within camera affords spare capacity for additional software applications Available with more powerful CPU H.264 encoder New processor architecture has boosted frame rate and capacity to capture rapid movement Video stream can be displayed on multiple clients simultaneously without compromising frame rate H.264 compression standard format available on MOBOTIX cameras for the first time Users can toggle between high image quality with MxPEG and where video transmission and camera integration is problematic the lower quality industry standard Basic ONVIF functions offered 6-megapixel moonlight sensors Low light performance of > 1 Lux How the models compare c26 is the smallest and lightest MOBOTIX 360 camera yet: 12cm diameter and 200 grams weight. Therefore effective for rapid ceiling mounting in suspended ceilings i26 is also compact and discrete, so suited to corresponding wall mounting. Tilt angle of 15 means the camera can get the kind of complete coverage that would otherwise need four cameras p26 offers flexibility during installation thanks to manual swivel and tilt functions. And 90 lens means total room coverage can be achieved from a corner position v26 is the first vandalism-proof indoor camera to offer all MOBOTIX functions. On-wall audio set and vandalism sets provide robust protection. Mobotix says We will continue to remain true to our decentralized concept storing maximum intelligence in a camera and thereby offer solutions that go above and beyond traditional applications, said MOBOTIX CTO Dr Oliver Gabel. At the same time, we are open to generally used technologies such as H.264 and participation in standard forums such as ONVIF. We do not consider these two parts of our approach to be in conflict with each other; instead, they help our range prepare for the future and stay solution-oriented. About MOBOTIX MOBOTIX was founded in Germany in 1999.

The German IP camera and software specialists has made a name for itself developing the first decentralised IP camera and supplying the Mount Everest webcam. Contrary to popular perception as a hardware provider, the company sees itself as a software specialist with in-house hardware development of digital, high-resolution and network-based video security. It produces complete systems using a single source. Free download: The video surveillance report 2017 Sponsored by IDIS The Video Surveillance Report 2017 covers all things video surveillance based on a poll of hundreds of security professionals. Specifically looking at topics such as open platforms, 4K, low-light cameras, video analytics, warranties and this year due to the growing threat posed, the cybersecurity landscape.

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The future of video surveillance amid the rise of artificial intelligence

A vast majority of recorded video data is never viewed. This isn t for a lack of interesting content or inadequate resources, but rather a gradual decline in human attention spans. Adding more cameras increases the amount of video data collected, but if it s not viewed, the useful information is missed.

There is an imbalance between the amount of video data collected and the human attention available to effectively mine that data. As security technology continues to evolve, exciting developments are taking place with the inclusion of artificial intelligence (AI). Powerful tools are being created that will allow us to modify our approach to video search. Site-wide intelligence Effective search uses a wealth of data to find necessary information. A person conducting a search needs to answer who, what, when and where, not just in the context of a single camera, but across an entire site. This is where the need for AI comes in. Avigilon Appearance Search video analytics technology is a sophisticated deep learning AI search engine for video data. It sorts through hours of footage to quickly locate a specific person or vehicle across all cameras on a site. With this technology, users can initiate a search by simply clicking on a button and selecting to search for all instances of a person or vehicle of interest across recorded video.

embedded content Looking to the future Using AI in video search can help reduce hours of work to minutes, managing resources so that site security is more effective and efficient. The continued evolution of AI will provide security personnel with even more powerful tools not just for forensic purposes, but for real time event response. By designing video surveillance search technology to be as simple to use as searching the internet, Avigilon is better focusing human attention on what matters most, to dramatically change the way users interact with their security systems.

Avigilon Appearance Search technology is a sophisticated deep learning AI search engine that enables users to quickly locate a specific person or vehicle of interest across an entire site. Free download: The video surveillance report 2017 Sponsored by IDIS The Video Surveillance Report 2017 covers all things video surveillance based on a poll of hundreds of security professionals. Specifically looking at topics such as open platforms, 4K, low-light cameras, video analytics, warranties and this year due to the growing threat posed, the cybersecurity landscape.

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How to develop a fire-risk management strategy

Where fire is concerned, honesty is the best policy, strategy and procedure. That was the message in an article I authored last year which focused on the importance of fire policy. What amounts to fire policy, fire risk management strategy and procedure is not thoroughly understood and many people responsible for fire safety within organisations or individual buildings struggle to get it right.

Following the release of BS 9999: 2017, which contains a revised section 4 entitled Designing for the management of fire risk , I thought it might be worthwhile sharing some thoughts on how to craft fire risk management strategy. In this article I ll answer the following questions: What is a fire risk management strategy? Why it is useful to have one? Who might be tasked with developing one? When might one be required? How should it be structured? What is a fire risk management strategy? As the title would suggest a fire risk management strategy is focused towards the management of fire risk. There are some subtle differences between a fire strategy and a fire risk management strategy.

A fire strategy report describes the fire safety issues and how they are addressed. It acts as a guide for the design team, by identifying standards or setting performance criteria eg for the capacity of a smoke extract system and/or the fire resistance of elements of structure. It is the basis of the submission to the approving authorities ie building control body and fire authority. A concept fire strategy report will evolve through the design process being refined and expanded as the project progresses with a view to becoming an as-built fire strategy for use throughout the building s life cycle. The term fire-risk management strategy was defined in PAS 7: 2013 as a document which defines an organisations fire risk management system and method of implementing the overarching policy . A fire risk management strategy can be developed for an organisation responsible for a single building or an organisation with responsibility for a multi-site portfolio. Why it is useful to have one? When designing fire risk management into buildings there is great benefit in providing building occupiers and/or their person designated with fire safety responsibilities ie fire, health and safety managers with the opportunity to become involved with the design and construction process thus ensuring improved operational performance and better working environments. There are also ongoing business benefits.

The maintenance and operational costs of a building during its lifecycle far outweigh the original capital cost of construction, and these could potentially be explored and relayed by the fire engineer. Benefits of incorporating fire risk management into the building s fire strategy The key benefits can be identified as: Involvement at an early stage of building, managers and end users or their fire safety/health and safety managers allowing for early challenges of the practical implications of design concepts in terms of how they may impact upon on-going day to day practicalities, maintenance and operational costs pertaining to the fire strategy. Ensuring that full training, commissioning and handover is provided at an early stage, which reduces the cost of a protracted handover and means the building will reach optimal performance sooner. Allowing for post occupancy evaluation, which monitors the project outcomes post completion against performance and cost criteria, and ensures lessons are learned for future projects. When might one be required? A fire risk management strategy may be developed by someone designing new buildings or it may be developed as part of organisations fire risk management system documentation. At the design stage, a fire strategy report will usually contain some commentary on management, for example; where it has been necessary to make assumptions regarding the management of the building in the development of the fire strategy these should be stated in the fire strategy report. The fire strategy report may incorporate more comprehensive commentary on fire risk management, for example; if variations from the national guidance are proposed and justified with the use of fire engineering analysis or simply as the fire strategy report evolves through the design process into an as built fire strategy and more information on the use and management of the building comes to light. A fire risk management strategy for a single building may remain incorporated within the fire strategy report or become a separate document.

If a fire risk management strategy is drafted for an organisation operating a portfolio of buildings it is preferable for it to be a separate document. A fire-risk management strategy can also be developed post occupation. The standard Scope of Works for the Fire Engineer produced by the Fire Industry Association and Fire Engineering Council sets out the following services at RIBA Stage 7 Use and aftercare (previously RIBA stage L). These services are to produce, or assist in the production, of organisational fire risk management policy, strategy and procedure. Moreover, organisations seeking to achieve a high level of assurance and management system level 1, as defined in BS 9999: 2017 can demonstrate this by conformity to PAS 7. In order to demonstrate attainment of a level 1 management system some organisations may decide to have their management system certificated. Who might have cause to develop or review one? There may be a number of professionals with interest in the development of a fire risk management strategy. The interested parties could range from fire safety professionals i.e.

designers, fire engineers and fire safety managers, or owners, tenants, occupants, facility managers, health and safety managers and security staff. There may be a number of professionals with an interest in reviewing a fire risk management strategy and these could include: regulators and enforcers, including building control bodies, fire authorities, health and safety inspectors, environmental health officers, and environmental agencies. There may also be third party certification bodies with an interest in certificating a fire risk management system may wish to assess any claim of conformity against PAS 7. A claim of conformity can be made on the basis of: a) a first ‘party conformity assessment performed by the organization itself (self ‘assessment); b) a second ‘party conformity assessment performed by, for example; a trade association; or c) a third ‘party conformity assessment performed by an organization, such as a certification body, that is independent of both the organization responsible for the fire risk management system and, for example; a trade association. Guidelines for auditing management systems are given in BS EN ISO 19011. Requirements for bodies providing audit and certification of management systems are given in BS EN ISO/IEC 17021-1. How should it be structured? PAS 7 imposes a requirement that the organisation shall define and document its fire risk management strategy in order to implement and maintain procedures that identify the aspects of its activities, products and services relevant to the scope. By considering the context of the organisation it is possible to evaluate the risks to the organizsation by determining and recording those aspects that can have a significant impact on life safety, property protection, business continuity and the environment, as dictated by the organisation s policy.

The fire risk management strategy shall address the following seven factors of strategic fire risk management: Fire risk assessment Resources and authority Fire safety training Control of work on site Maintenance and testing Communication Emergency planning Michael Porter once said: Strategy is about making choices, trade-offs; it s about deliberately choosing to be different . In many ways this is true of a fire risk management strategy. A strategic fire risk management approach can be defined as an integrated or holistic approach to understanding and managing risks posed by the threat of fire that enables an organisation to optimise its underlying processes and achieve more efficient results. In our experience, no two organisations have the same strategy even if they are in the same sector. The benefits of establishing effective fire risk management strategy are clearly demonstrable, being able to align the nuances of fire risk management into the broader auspices of safety/quality management. This is particularly useful for organisations standardising approaches within other disciplines such as: health and safety, environmental protection, business continuity, security and quality systems. BB7 is offering a free gap analysis against the requirements of PAS 7: 2013 Fire Risk Management System Specification.

They are particularly interested in hearing from organisations with complex fire risk management challenges.